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What kind of car guy do you self identify as and why

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Most of us self identify as a particular kind of car guy/gal.    There are Ford guys, Chevy guys,  Mopar guys.      When I think of Rany Ema,  Tim Purrier  and Chris Summers I think "Duesenberg guy".  Ed Minnie is a "Pierce guy".  Don Sears is a "Packard Guy".

 

There are usually reasons we become a particular kind of guy.   Might be our first car,  or it might be what our dad collected.   

 

My dad had lots of different stuff but I always thought of him as either an "Auburn Guy"  or  a "Packard Guy".    Only because those were the cars that ended up sticking the longest.

 

When I was in HS/College I was a GTO guy.  A little later I was a "HEMI" guy.  That is when it was hard to be humble.    These days I would like to self identify as  "540k" guy,  but not sure it fits.   Maybe a Reo Royale guy.

 

I guess I'm a prewar Classic guy now.   I kiss my dad's fanny that he wasn't in to some obscure marque powered by a lawn mower engine that I would be in to now.  I can think of a few but don't want to be offensive (any more than usual).

 

What kind of car guy are you and why?

 

 

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Interesting subject.............I would add a few other descriptive areas........

 

 

Walt G is a coach work guy.

George Holman is a race car guy.

 

Other people I would tend to use the label “a trophy guy” or a “touring or driving guy”.

 

Others would be a “brass car guy” or a “used car guy”. The list is probably endless. 

 

AJ- I don’t think of you as a 540K guy........more like a “one-off guy”.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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I got into Reo's because the whole time I was growing up in he 1950's . I heard my aunts and uncle commenting on my Grandfather's 1930 Reo Sedan

 

They could barely get gasoline or tires during WW 2 or the fun times riding on the running boards soaking wet after getting out of a Lake.

 

The most famous part was that the car was mentioned in Crossword puzzles a 3 letters for a car. R E O

 

I bought a1926 Reo T6 Sedan in 1976 and when I compared it other Marque's I could see the Reo quality.

 

I recently bought a 1931 Reo Royale Victoria in many pieces and I think I have learned my lesson about old cars.

 

They are a lot of work to restore.

 

 

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If anything (my hobby is a continuously evolving process) am a "competition guy". Doesn't particularly matter what kind - economy run, rally, autocross, road racing, or with what - once won an economy run with a '38 Mack dump truck. Also have seen many rule changes afterwards (SCCA didn't like my 8" hood pins on a Corvette - on long straights the back of the hood would raise up and engine temp would drop. Next year that was illegal).

 

Today it is mostly reworking my computer cars to run cooler/ more efficiently.

 

Or could be "DOHC guy" first car had a DOHC-6 and have two now (plus a DOHC-4 and a SOHC-6, two others are auld cam in block cars.)

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I used to consider myself a Chevrolet guy, but not anymore. I love pretty much all of them from every brand. That includes Chevrolet and all the rest. Currently have one Chevrolet, one Ford and one non running Jeep in the family. Although not cognizant of it when getting the Ford last year, one of them is red, one white and one blue. When I realized it though I had to get a photo of them together, but I digress. 

 

I'm known to most people as El Camino Billy and my favorite brand is Edsel. I tend to gravitate towards the unusual and obscure, the less common it is the more I like it. I'm obsessed with Crosleys and cyclecars. I prefer 4-doors and I've thought wagons were cool long before most people did. 

 

I guess I'm unquantifiable. 

 

I am building a reputation as an automotive photographer. Perhaps I can be known as a car photo guy.

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Auburn 851 & 852's, especially Phaetons - I learn every day, though pretty much know every nut and bolt.  

 

I tend to be the same way with 1931 Cadillac's, 1930 Franklins, RR PI's, RR 25/30's, Jaguar MKII's, Austin Healey 3000's, Flathead Cadillac's, 1928 and prior Packard 8's, and ...

 

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I am clearly a prewar Buick guy.  Just look below to see my collection. 

 

And I use a GMC Denali for my everyday driver/tow vehicle because it fits in my garage and rides much better than a pickup.

 

12 Buick Roadster at the top of The Old Spiral Highway.jpg

13 Buick at Pearson.jpg

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Father's Day Ride in Ruby.jpg

1915 Bumble Buick.jpg

Edited by Mark Shaw (see edit history)

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Eclectic,  I get bored after restoring a few of the same and need a new challenge.

My two Grandfathers were like that with businesses, guess I was doomed.

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I am more than a little rusty since I have touched one, though I know ever single part on this too - 1927 Lancia 7th Series. 

 Scan_Pic0003.thumb.jpg.bcd9c8111f04a25ee2ef0cb699763e02.jpg

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The first car I ever owned was a 1929 Studebaker.   I have always owned and driven 1929 Studebaker’s.   I was never a car restorer.  I just like to drive them.   My current 1929 Studebaker is a President Brougham which I drive.   I am the 1929 Studebaker President driver.   Or at least I was.  

 

Now I am the guy who used to be the 1929 Studebaker President driver who now sits in his Studebaker with the engine running in the garage while enjoying the sounds and smells of an old car remembering the good times  because health issues prevents me from driving.   I hope to be the 1929 Studebaker President driver again one day.   I am so tired of just remembering I want to feel and enjoy it again.  

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Edited by Mark Huston (see edit history)
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My Dad, Willis Frankiln Keiser, worked for Chrysler Corporation for 37 years. He raised me around those cars. He used to take us to see the new Chrysler cars being unveiled each year. Being a Chrysler executive for Export-Import Division, I saw MANY odd and unique cars. The night that the Andrea Doria went down was an exiting night for the Keiser family. Dad talked about the beautiful show car that was in the hold of the ship that went to the bottom. He brought cool cars home like the bubble-top Imperial used for the Queen to visit Canada and the USA. He took us for a ride in it at night so we could see the stars through the roof. He also brought home cars from the Chrysler Executive car lot that were mostly special order jobs. I like LOADS of other cars, but I will always be a "Chrysler guy".

Queens car that we rode in.jpg

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Pre War car guy, I was 10 years old in 1961 when Mom dropped me off at the Fairfield County Region HCCA Fall Meet here in Ridgefield. There was a 1942 cutoff date, and some of the finest cars in the world showed up there with owners that helped shape my interest in Antique cars. Being young I'd often get a call from someone retiring or moving South, so I've always been a Parts Guy, only do Hershey now, internet is a lot easier. Unfinished Projects guy is how I'll be remembered. Bob 

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
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A car nut since birth! My dad was a car salesman in the 50's, he brought home a different car every day. I would sit in the window and watch for him. When I was 10 or so a man across the alley from my grandparents had a Model T and a Model A in his yard. He let me play in them and I was hooked!

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I'm just a car guy, I guess.   I like 'em all, which is probably a symptom of my far worse affliction ... I'm a gear head.  If it's mechanical, I like it.  Electrical, not so much.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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Interesting topic! I am just now taking a break from typing a story I wrote on a coach work builder - so yes Ed, I am a coach work guy  ( thank you very much) and I also , like my friend Bob , identify myself as a  Pre War car guy , that being said I have come to appreciate and enjoy post war cars as well in the past year or two. It would be very difficult for me to pin myself down to a specific make of car  - I owned a Franklin for over 40 years but now have a Packard and a Buick - both pre war.  Many cars I would love to experience and own: Reo Royale, Cunningham, Pierce Arrow , model L Lincoln , Studebaker Land Cruiser , the list will be endless so I will stop now, go back to finishing the typing - then look at the list of at least 2 dozen stories I have ideas for and the material to look at/ research  that haven't and need to be told. So this is retirement????

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Not sure how to label myself.

For pre-war I enjoy the more unusual marques.

The ones you rarely hear of. I enjoy being able to go to a show and know there is a 99% chance there will not be another car like mine there.

I enjoy spreading the word about orphaned marques and educating others on cars they may never have known existed.

But I do think that Pierce Arrow was the finest pre-war American car ever built.

 

For post war cars I'm definitely a Chevy guy.

My Dad was a post-war Ford guy and he had at least 6 different ones while I was growing up.

A '53 that he restored and kept until he passed and a bunch of different '64 Galaxies.

I always helped him work on his Fords, but I hated so many things about how the cars were designed that I used to joke with him that I was working on the car out of respect for its age, not because I like Fords.  Haha.

In '64 those Galaxies still had a generator and it was mounted way down low on the big blocks.

Perfect place to get wet in the rain and cause problems not to mention a pain in the butt to get to when it needed to be changed.

The funky steering system with the ram arm instead of a power box like Chevy's - I could go on and on.  😏

 

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Are you a fine thread nut or a coarse thread nut? The fine thread car nut can be seen, beautifully dressed, beside his shiny restored car at Pebble Beach. A team of flunkies are cleaning the tire treads with toothbrushes and polishing the chrome. If you asked him a technical question about his car, he would be stuck for an answer. He buys wax by the case.

 

The coarse thread car nut wears jeans and T shirt, dungarees or greasy overalls. You will find him in the garage, lying under his car on a piece of cardboard. He can tell you the specs of his engine down to the finest detail. If you ask the color of his upholstery  he will have to look at the car or think for a minute. He buys hand cleaner by the case.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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I think our individual pasts have a great influence on what kind of cars we collect and appreciate--it is probably the single greatest driver of this hobby. However, now that I've had the job that I have for as long as I have, I've learned to be an open-minded car guy. We box ourselves into a niche with things we like or that we understand and tend stay there. There's absolutely nothing wrong with that and I'm guilty of it myself with 1941 Buicks (which, of course, were my father's favorites). In the past 10 years, I've had cars that I've always wanted and they turned out to be a disappointment. I've also had cars that I never in a million years would have expected to like and just fell in love. I'm a pre-war guy, but sampling certain post-war cars has opened my eyes as well.

 

For example, Melanie's 1956 Chrysler wagon is one of the best old cars I've ever driven, period. I wouldn't have picked a 1956 Chrysler as a car I wanted to own, but now that I have one, I'm a convert and it delights us every time we use it.

 

Another example: I've always wanted a 1934 Packard, ever since I was about 8 years old. I'm not alone and they're wonderful cars. I've now had three of them and none really made me excited. I WANTED to be excited about them, but they were just OK to me. Granted, none was a Twelve, none were open cars, and none were exceptional cars, but if a car was really going to talk to me, those factors wouldn't be as critical. I spent 40 years waiting for a 1934 Packard and when I got one... meh. I remain open to owning a great one because I still think they're beautiful and I do browse "1934 Packard" with regularity on all the major sites. But I'm no longer hungry to own one.

 

Example three: A fellow in Pittsburgh called me a few years ago and said that he was moving into a retirement home and had to get his son's old car out of the garage. It was literally that story: his son had died in Vietnam in 1970 and his car had been sitting since then. It had to go now that he was moving. He just said it was a black Chevy convertible. I wasn't terribly excited, the guy didn't know how to send photos, but it was only 2 hours away so why not? I get there, we hike into the back yard where there's a building, and we drag the doors open on this garage.

 

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The first thing I see is a big hulk covered with boxes, debris, lawn equipment, and 40 years of neglect. But I also see this:

 

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I say, "I'll take it," without looking any closer or even cleaning it off. Here it is when we finally got the junk off it and pulled it out into the light:

 

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Then we spent more than a year on it, cleaning, fixing, servicing, sorting. New fuel system, new brake system, new top (the original just couldn't be saved), new tires, new exhaust, rebuilt everything like water pump, fuel pump, carburetor, alternator, starter, etc. We buffed the paint and removed the interior to clean it--we pressure washed the carpets out in the parking lot and put them back in when they were dry. Not restored, but serviced, cleaned, and resuscitated to run like new. Result?

 

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Matching-numbers triple black 1966 Impala SS427 convertible with just 28,000 original miles. Loaded with options and we even found the build sheet under the rear seat.

 

Anyway, I'm digressing other than to say I LOVED this car. One of the very best cars I've ever laid hands on, never mind owned. Drove like new: fast, powerful, smooth, no squeaks or rattles, and while the '66 Impalas are a little plain, I found it handsome in its own way. This was a car I never, ever would have expected in a million years to fall in love with, yet here it was. I loved looking at it, I loved sitting in it, and I loved the endless reserves of smooth, effortless torque it delivered. I deeply regret selling it and this is one of two cars where I've asked the new owner to sell it back to me when he's done. He's still got it with no intentions of giving it up.

 

So this is a long way of saying that you should try to keep your options open if you're browsing for something new, because there are great cars out there that you haven't discovered for yourself yet. Everyone loves something, and I've found it worthwhile to explore why other people love the cars they do--they're not fools and maybe there's some merit to their choices. I've never been a Chevy guy, let alone a post-war or muscle car guy, but this is my #2 all-time favorite car. I would not have picked it out of a lineup of cars I wanted to own and if you said I could own 100 cars to fill out a collection, I'm pretty sure this car would not have made the list prior to me owning it. Nevertheless, I found something that I would not have discovered otherwise and it was awesome.

 

So be an open-minded car guy. You might just be surprised by all the amazing stuff out there you never would have considered...

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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I was going through some papers from my childhood recently, and I came across a large drawing I made in 6th or 7th grade picturing the kind of car I really loved at the time.  I had to laugh when I saw the drawing, as it looked identical to the car I recently bought.

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11 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

So be an open-minded car guy. You might just be surprised by all the amazing stuff out there you never would have considered...

 

A few years ago I would have never even entertained the thought of owning a Ford Model A, but the availability of parts and their overall driveability has had me rethinking this.

 

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16 minutes ago, zepher said:

 

A few years ago I would have never even entertained the thought of owning a Ford Model A, but the availability of parts and their overall driveability has had me rethinking this.

 

 
Many think the model A’s and model T’s are mundane. I have had more fun with those cars than any others I have ever owned. I am open minded and love all cars. I’m just a little out of round!

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2 minutes ago, Jeff Perkins / Mn said:

 
Many think the model A’s and model T’s are mundane. I have had more fun with those cars than any others I have ever owned. I am open minded and love all cars. I’m just a little out of round!

 

My main reason for not wanting one in the past was because they are everywhere.

But these days even a Model A is somewhat rare at shows these days.

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I would have to say "I'm an Old Car Guy".   My list of former vehicles reads like a "Bucket List" to me.  As I think back over them, I could still love most of them today.   About 50 years ago, when I was new to the hobby, I cut out ads in Hemming's of cars my father had owned during his life. 

I framed them as "Cars of John Dobbin and gave it to him.  He loved it and was amazed at the prices of all his old cars and enjoyed my interest and restoration projects.   After all I got my inspiration from him when he told  at age 13 that I

could buy a old motorcycle and he would split the purchase cost with me.  One condition, I had to restore it before I could ride it.  I learned a lot and took real good care of it due to my sweat equity, which has stuck with me for a lifetime of old cars.

Edited by Paul Dobbin (see edit history)
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I am a "sports car " guy.  Stutz Bearcat or  Vauxhall 30 - 98 all the way to late 70's FIA cars.  My flip side is old trucks. Polar opposites . Gas is quite expensive in my area , generally the highest price in North America.

So anything I drive much needs to have good fuel economy. 

 

Greg

imagesvauxhall.jpg

Chevron-Racing-Car-1600x1067.jpg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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I would hope most see me as a carburetor guy ;)

 

As far as a specific car make/style ????? Maybe a John Deere tractor or heavy truck.....................whatever is required to get the job done!

 

Quoting padgett "my hobby is a continuously evolving process": over the years, have owned and enjoyed tractors, trucks, sedans, roadsters (not any more, I "burn" too easily), hardtops, sports cars, muscle cars, and mini-vans.

 

I will never afford either of my two dream cars (both produced by Jaguar) unless I win the lottery (and I don't play).

 

I just enjoy things mechanical. 

 

Jon.

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