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Thinning the herd, how many cars are too much?


Rivguy
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I have found that it is easier to buy more cheap cars than to fix the ones that I already have. Since I like driving more than fixing, and I've always got good late model drivers around, the fixing gets put on the back burner. I've currently got four hobby cars. Of those one is a good driver, two need some work, but only one of the two was regularly driven, and one which is a complete project. Are there a lot of guys buried down in too many cars? 

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Mr. Rivguy, it depends on how much time you want to

spend with your hobby.  I try to get through a tank of gas

in each car every year.  That way, the cars get exercise

and the gas doesn't get old;  and the cars need less repair.

Have only enough cars that you can properly take care of.

 

Since you must have admired the cars when you got them,

consider farming out the work on the two that "need some

work."  That way you'll be able to enjoy them sooner.

And if you're handy, then get to work on your project.

You'll feel the burden lift when your two cars with

lesser needs are looking good and working well.

 

Remember, hobbies are supposed to be enjoyable!

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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I think I'm different than many or maybe most of you. For most of the last 20+ years that I've been buying/owning "antique" vehicles, I've generally felt that three old cars (the number I have currently) or more is too many. When I get three or four old cars, I usually feel overwhelmed...and I feel really relieved when I finally sell one of them. For some reason I'm not feeling that way now, and I think it's because one of the cars I own is a running functional project that's kind of stripped down out in the garage. I have a goal for that car. If I don't feel any purpose in owning it after I get it finished with it, I may want to get rid of one of my old vehicles. I don't know.

 

If I was a neglectful old car owner and was happy to let old Fords lie in limbo without being used or cared for, I would probably own ten or more, but I have a real problem owning anything that can't be used or isn't functioning properly or that I can't take car of, even cool old things. I don't have a lot of talent for mechanical restoration, but I am dedicated to maintaining antiques.  My mom had a few old mechanical wind up watches, and after she passed away I gave away the ones that couldn't be repaired. I don't use them, but since they work, I love having them. I also won't own any guns that don't work, even if they have historical value. I won't throw them away, of course, but I won't keep them. It's possible to feel like the things you own, in fact, own you. A good sign to divest of belongings.

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Rivguy said:

Are there a lot of guys buried down in too many cars? 

Just look on Youtube or websites that show the rapidly increasing amount of estate cleanouts and auctions. The boomers are now passing away seemingly way too fast, and many rural guys had buildings full of deteriorating cars or projects, or in briar patches. Piles of removed, but unmarked parts on shelves, piled in heaps on the floor, or in moldy cardboard boxes....Their Heirs mainly want the real estate proceeds, so much of it goes to scrap very quickly.

 

I am turning 70, living alone.  I have been doing my own ''pre-estate sale" all of this year and last year.  I'm doing OK getting rid of many parts and a couple of rough cars, considering a very dwindling sales market. I have only one son who has no indoor room for my stuff, even if he wanted it. 

 

I am down to only 4 vintage vehicles, and NO modern cars at all.  I drive a 1932 Ford as my primary year round car, and a 1966 4wd truck when I rarely need to carry something big.   The other 2 are projects, a 1932 Nash convertible sedan and a 1934 LaSalle rumble seat conv. 

 

My son was correct that I should force myself to finish the Nash first as it likely won't take too long, but he begs me to keep the basket case LaSalle as he knows that car was my only lifetime chance to own/drive "a big heavy rich mans car", and he reminds me of how much enjoyment was on my face when I drove the same exact model that I got running for the widow of AN ESTATE SALE.   My Nash also originally came from an estate sale!, the LaSalle's last 2 owners were both very wealthy, but never finished it before they too, passed away!   Am I painting a picture that is very easy to understand??

33 minutes ago, Rivguy said:

I like driving more than fixing

Just in the last 2 years (due to age concerns perhaps?), I went from preferring to work on tough projects and not driving them much, to suddenly not getting any enjoyment on trying to finish the 2 projects that I was saving.  I'm running out of sunsets, and it often seems foolish? to spend my last moments in a shop.

 

So, while in a deep rut some weeks ago, I drove my "daily" to the Rhode island ocean and I sat there for many hours...reflecting on what to do, or want to do....  No cell, no Triple A, no tools, no spare tire...but I just went, because I just had to be there once again. My Dad used to fish on the rocks exactly right there at Midnight-2am for Striped Bass...he just wanted to fish, not work on cars like he did for a living..

 

A long ago, late boss who also liked old stuff, once told me after he sold something that I thought he'd never part with... He said very coldly: "It's JUST Iron".

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Me? Weather permitting, I try hard to drive everything I own once a week, worse case once every 2 weeks. It pains me to see a car sit longer than that. I've found that owning more than a pair makes it too difficult to manage my routine, and really one is enough (sometimes more than enough!) For several years now my vintage vehicles have doubled as my "daily", possible because I rarely have to go anywhere during the week and my wife has a modern vehicle. 

 

At 50, 70 sure looks close. When I crest a hill I can squint and see it from here.  I know too many folks that age with a fine old car in their garage which, these days, does nothing more than gather dust while its belly is full of varnish, its brake fluid the color of a glass of strong iced tea. They still tell me they're getting to it, maybe in the spring. In the meantime they point out the (many) flaws in my "driver". As they go back inside and turn on their favorite news channel to while away the afternoon, I jump in, turn the key, and smile all the way home behind the wheel of a running, driving car.

Edited by Bryan G
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I'm not into the driving thing, Dad's Roadster last ran in 1983, and there are 20 years that have passed since the '12T was on the road. Look at them every day, lots of great memories. Two Model A bodies are my current projects, goal is to have them both done and in finish primer, then and only then work on building the chassis & engines. Soon to be 71 so that is the state of things around here. 

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Probably, the “too many” would be reached when the cars was so tightly packed together, in whatever amount of parking space I had, that I could no longer open the doors. This isn’t the case though, and it isn’t out of fear that my beneficiaries could not get rid of my collection without a big loss. Of prime importance in this consideration is the fact that I have no beneficiaries, and even if I did, could not care less since any profit from my estate is a positive balance in their checking accounts.

Rather, the collection I have assembled mirrors my abilities to divide my attention between the vehicles, and keep the diversity of the vehicles to a level I still enjoy working on them.

My 1927 Willys Knight Coach is completed to the point I keep a battery charger on it, crank it at least weekly, and drive it as often as possible.

My 1923 Dodge Brothers Roadster is a interesting car, a neat pass time to work on, started and ran at least weekly, fun to drive on short drives, but otherwise a spoiled, temperamental brat, with a insatiable need for attention. It really tends to get on my nerves sometimes, and clearly signals that it’s time to stand clear and leave it alone.

So, I have a user friendly, hound dog like, 1948 Ford 8N tractor which meets every qualification of being a classic vehicle, but will never be expected to do more than seven miles per hour, and is a obvious obstruction to traffic without the bother of adding turn signals and a brake light……..”Honey…watch the tractor…….he’s (turning) (stopping) and we don’t want to be eaten by his bush hog”!

And I now have my 1995 Ford F-250 with all its needs and idiosyncrasies to take up whatever time is left over from tinkering with the Willys, the Dodge or the tractor……….and it is all in fun because I can walk away from any of them without fear I won’t have a ride to work tomorrow……..being retired, that is.

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19 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

I'm not into the driving thing, Dad's Roadster last ran in 1983, and there are 20 years that have passed since the '12T was on the road. Look at them every day, lots of great memories. Two Model A bodies are my current projects, goal is to have them both done and in finish primer, then and only then work on building the chassis & engines. Soon to be 71 so that is the state of things around here. 

No need to explain. I have done up a 1958 Fan Travel Trailer, a 1972 Open Road motor home, a 1964 MG Midget, a 1950’s Ford F-1 pickup and a 1963 Mercury Meteor station wagon, and immediately after the time I drove them, I sold them, in the case of the Mercury Meteor, at a loss. It is the trip, and not necessarily the destination which makes the hobby enjoyable, and I simply love seeing others enjoy the fruits of my labor.

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10 minutes ago, Jack Bennett said:

I simply love seeing others enjoy the fruits of my labor.

Jack there was a time when I would have had a hard time understanding that. Now I can appreciate your thinking. I still enjoy driving them though. 

 

 

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Just now, Fossil said:

Jack there was a time when I would have had a hard time understanding that. Now I can appreciate your thinking. I still enjoy driving them though. 

 

 

Of course. Just cranking a engine for the first time in decades is a turn on, and cranking one I just finished building is ecstasy equaling a whole Saturday night of beer drinking. But, driving them is a reward, rather than a necessity, and I have two cars, each of which the previous owners never completed them to the point they were drivable. My old Dodge is a blast to drive, but I never venture so far from base it will be a inconvenience, even for a very good friend, to come pull it back home. One of the rewards I reserve strictly for myself in retirement is closely guarding my ability to keep my cars (and tractor) a hobby, and never let them become another job.

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I think your own intuition will tell most people when too many cars are too many for them. I've never felt overwhelmed by the cars in my life, but I don't generally keep more than 2 hobby cars plus our dailies at once, and my balance of work, usage and enjoyment of them is where I want to be. Before kids, we were heavy into motorcycles and had 8 in the garage at one point including a project bike I was working on finishing. My first born (who's now 12) began sucking up my playtime and most of the bikes slowly began disappearing as I simply was not using them anymore. Kept the one I restored, but properly mothballed it and havent ridden it in probably 5 years. We also have a sailboat, ATVs, and I play a fair amount of guitar, and I want to have time and balance for family plus all those things too. 

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Each persons idea should be different. For the average guy I would think about 3 running cars is on the edge. 2 might be ideal. A convertible and a hardtop. I see guys with cars double stacked and piled into storage buildings. I think to myself how does one take care of all those cars. Other than eye candy, they cant be enjoyed. My brother and myself had a couple dozen antique motorcycles at one time. Our philosophy was that they were easier to store and take care of than cars. So true, but there were 20+ bikes that were neglected. My brother has no children and would spend his weekends fettering with a couple of bikes at a time. But he had time to fool with them. I didnt and dont. I still have 6 in my garage collecting dust which is quite a diservice as they were all high end restoration, winning many awards. Now they are kinda just sad looking step children. I have an open invitation to put them on loan to a museum, just havent gotten around to it. That may not be the best place for them but better than where they presently sit.

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I currently have 4 cars that are over 50 years old, two that are 40 years old. Yes that's too many for me as I have to pay for off site storage, etc.

All but one are in roadworthy condition, and it is just about drivable. Can't wait to get rid of at least 4! Takes up too much time, money and rapidly shrinking ambition. This last 2 years have changed my mind about having old cars. Working  to support my habit isn't how I envisioned my retirement.

 By next summer I hope to actually have time to use my boat on Lake Erie more than the 4 times this year!

oct3lebarf250 036.jpg

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A lot of good stories in this tread that ring a bell with me.   Just reaching my 76th patriotic birthday with a down sized collection of only 5 

collector cars and a antique motor home, I see myself in a lot of these stories.   My wife of nearly 55 years and I discuss often which car, or

cars to keep when we downsize more.   Problem is they are all finished drivers now and we love touring.   The monkey wrench in the equation

is my two failed knee replacements.  I can't drive our 66 VW and need to lift my left foot onto the clutch in the 34 Ford and the 35 Ford pickup.

The 35 Buick is automatic with A/C, but a very small drivers compartment.   Consequently my go to car for errands and going to the store is

a modern 81 El Camino, which seems silly that a 40 year old car is special at all.

Saturday we went o the Pumpkin Festival and Pumpkin Roll in town in the 35 pickup and Sunday led a 11 antique cars on our annual Lesf Peeper Tour, and am paying the price today with my sore knees.   Physical Therapy, like walking and driving don't seem to be working.  2020 only got 4 nights in the motor home and none yet this year.   This 4th Quarter of life has been tough, but my old brain says I'm still young enough to do everything.   I keep hoping common sense will prevail, but so far I've only parted with our 57 Ranchero an one motorcycle.  Then I bought the motor cycle back, and I dream of buying back our 15

Model T.   I guess I'm just a crazy old man.

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Edited by Paul Dobbin (see edit history)
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"...how many cars are too much?"  As this hobby can attest... for some one is too many, and for others 100s or even 1,000s is not enough.

Just depends on who you ask.

 

For me less is more.  Best thing I ever did was "thin the heard" of cars, and sell/give away/throw away all the accumulated parts/magazines/memorabilia that became a storage burden and more importantly, weighed me down in mind-space, time and expense.

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For at least the last 20 years I have limited myself to two hobby cars at a time which have to fit in my garage along with our main DD. Both cars have to be totally driveable, I abandoned any project cars long before that. Even with these caveats I recently had to lease a storage garage to prepare a space large enough to do some longer term repairs on one of my cars without having to leave the DD outside. I am also affected by the spare parts glut problem mentioned above which I really need to address as I have a shed full for cars I no longer own. You have to manage your hobby just like you would manage a business.

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The most used, and hardest to lose muscle in the body is the brain. Over the years I have seen my circle of friends diminish, and recently the most influential person in my life, my wife of 57 years died. Many people who have reached a stage in their lives whereby they can afford the time, have the financial resources, and have acquired the skills to restore and collect old vehicles have passed their 50th birthday. And it is a hobby which has a magical effect on others regardless of their age. I do welcome the neighborhood folks, especially the tots and teens into my garage, and it does give my brain a chance to recharge as I tell them about a vacuum fed, gravity dependent, fuel system or a shaft driven water pump with its own universal joints.The external brakes with their mechanical linkages and clevis dependent adjustments is always good for a hour or two of wholesome gab.

And, very probably the most memorable minute of his four year young life was when I took my neighbors little boy for a ride around the block on my old tractor.

My little collection of vehicles is a statement that I have lived a life which now affords me the right to own and admire some pieces of historical artwork for no reason other than “I CAN”……….and they do open doors to some interesting, inspiring, and I hope, educational conversations with people whom I would otherwise have nothing in common.

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Love The Shirt Joe, I hope to be buried in one!😁

 

   I have no plans on "thinning the herd"  Actually I just had this container delivered & put behind the building for storage last week. I tore down the shed which was half the size of the container, so now not only will the yard equipment be in there, but plenty of room for lots of parts & one of the project cars that is further down the list. In spring I will insulate it, add electricity, heat & put the building matching metal on it as well as a sloped roof, so nobody will even know it is a container.  

 

God Bless

Bill

https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/nationwide-single-car-transport-hauling-open-or-enclosed.614419/

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Bills Auto Works (see edit history)
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"... thinning the herd". More thoughts.

 

I've helped liquidate 3 large estate of cars and part in recent years, two were family of car friends.  (100, 50 and 15 cars respectively). And we've all seen common "estate sales" in Hemmings, etc.

 

I respect their right for anyone to collect, own and keep whatever they choose, but I've seen first hand the fallout because of it.  Legal issues in particular, including local hoarding ordinances and lack of a will or trust.  If you're gonna be an uber-collector, treat your neighbors and family well by obeying local laws, and by providing a trust to help liquidate your prized possessions when you pass to that big garage in the sky. :)

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So far, any downsizing I've been doing are non-automotive items first (vintage radios, etc.) and then ancillary automotive-related items inside the house second; including sales merchandisers, signs, point-of-sale items etc., before getting to any vehicles.  They seem to be harder for someone else to liquidate than a complete car.  

 

Craig

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2 hours ago, Peter Gariepy said:

"... thinning the herd". More thoughts.

 

I've helped liquidate 3 large estate of cars and part in recent years, two were family of car friends.  (100, 50 and 15 cars respectively). And we've all seen common "estate sales" in Hemmings, etc.

 

I respect their right for anyone to collect, own and keep whatever they choose, but I've seen first hand the fallout because of it.  Legal issues in particular, including local hoarding ordinances and lack of a will or trust.  If you're gonna be an uber-collector, treat your neighbors and family well by obeying local laws, and by providing a trust to help liquidate your prized possessions when you pass to that big garage in the sky. :)

 

 

Facts like this make me wonder where all these hobby cars are going ? Since covid I have been quite isolated. British Columbia , Canada, so a vast distance to most of Canada, and an uncrossable border to  my almost next door neighbors in WA. State and Oregon. Pre covid I attended several P.N.W. swap meets a year, mostly in the U.S.

 Around here there are very few interesting cars on the market, prices are high and many seem to sell out of the area. 

 I would like to jetison some of my projects and replace with a decent running hobby car. Last summer saw 2 Model A projects leave and a couple of parts cars get scrapped out,   part of the jeteson process. 

 But it has been several years since I have even seen anything I would want to own for sale , let alone something that would be within my price range.

That is without the tripple upcharge of a weak $, border fees, and long distance transport costs.

 

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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5 hours ago, TAKerry said:

Ed, thats a nice looking boat, but but it sounds like you will be getting out of the fat and into the fire!

Thank you, and you are right! It's thirsty when it running, but sometimes I"m happy to just hang at the marina and not think about cars!!

studboat442 019.jpg

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36 minutes ago, Ed Luddy said:

Thank you, and you are right! It's thirsty when it running, but sometimes I"m happy to just hang at the marina and not think about cars!!

studboat442 019.jpg

I live right at the top of the Ches Bay. Very water oriented. I have never owned a boat but have friends that do. I have found over the years thats the best way. When I am asked to enjoy I will pay my way somehow. I love boats and being on the water, just have been able to say no over the years. I often joke that when I retire it will be to a small little shanty somewhere that I can have a boat. We'll see someday.

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I have one restored and running perfect, am about 2/3 way through a restoration. The car I am currently restoring was supposed to be a 'flipper'. The more I work and the more I seek perfection the more I plan on keeping it. I doubt I will list it for sale, however if the right situation and the right price comes up I may be convinced to let it go. Last spring I had 2 more fall into my lap. One should probably be sent to the crusher but through my eyes I see a beautiful,  new convertible with me enjoying a nice summer drive. It is currently in the planning stage of a restoration hopefully starting in the winter. The second is an old willys jeep that I would love to knock around in but realistically know that its about 4 or 5 years away from me starting so it needs to go.

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I have 2 old cars. It’s about the right number for me. I tried to be efficient and landed 2 cars that share a lot of parts and systems. A 1938 Chrysler and a 1938 Plymouth.  The idea is car is always up and running. Drivable. While the other is down for major repairs. Having both of my cars down for major repairs would bother me a bit. 
 

I don’t get overwhelmed by these 2 cars. Only feel somewhat snowed under when all the other vehicles, and powered lawn and garden stuff need repairs. October is a very busy month. I’m Winterizing seasonal engines. Preparing other engines for use. For example in October Alone, my actual get done list:

 

winterize lawn mower

 

winterize pressure washer

 

winterize weed whacker

 

winterize leaf blower

 

winterized RV trailer

 

Service diesel truck. Oil & filter and fuel filter

 

Service wife’s car. Oil and filter. 2016 civic. 

 

Replace thermostat & new coolant  2006 Mazda

 

Replace front suspension sway bar ends 2006 mazda

 

Prepare 11 hp snowblower for winter. Change oil. Replace transmission drive parts. 

 

Prepare ATV with snow blade. Service oil & filter.

 

Prepare 5HP single stage snow blower. Change oil. Replace rubber wear pads. 


install snow tires on wife’s car

 

install snow tires 2006 mazda

 

Add a week at the office for my job. In my spare time try and get some cruising time with my ‘38 Chrysler.  Also I am making good progress rebuilding the engine in my ‘38 Plymouth this month. Then I also create produce, edit & upload you tube videos to maintain my you tube channel. 
 

Looking at that list I realize why we don’t get out of the house very much. I was blaming covid.

 

I’m keeping my 2 old cars. The least of my worries. 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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19 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Mr. Rivguy, it depends on how much time you want to

spend with your hobby.  I try to get through a tank of gas

in each car every year.  That way, the cars get exercise

and the gas doesn't get old;  and the cars need less repair.

Have only enough cars that you can properly take care of.

 

Since you must have admired the cars when you got them,

consider farming out the work on the two that "need some

work."  That way you'll be able to enjoy them sooner.

And if you're handy, then get to work on your project.

You'll feel the burden lift when your two cars with

lesser needs are looking good and working well.

 

Remember, hobbies are supposed to be enjoyable!

 

This right here is all the secret you need!!

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All Relative... 

 

I say no more than you can service maintain drive & enjoy

 

lot of vehicles I like but i know i do not have the time for all of them. even if they run and drive, they will need service and maintenance !!

 

if I can not drive em and enjoy em don't want em,

 

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I have 5, which is one too many.  My principal interest is touring in really early stuff.  Until a couple of years ago I had a '14 T for Model T tours, backup on HCCA tours, and general knocking about.  I had a '12 entry-level Buick for big HCCA tours; it's down with a broken crankshaft at the moment.  I had an '11 10-horse Stanley for steam tours, and just because I'm nuts.  And I had an '07 single-cylinder Cadillac for 1-and 2-cylinder tours, which are my favorites (the Stanley qualifies, too).

 

In 2019 I added an '04 curved-dash Olds to take to the 2020 London-Brighton, a bucket list item for me.  We all know what happened to THAT bright idea!  I'm hoping things will be stable enough that I can take it to the 2022 tour.  Then I'll sell either it or the Cadillac; I love single-cylinder cars, but I don't need two of them.

 

I'm 85, my wife is 82.  We're still healthy.  We're  still in our house, and have room for these cars.  But I'm a retired life insurance actuary, and I'm quite familiar with mortality tables.  If I go downhill to where I can no longer drive them, I'll sell them.  If I die or get senile before I can sell them, my son can sell them; he used to be in the hobby before the boat bug bit him.

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4 hours ago, Peter Gariepy said:

I've helped liquidate 3 large estate of cars and part in recent years, two were family of car friends.  (100, 50 and 15 cars respectively)

 

I would love to hear more details about how this all worked.  (or didnt!) 

Was the widow knowledgeable about cars?   Did she/family insist on trying to break a value record on each car? Did the family want help but then interfered with what you were trying to do?

How much did you get "paid" to help with the sale?  (maybe paid with a car or parts?) 

Were the sales an auction or a series of advertisements?(who answered the phone?) 

If you were in charge somehow, what did you do about the bottom feeders who always come around? And who might have also been friends to you or the deceased.

 

What things worked? 

What things were a disaster?

 

I have 4 good friends - about 4-15 cars each. I have long wondered what I would do if I got a call from the widow saying "HELP!"   How would I handle it?  

What would I charge? (Free for a friend? I dont think so, moving iron is heavy hard work and everybody needs some reimbursement for your time) 

 

Who would I call? 

What should I put into MY estate papers? 

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I'm glad my question could spark so much conversation. Everything depends on your personal situation and the resources that you've got available. I'm a pretty low buck guy, always have been, maybe too much.  I don't think that I'm ready to invest much money in farming out repair. When I was a youngster I used to cycle through cars faster. The cars weren't really beat, this was over forty years ago, they just needed a little attention. I plan on getting rid of a couple of cars but it isn't easy to sell some of them. I suppose that they just have limited appeal. Buy low, sell lower! I hate to see a good car go to the scrapper. At least I'm not in any real hurry. I'm really enjoying spending time on these forums. 

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Two is the best number.  If both are running great, enjoy each. If one is up on the jack stands you always have the other to drive. It affords one time in repairing the problem, finding the correct parts, and doing it right.  Also, of the two have one that can keep up on the freeway. The other for country road running.  Depending on where I'm going determines what car I take.

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  All of my life I've mostly had projects mainly due to the fact that I couldn't afford (or was too cheap) to buy a nice driver. I also always thought if I was doing the work, it'd be better than someone else could've done it. I have spent less and less time in the garage over the last 10-15 years however and my thought process is evolving as I realize I won't be around forever to finish projects and if I want something to drive and enjoy, maybe I should just suck it up and buy something. I think of all of the time and money I've spent on various projects and think maybe I should've just bought something to begin with and how much driving enjoyment I've probably missed out on.

  Right now I have two projects and a driver. Actually at the moment I have 3 projects since I've got the driver partially torn down now to do some work to it. My plan moving forward is to get the driver fixed which shouldn't be too much trouble, sell one of the project cars and purchase a nice, well sorted (nickel era open car) driver to enjoy. I'll most likely keep one project around just to have something to tinker on when the mood strikes. What I think then would be perfect for me is three; two I can drive (one open car hopefully) and a project.

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11 hours ago, TAKerry said:

Each persons idea should be different. For the average guy I would think about 3 running cars is on the edge. 2 might be ideal. A convertible and a hardtop. I see guys with cars double stacked and piled into storage buildings. I think to myself how does one take care of all those cars. Other than eye candy, they cant be enjoyed. My brother and myself had a couple dozen antique motorcycles at one time. Our philosophy was that they were easier to store and take care of than cars. So true, but there were 20+ bikes that were neglected. My brother has no children and would spend his weekends fettering with a couple of bikes at a time. But he had time to fool with them. I didnt and dont. I still have 6 in my garage collecting dust which is quite a diservice as they were all high end restoration, winning many awards. Now they are kinda just sad looking step children. I have an open invitation to put them on loan to a museum, just havent gotten around to it. That may not be the best place for them but better than where they presently sit.

I have been to his garage and can vouch for the beautiful bikes he has . He is a great guy too. Helped me out of a little jam . Jim 

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