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Mark Huston

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  1. Unfortunately, this issue extends to other cars during this same time period. My 1929 Studebaker President is also infected with an over abundance of pot metal. Unlike more popular makes, like Cadillac, there isn’t anyone currently reproducing replacement parts. If a part returns to ashes the only alternative is to find one good enough to be used as a pattern and have a one off casting made. Ain’t life grand?
  2. Another interesting car with a poor description and subpar photos. The quality and quantity of the pictures could have been improved if the seller had taken the time to pull the car out of the garage. Makes me wonder why.
  3. A question for the Packard experts here. My area of old car knowledge is the 1929-30 Studebaker Presidents. On a 1929 vintage open Studebaker the floors had fitted rubber mats. Not carpets. I noticed that this open Packard has a carpet covering on the front floor instead of rubber. By 1939, did Packard’s high end cars use carpet on the front floors in open cars instead of rubber?
  4. Prior to this post I was happily ignorant regarding not knowing anything about Chip Foose. Unfortunately, I can’t go back.
  5. I have not heard of Butters and a Google search didn’t turn up any information. Do you have a website or other information for Butters?
  6. Thank you for helping to clarify the way this Duesenberg started out in life. I have enjoyed reading all of the comments and have been enlightened by the shared knowledge posted here. Comparing the picture of how this Duesenberg looked when originally built to how it now looks with an open body I prefer the original version. I guess it is from seeing nothing but open Duesenbergs in person or in pictures I have become numb to Duesenberg roadsters and phaetons. I prefer the elegance and rarity of a large formal closed body Duesenberg.
  7. Everything I know about working on antique cars I learned the hard way. A friend of mine did a frame up restoration on a 1929 Studebaker. He says he didn't restore the car just once but at least four or five times - because everything on the car was done more than once before it was done correctly.
  8. This picture was posted on a Facebook group with the following caption “1932 Duesenberg Model J Tourster in the style of Derham.” The use of the description “in the style of” caught my eye and got me wondering if this particular Duesenberg has been rebodied. Does anyone recognize this car and do you know the history and what body this car originally had?
  9. My mistake on the wheels. I guess I will blame my error on poor pictures and morning eyes using a cellphone.
  10. Interesting story attached to this car. However, the story should have no place on a show field for judging. Where would a car like this get placed at an AACA judging event?
  11. We have a cluster box for mail delivery on our street. Frequently, we have mail for our neighbors. I have also witnessed our USPS mail delivery person drop packages on our porch for our neighbors. Packages are clearly addressed and our homes are all clearly numbered with address visible. It always amazes me how the mail delivery person can so easily mix up addresses. There is only one answer which I will refrain from stating.
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