leomara

Golf Cart and Other Types of Hershey Flea Market Traffic

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Beautiful weather. I had a great time. The only thing negative which I have to comment on is the proliferation of mechanized vehicles being driven through the flea market. Years past they used to drag a can underneath them so you as a pedestrian were aware of their location. Not any more, there are dozens of these being used now and I've observed them speeding and weaving through groups of people and the operators talking on cell phones while driving them. This has got to be controlled because it's now out of control.  Someone is going to be injured.

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Quote

 

Maybe there should be a rule that they have to pin a playing card on the front forks ?

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Sorry, but the dragging can, chains, or steel pipe on each cart is the most annoying thing at Hershey. Yes, the drivers of these vehicles need to watch where they are going and NOT look at the wares in the swap spaces, but that's a different problem. When every  motorized vehicle has a noismaker, you rapidly get to the point that you ignore them, which renders the annoying noise moot as far as a supposed "safety" feature. Sorry, but it is the responsibility of the driver of the vehicle to watch out for pedestrians, not the other way around.

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I HATE the cans.  Obnoxious to the extreme. Much less prevalent this year for some reason.

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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Worst part for me was seeing supposedly handicapped operators stop their scooter, JUMP off, walk around a vendors wares, get back on, move a few spots, and do it again. Need to have a better screening process for cart passes.

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And -- 90 % of those drive - byes DON'T BUY ANYTHING from anybody......

I would love to tip everyone of them da.n things over -- they USELESSLY

fill the aisles.

It will take them running over an 18 month old girl to put a stop to them.

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This was my first year at Hershey with my son and from what I heard on the forums was that carts and vehicles were a problem and I didn't find it that way at all.  It was actually a heck of a lot safer and more orderly than a city street with pedestrians and cars.  There are a lot of aging attendees so you are going to see more mobility vehicles.  One thing they could do is to make the passageways and lanes a bit wider.  There is actually plenty of room to do this as there were plenty of gaps in the show field where people didn't show up or they don't have enough vendors to fill the spaces anymore.  

 

If someone has a state handicapped placard then they can use a mobility device.  There is not a screening process that needs to be done, as it is pretty straight forward from the state.  They checked at the entrances to the vendor fields and the car corral for the handicap placard.  I actually saw some of the patrolling AACA people that were a bit over the top and it bordered on ADA violations.  I saw one guy who had a prosthetic leg on a mobility device with his handicapped placard taped to the front and an AACA volunteer in a golf cart yelled at him because he didn't have his scooter registered.  He then made the statement if you don't get that thing registered then we are going to have to park you and you will be walking back.  Not a good way to treat people and not very welcoming at all.  

 

Sometimes I worry that people in this hobby want to keep things the way they always were and not wanting to adapt to the modern world.  If we don't adapt with modern times and how things work in today's world, then we just chase people away and events like this continue to shrink.  Another great example of this is 95% of vendors take cash only.  I don't know many people under the age of 30 that actually carry any cash.  I am in my 40's and don't carry cash and it was a pain in the ass to go get actual cash at the bank in preparation to attend Hershey.  The other thing that was very absurd was that no vendor actually had a sign that said what aisle and space number they were at and the stickers on the pavement were all worn down by Wednesday.  I wasted probably over 1 hour a day or more trying to find a booth based on the program book.  For example I wanted to find a vendor who was selling door handles.  It gives a code like C3H in the program but then there are no signs that mark the aisles or the vendor spaces.  Yes you can try and use the big numbers on the light posts, but that gets you an approximation.  This seems like such a simple thing to do and would make the experience so much simpler and effective.  

 

Overall our first Hershey event was great and very enjoyable, though I see lots of ways this event will need to adapt if it wants to get the younger crowd joining in.  

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My take on the handicap carts is this: There seems to be a lot of handicapped people who don’t appear to be handicapped riding around in carts. A friend was going to use a cart so he brought his handicap card and insurance paperwork. I thought that each cart was to have a handicap card displayed on the cart. I can’t remember seeing a handicap card on any cart at Hershey. If the cart users were handicapped, they sure hid it well. So you see apparently healthy guys riding around in carts rushing by guys with artificial legs walking around. Zeke

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Sorry, but the younger crowd is NOT joining in....

I give applause when a young man is there with his father or grandfather -- because I think it is a great thing when a family WANTS to be together at an absolutely awesome event like HERSHEY -- the number one car show in the universe...

But sadly, partially due to a lot of bad parenting, the younger generation has absolutely no interest in this "hobby" and can't afford to get in.... Most of the young kids do not want or care or respect a 1928 Chevy or a 1931 Ford....

And they really don't care about a 1952 Buick or 1947 Ford...

It pains me to say this --- but our "hobby" is on borrowed time....

Point of interest -- I don't care if you invested $ 50,000 in putting a Model A together -- does anyone in their right mind think you would sell it for more than $ 10,000 to possibly $ 15,000.....

Do you think anyone under the age of 60 would fork over $ 900,000 for a

Deusenberg????

We are on borrowed time --- only thanks to all the foreigners -- Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands, Great Britain, Brazil, and on and on -- will this "hobby" carry on for another 10 years..... And that is for those of us who are still alive..... Reality.

 

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3 minutes ago, zeke01 said:

My take on the handicap carts is this: There seems to be a lot of handicapped people who don’t appear to be handicapped riding around in carts. A friend was going to use a cart so he brought his handicap card and insurance paperwork. I thought that each cart was to have a handicap card displayed on the cart. I can’t remember seeing a handicap card on any cart at Hershey. If the cart users were handicapped, they sure hid it well. So you see apparently healthy guys riding around in carts rushing by guys with artificial legs walking around. Zeke

You don’t display your handicapped card on the cart though that would be a better way.  You have to go to the registration and they look at the handicapped placard and your license then put a colored strip bracelet on the cart.  That way the security people can check the cart at the entrance to each area.  

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8 minutes ago, mobileparts said:

Sorry, but the younger crowd is NOT joining in....

I give applause when a young man is there with his father or grandfather -- because I think it is a great thing when a family WANTS to be together at an absolutely awesome event like HERSHEY -- the number one car show in the universe...

But sadly, partially due to a lot of bad parenting, the younger generation has absolutely no interest in this "hobby" and can't afford to get in.... Most of the young kids do not want or care or respect a 1928 Chevy or a 1931 Ford....

And they really don't care about a 1952 Buick or 1947 Ford...

It pains me to say this --- but our "hobby" is on borrowed time....

Point of interest -- I don't care if you invested $ 50,000 in putting a Model A together -- does anyone in their right mind think you would sell it for more than $ 10,000 to possibly $ 15,000.....

Do you think anyone under the age of 60 would fork over $ 900,000 for a

Deusenberg????

We are on borrowed time --- only thanks to all the foreigners -- Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands, Great Britain, Brazil, and on and on -- will this "hobby" carry on for another 10 years..... And that is for those of us who are still alive..... Reality.

 

You should check out the AACA Facebook page with the thread with over 60 replies from last night about Hershey alienating the younger crowd.  There are many younger people on there commenting that they can’t get off of work to come to Hershey and then all of the swap vendors leave Friday morning or early afternoon.  My 19 year old son was there this week buying parts, however other younger people that he knows with interest couldn’t come due to work.  

Edited by kfle (see edit history)
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My bad. Thanks for the education. Zeke

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57 minutes ago, mobileparts said:

Do you think anyone under the age of 60 would fork over $ 900,000 for a

Deusenberg????

 

/raises hand

//oooh! Ooooh! Mr. Kotter! Ooooh! Call on me!

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I would tomorrow if i had it. No brainer.  Unfortunately I'm about $870,000 short right now.   Forgot to mention I'm 45 and would have when I was 25. 

I found myself contemplating on how much I would even enjoy owning the 28 Packard roadster someone had parked at our hotel,  unfortunately without a for sale sing on it.  One of the factors that made me rethink the 32 Plymouth coupe I was trying to decide whether to buy or not and i just realized I would really much rather have a Roadster and hopefully one day Packard like this. 

IMG_0683.JPG

IMG_0684.JPG

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

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I had the pleasure of enjoying a cart person vs. non-cart person altercation right behind my cars this afternoon. 


Here's our car corral space and my oldest son sitting behind our cars (yes, he is laying face-down on the chair in that one photo--he's weird). You'll note the driveway that extends up to the Orange field, closed off by a heavy chain locked in place with a padlock by the Hershey people. That chain doesn't quite have enough slack to allow most carts to roll underneath but dozens of guys try it every day. Today a cart person was trying and clothes-lined himself pretty well on the chain and a nearby non-cart person laughed out loud. The cart person was shockingly able-bodied because he extricated himself from the cart/chain/parts pile and stalked over and gave the non-cart guy a good shove there on the grass to the right side of the photos. The non-cart person said something like, "I'm so sick of you guys on carts who don't even need them getting in everyone's way." There was some pushing and yelling and then the guy went back to his cart, dragged it under the chain on its side, stood it up, and hummmed away--not sure you can look like much of a tough guy on a Rascal, but whatever. I'm guessing that if you can drag your cart under the chain and stand it up, you're probably not disabled. 

 

619803936_2019-10-1010_32_42.thumb.jpg.9650ebb23aefc521020b2e805cf201f5.jpg  1287574289_2019-10-1010_24_59.thumb.jpg.3da8398ad147369a3c3bee2955837a37.jpg

 

I have stopped trying to help the cart people get under that chain. If that makes me a shiatty person, well, I guess I'm a shiatty person. But I'd be holding that chain the whole time I'm here rather than selling cars and talking to people and enjoying myself. And it really is amusing as hell watching one guy after another crash into the chain or try to limbo under it without getting out of his seat. I'm sorry if they're disabled and can't walk, but I don't think there are many of those and I have yet to see a real disabled guy try to run the chain gauntlet and get hopelessly tangled. Every guy I've seen is able to get out of the cart, drag it over to the curb, up onto the grass, and back onto the pavement on the other side. EVERY ONE.

 

I think the people using carts vs. the people who NEED carts ratio is all out of whack at Hershey.

 

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, zeke01 said:

My take on the handicap carts is this: There seems to be a lot of handicapped people who don’t appear to be handicapped riding around in carts. 

 

I don't know whether that's the case, but my father's

experience might shed some light.  He could walk

some distance, but after about 100 yards would be

worn out, due to back problems that surgery didn't solve,

or made worse.  He never rode a cart or scooter, and in his

last times at Hershey just went with me to the car show

and walked around from my car's location.  He would

stop to sit and rest more than an able-bodied man would.

 

If you saw him walk the limited amount, you would

think he was fine and would fit the quote above.

He wasn't fine.  I miss him.

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car corral had even more carts and even some atv that where made to look like a golf cart

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I am a recent member to the need a cart community . My disability is easier to see then some because ,I live on oxygen 24/7 . I hate to have to use it but without could not make attending worth while . The first year I carried in four o2 bottles and ask a vendor whom I knew if I could store and pull as need . No problem . I soon discovered all it did was allow me to go to another field and have to return almost as quickly . So went the golf cart route for two years inviting another to join as he two was disabled . Two guy one cart , better .

 This year  as I am getting stronger parked the cart and walked sections of isles and used cart as o2 storage . To make better use of also helped a couple guys haul out some heavy iron parts . Good Feeling !

 Point is you cannot always see the problem and it is not always extreme . Maybe something a simple as a shuttle to and from the lot . And around perimeter of site . Knocking a 1/2 to a mile off the day for many of the aging would mean a lot . Face it we are stubborn men . And  tend not to go for help until to late . So knowing you will always be able to get easily back to your ride will not only allow you to do more years of this but may even bring a few people back .

 PS ;  the new seat stations place thought out did not go unnoticed .

 

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I could go on for many pages about the carts........but only one comment really matters.............

 

ADA

 

You can use ANYTHING you need to get around..........ANYTHING.......including a tractor trailer. The cart problems are NOT going to go away. That said, I did notice a lot of golf carts without the can.......BAD IDEA. The small electric three and four wheels jobs never bother me as they are small and easy to deal with, and the owners don’t seem to have the golf cart attitude of get out of my way. As a matter of fact, none of the small electric people even came close to me, and none parked in a “stupid” spot. Amazing. Now the golf cart people are just a pain in the axx most of the time. Face reality.........it’s not going to get better............

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Why doesn't anyone use sleighbells? I wouldn't mind listening to those all day. Luckily our neighbor who sets up across from us is a big gregarious guy with a pleasant demeanor. He got hit by an older dude on a cart Thursday night walking through the row. Its tough because everyone driving is also looking at the same time.

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No dog in the fight here but I do the Portland Race track swap meet and here is my take.

I consider myself as able bodied, But certainly not as able as I used to be.

That comment above about saving that half mile walk is me. If I walk a mile I'm done for a few hours to wait for my feet to come back.

If I didn't have the golf cart I would not be able to get very far from my space because I know I still have to walk back.

I often park the cart away from my space and take short walks.

And I rarely drive it faster that the crowd is walking.

Works for me.

They don't allow carts at the Expo side of the show, They also make everyone leave at closing. (no camping or over night of any kind)

I had to give up my spaces up there as all the walking (All hard surfaces) made it difficult for me.

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I've never been to Hershey so I'm unclear as to whether the "carts" being discussed are the golf cart-type vehicles or the smaller more maneuverable "mobility scooters".  If the "carts" are the golf cart type, then they should not be allowed in congested areas such as a flea market.  At the annual Turkey Rod Run in Daytona, Florida, golf carts, unless affiliated with show management, are not allowed; however, mobility scooters are allowed and can be rented near the main show entrance.

 

As for the complaint that cash only is accepted by most flea market vendors: crikey, Its a FLEA market, and most vendors are not set up to take credit cards, bit coin etc.  If one is told in advance that cash only sales predominate in the flea market area, what's the beef?

 

Cheers,

Grog

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It's my understanding that you don't need any evidence of being handicapped to "register" a cart or mobile device, as asking the question infringes on one's rights.

 

aka ada as Ed says.  

 

I do hate the cans,  but what I really hate is that some people on carts think they have the right of way, but in my mind a padestrian has the right of way.  I was almost hit many times, and my bad knees don't allow me to change direction quickly...

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