md murray

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Everything posted by md murray

  1. A fantastic V-16 at Arizona, all original, needs nothing. Jump in and tour. Drive it home.......65k. --Is this the vehicle Ed is referring to? maybe not? if so then Jeeez! that's an incredible car https://rmsothebys.com/en/auctions/az20/arizona/lots/r0010-1931-cadillac-v-16-seven-passenger-imperial-sedan-by-fleetwood/830529
  2. I was told by the owner of a late 1920's Lincoln service car that Ford sent the dealers specific instruction on how they wanted them to cut down old limos/ 7passengers and fabricate the new service bodies. I guess they wanted to promote an appearance of conformity among the dealers. It would be pretty interesting to get a look at this literature-anyone ever seen/heard of this?
  3. You are correct -that red wrecker is from another gentleman's estate a little further south and definitely not from Hawkeye's. He had a couple of really cool old service cars including a 12 cylinder Cadillac. The only thing he had with a boom was a monster mounted on a gigantic long Buick chassis that he used to pull the engines out of the various old wooden boats he was playing with. Incidentally, just for good record the boats that he owned over the years were just incredible and certainly far more exceptional and rare than any car that he ever owned with the exception of the Minerva. Anyhow, this picture was on the The Old Motor a while back and is one that I think would be awesome to try an emulate
  4. There was someone on here within the last year that had a cool early 1920's Hudson (speedster or speedway 6 or something?) who had pointed out that it was correct to brush paint the body. The fenders on the other hand were sprayed nice and shiny black - they called this "Japanned" back in the day. I wonder how many other cars of that period should have a brushed body to be truly authentic?
  5. Oh that's very sad- I had no idea. All those young guys look like they had a wonderful time with some spectacular cars back in the day. Some of the best pictures in the collection show the gang with their cars all lined up along the infield at the Indy 500 just after the war. There is an 851/852 speedster(with New York plates-so they had quite a road trip), Packard 733 and Duesenberg all lined up and everyone is stretched out, laying on the hoods and hanging out in the sun watching the action. I'm almost tempted to pay the Revs Institute their $40 fee for a copy of this one!
  6. That Tom McKean has got be the most photogenic AACA member in history- every picture of him just exudes total Charisma! There is a Hemp Oliver picture from the Devon meet with Mr. McKean and his lovely wife in a very early Pierce with his kids seated next to them in a smaller toy car and everybody is just beaming-totally having a blast. It's one of the happiest little vignettes I've ever seen and it very neatly sums up everything we should all ever strive for and hope to get out of our involvement in this club of ours. The AACA should seriously frame the picture and hang it up in the headquarters somewhere.
  7. Was this a better buy than that green 902 coupe roadster that sold @ Rm's Guyton sale for $70,000 last spring? Just a standard but at least it was all documented and verified. https://rmsothebys.com/en/auctions/gc19/the-guyton-collection/lots/r0043-1932-packard-eight-coupe-roadster/750653 This was also the same sort of thing - another older restoration https://www.cottoneauctions.com/lots/60298/1931-packard-model-840
  8. Walt, thank you -that solves the mystery! There is a man in coveralls standing next to the Napier who appears in another Oliver photo sitting next to club co-founder Tom McKean. This man is named FRANK LOCKWOOD. Very interesting stuff for sure- Now I'm on a mission to do some digging and find the article you're referring to!
  9. From the map it looks like this little hamlet is right across the river from the Philadelphia country club. There is a great series of photos from the 1940's that show a number of junk but all very high end 1920's/30's cars laying around a large property. They are so special in fact that one would think that there must be an old timer from the area that remembers them ( I'll bet Bayard Badenhausen would know). I had wanted to post a few of them here but If I am to respect the wishes of The Revs Institute digital library I guess I can only post a link? They are definitely worth a look- several early Rolls, Cadillac, a Napier everything-pretty interesting all taken by Smith Hempstone Oliver who would appear to have been a pretty cool guy that captured pictures of some amazing stuff back in the day. Anyhow, it would be pretty neat if someone remembered how and who exactly saved all these special cars-Hopefully they avoided the scrap heap. https://library.revsinstitute.org/digital/custom/single-image?id=276452&collection=p17257coll1
  10. Looks pretty cool w the tonneau snapped in too.
  11. I guess that's it...pretty different looking.
  12. This Blackhawk? is spectacular. -I wish the guy wasn't standing there, I would love to see what the whole body. Is that seating behind him? Dual cockpit or I wonder if its all open? What are the little bits going along the top of windshield frame? Fasteners/snaps for a top? What an incredibly unique car-wow
  13. If this thing sells for $5mill what does that make John Belushi's Bluesmobile worth? -way better chase scene too
  14. I just wanna be there to watch the guy that buys the 2001 ford ranger.
  15. ….and I'm sorry but I'm afraid that price doesn't include any cosmetic detailing
  16. Interesting...ok that makes sense -I know that there was certainly some very serious money all in one tent that day
  17. Re-fabricated bodies certainly didn't seem to hurt the value of many of the Don C. Boulton cars sold at Bonham's Amelia sale last March! But I guess that's older stuff and a different animal altogether.
  18. A handful of really cool Packards, an 851 speedster, L model Lincoln and a Duesenberg w/a new body all running with the monster trucks and hot rods @ Mecum next week. It's sad to see all the chrome on these cars covered with the same uniform level of surface corrosion and muck. They're all from the same collection- I guess if you've got the bucks to restore a garage full of these cars you can also afford to just let them sit and forget about them? I can't help but wonder how much other really great stuff must be out there just collecting dust and rust.
  19. Interesting- I will have to check that old thread out.
  20. A couple of photos someone has listed right now on fee-bay that I thought some folks on here would get a kick out of. The back of photo reads: "Car # 27 at Indianapolis 1930 10th place. Tommy Wolfe in his 1903 Stutz torpedo speedster v-12 Cadillac motor" The photo itself is from 1947. Pretty interesting that they souped it up with the Cadillac v-12.
  21. Yeah altruistic behavior is what he did best -just read the accounts of anyone working there before the war.
  22. Yes, that's what I'm trying to wrap my head around- such a dollar difference between the two cars. I automatically think of them as being on par with each other but I guess its all about performance and size in this instance.
  23. Really snazzy body lines on Chrysler and I appreciate how unique it is but dollar for dollar I sort of like that green Royale convertible coupe that was offered recently way better
  24. The whole Henry Ford thing is pretty hilarious. He creates quite a paradox for the Ford Motor Company, public schools, the American people. As much as we should all like to celebrate his genius and accomplishments it is of course impossible to turn a blind eye to his numerous faults. Luckily Mr. Ford went to great lengths to publish his prolific thoughts surrounding Judaism and other many things between 1920 and 1922 so that we may never have to speculate on or surmise what kind of individual that he truly was. -Babe Ruth...now there's a great American Hero with his fair share of faults- but his faults were forgivable and in most cases kind of funny.
  25. We should all look back on the great Mr. Ford with dry eyes.