Steve_Mack_CT

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About Steve_Mack_CT

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    Married, one child, one spoiled dog & one garage cat

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  1. Steve_Mack_CT

    Advice / input on buying a late 20's - early 30's car

    Tom Laferriere has a 28 Pontiac coupe, nice looking car, on his ste, very reasonably priced and i believe at his place in RI, not too far from NY...
  2. Steve_Mack_CT

    1938 Packard 120 convertible

    Something about the description seems off to me. Old pics, generic info such as wheelbase and no AC, Email only, I am thinking maybe scam...
  3. Steve_Mack_CT

    1928 Ford Model A Sport Coupe

    As Matt said on another A here, I would say on this one a nice car at a reasonable price, esp. With overdrive!!!
  4. Steve_Mack_CT

    Advice / input on buying a late 20's - early 30's car

    John, exactly what I was looking for from Ed. Not to discourage a Classic, but to use knowledge of the group. He may be a good person to talk to about helping find a car that fits the bill ss well.
  5. Steve_Mack_CT

    Advice / input on buying a late 20's - early 30's car

    One thought on this is advice i have been given when contemplating a couple of CCCA cars needing work. Are you looking to tinker, sort, restore, or maintain, or drive and wax mainly? That jolt of reality has kept me from buying say, a Classic for 20k needing 10, 15k in servicing to enjoy vs. A cheaper car with more predictable service costs. But closed CCCA cars, and non Classic indepenents can be great cars for the right buyer.
  6. Steve_Mack_CT

    Advice / input on buying a late 20's - early 30's car

    I think, and others can chime in with more knowledge, the big boys from that era differ from higher production volume, lower end cars more significantly than the postwar period or even late 30s. It seems more components were shared as the 30s went on. Consolidation in the auto industry itself is also a factor. On the plus side, Big wheelbase, more hp can make for more comfort and smooth power on big cars but they tend to have more complex mechanicals. It has been said (I believe by knowledgeable poster Ed Minnie, who I would call an expert on many of the bigger cars) the avg. Classic from that period has 5,000 more parts overall than say a Ford A. So, it stands to reason the $27k Caddy is a little more challenging to maintain than a sorted, tour ready A at the top of the range. For this reason, if we move up as much as I would love a Classic, i personally might look at early v8 Fords in coupe or open bodys. Newer than your target era but maybe something to consider if you were to go to say, 1935.
  7. Steve_Mack_CT

    Advice / input on buying a late 20's - early 30's car

    +1 on that caddy. Agree with Mark that seemed like a lot of car for the money!
  8. Steve_Mack_CT

    Advice / input on buying a late 20's - early 30's car

    Beer, Dragone boys out of Bridgeport have a nice 30 A phaeton available, I think $24k. Might be worth a peek.
  9. Steve_Mack_CT

    1929 Ford Model A

    Oh just went to listing, as said, nice but wow, price seems a tad optomistic....
  10. Steve_Mack_CT

    1929 Ford Model A

    Interesting fitment of 28, 29 body and 30 shell,as hood seems to line up ok. To me that means better workmanship than many. Very traditional looking car, love it.
  11. Steve_Mack_CT

    Advice / input on buying a late 20's - early 30's car

    Actually, in thinking about it, op might find an interesting non Ford alternative in that price range, the Caddy, Franklin options or the nice buick coupe elsewhere on the forum could fit the bill. Great thread!
  12. Steve_Mack_CT

    Advice / input on buying a late 20's - early 30's car

    On the A phaeton, nice enough car, top is incorrect but better looking than the correct black cobra grain top. An example of whsts typically seen in terms of creative license but likely not an issue. If you want a pre 32, easy to maintain, drive and resell and can go low 20s you can get an A in the bodystyle of your choice likely with a touring engine (insert vs. Babbit bearings, a little more hp) and poss od set up. These generally help vs hurt value in all but the fine point cars, and are usually the quickest to sell. Join MARC and the monthly is really high quality, always a few good cars availble in classified section..
  13. Steve_Mack_CT

    Advice / input on buying a late 20's - early 30's car

    Yes, the Model A market is all over the place but their is order if one takes the time to research. Fine point cars using NOS parts and little or no repro stuff, rare bodystyles like the A400 or two door phaeton will command a premium. Many newer, older restorations, projects and the occasional original show up for much less. As Mercer says, Fordbarn is a great resource. At 5 foot, 9 inches, 230 lbs i could stand to lose a few but fit in my 30 roadster just fine. 28, 29s are generally tighter and tudors have adjustible seats. Little wood in tudors, roadsters, lots in sedans.
  14. Steve_Mack_CT

    Advice / input on buying a late 20's - early 30's car

    All good advice above. I would check in with regular poster Matt Harwood who may still have a very reasonably priced Pontiac 2 door sedan ready to rock since you mentioned Pontiac. Quick pitch for a late T or better, imo, a Model A to get feel for the era. Always a ready market for an A if you decide its not for you, a bit more market risk with non Ford, non CCCA cars I think.
  15. Steve_Mack_CT

    1932 Buick model 56 Coupe, $16550.00 OBO

    A lot of car for Model A money. GLWS!