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Thinning the herd, how many cars are too much?


Rivguy

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Some great comments on here! In regards to my daily driver It's 9 yrs old, 96,000 miles. Still running and looking decent but had some maintenance done last month and it was in the shop for 2 days. No big deal but it made me add up how much $$ I have sitting in cars that seldom or never get driven. Then realizing I can't afford to replace it until I sell of a few of the oldies. That got to me for the 1st time. My monthly bills for the last 2 years spent on car parts and welder/painter shop charges is out of control for my budget/ income.

    Having worked in the car business part time I understand how easy these projects spiral out of control. More times than I care to remember guys would come in needing a family daily driver as there current ride was a rusty clapped out clunker and all they could yap about was the "classic car" home in their shop all in pieces. It was usually never going to see the road and if it did the wife and kids didn't fit or didn't like it. But most of the time they couldn't  get enough cash together to buy a safe reliable Daily Driver because they blew all the $$$ on chrome, cams, and stereos.

 Sheesh, it hurts to realize that is me now!

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I have two older cars, a 1952 and a 1980. Both four door sedans, both 6 cylinders.  1 automatic, 1 stick. Then 2 dailies, a 2012 and a 2016.  In the driving season I try to use the old cars as much as possible. Unless my wife is going then an air conditioned car is mandatory. Luckily both old cars run and drive well, only one needs cosmetic work which may or may not be done before I leave this mortal coil.  But they fulfil my desires for driving something a little different. And that is what I do with them. No longer go to shows or anything like that. Just drive.

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There are/were two separate individuals here locally with huge collections, each consisting of a good 60 vehicles or more each.  Both collections are organized and clean, but with a huge difference:

 

The one collector had his in about three separate locations, a big garage next to his house, a warehouse attached to the business that he owns, and a building on an acreage about 35 miles away.  (His reasoning to keep his collection in three different locations was, if something happened to one place, such as a fire, not all of his collection would be consumed.)  Each and every one of his vehicles are totally accessible at any given time.  Within an hour, he could have had one of his restored examples running and on the road, no matter which property it was stored.

 

In contrast, the other collector, with some mighty rare vehicles has his very tightly packed together inside two or three huge warehouses.   Some are stacked two or three high on racking, and others are on the floor, with only two or three inches separating them.  One cannot walk around them at all.   If he wanted a particular car, it would be a good 2-3 day job just to access it and get it on the road, which makes retrieving a 70 year old barn find look like child's play.

 

Now which collector do you think has "too many"?

 

Craig

 

 

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
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Two for me is right now, I really like ericmac's approach but we only have garage space for 3 cars now.  So one prewar, one postwar.  Both usable, the MB needs very little, and Model As are for tinkerers anyway. 

 

I could see 3 again, 2 drivers and a project is ideal.  The biggest reason we sold the T speedster project was space, and a plan for it to sit till time could be devoted to it.   I thought about disassembling it but in the end opted to simplify.  It went to a great home which is cool. 

 

Will see what future brings, but it's nice to get one of the new cars inside in wintertime.

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In my opinion, if you can't use them they are worthless and if you don't use them it won't be long until you can't use them.

 

I find my cars stay happy if they hit the road at least once every 2 weeks.  If they sit much longer than a month they get moody.  So, as many cars as you can drive in 2 weeks!

 

I have a friendly work commute... about 30 minutes on easy roads and I can see my back-row parking spot from my office window.  I try to drive the most ridiculous car I can on any given day.  It was 49 degrees and drizzling today... my '85 Mustang GT Convertible has good tires, good heat, good wipers... and as a bonus it was already dirty.  The Hurst shifter felt great in my hand at 7:30 this morning!

 

Also, once you start blocking cars with other cars, the wheels might as well be squares.  If you can get in any of your cars and use them, they are all useful.  If you have to move something, the car in back won't get out much.  At that point you either have too many cars or not enough space.

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I probably give a few moments of thought to some version of this question every day.  I'm not sure what that says about me but I suspect it isn't good.  There are times that I'm convinced that in retirement, I'll build the facility I've always wanted and have more cars than I currently do......(that was left vague on purpose in case my wife is snooping on here someday).  Other days, I find myself being more minimalistic and practical.  I am a tinkerer, more likely to spend more time doing little projects than driving them.  I love them as works of art, but I do love driving them.  There are days that I also am convicted about where the Old car hobby exists in my life.  Hobbies are important and fun, but they are not the most important thing.  I'm lucky to have a wife, family and friends who deserve more of my mental engagement than I give them sometimes.  Frequently it is the old cars that create that imbalance for me.  To be on this forum or other car sites, or tinkering in the garage is a well needed stress relief at times, but I do need to keep it in check and remind myself of other things that deserve my time.  I don't want the important people in my life to think that I like these old cars more than them.....  

As I get older, the tinkering side of me has me considering that 3-4 cars is plenty but I can scratch that itch with other fun things.  Recently I have refinished an old vintage dental cabinet, I just restored a 1950's barber pole, and stop light.  I am looking for a Visible gas pump to restore for my next project, I am also looking at a 1950s Vespa......  These smaller projects are easier to get to the finish line and may cause me to think about a smaller herd in my future.  That being said, I don't judge.....one car, or 100 cars.......make yourself happy.  

 

 

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1 hour ago, John Bloom said:

I probably give a few moments of thought to some version of this question every day.  I'm not sure what that says about me but I suspect it isn't good.  There are times that I'm convinced that in retirement, I'll build the facility I've always wanted and have more cars than I currently do......(that was left vague on purpose in case my wife is snooping on here someday).  Other days, I find myself being more minimalistic and practical.  I am a tinkerer, more likely to spend more time doing little projects than driving them.  I love them as works of art, but I do love driving them.  There are days that I also am convicted about where the Old car hobby exists in my life.  Hobbies are important and fun, but they are not the most important thing.  I'm lucky to have a wife, family and friends who deserve more of my mental engagement than I give them sometimes.  Frequently it is the old cars that create that imbalance for me.  To be on this forum or other car sites, or tinkering in the garage is a well needed stress relief at times, but I do need to keep it in check and remind myself of other things that deserve my time.  I don't want the important people in my life to think that I like these old cars more than them.....  

As I get older, the tinkering side of me has me considering that 3-4 cars is plenty but I can scratch that itch with other fun things.  Recently I have refinished an old vintage dental cabinet, I just restored a 1950's barber pole, and stop light.  I am looking for a Visible gas pump to restore for my next project, I am also looking at a 1950s Vespa......  These smaller projects are easier to get to the finish line and may cause me to think about a smaller herd in my future.  That being said, I don't judge.....one car, or 100 cars.......make yourself happy.  

 

 

I like your thinking here John. In my work as a psychologist I often talk with my patients about balance in life and the importance of maintaining it. Then as the words come out of my mouth I think "maybe just one more car..."

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1 hour ago, John Bloom said:

 

I probably give a few moments of thought to some version of this question every day.  I'm not sure what that says about me but I suspect it isn't good. 
 

  “I don't want the important people in my life to think that I like these old cars more than them.....” is a super important consideration. But, never forget that you are important to them too. Very probably one of the worse fears our dear ones face, as we age, is watching our brain surrender itself to Alzheimer’s, dementia or senility. The thought of a person you care about doing nothing more than sitting in a rocking chair, with spittle running down their atrophied face must be unbearable. On the other hand, a brisk discussion about why the brakes are mushy or the clutch is slipping on that old car must really be refreshing when the person doing the talking is a active person of age, and the love of his/her life is a interesting old machine. 
I am alone in life, for the first time in my life, and I do need to stay active to even have a reason to wake up each morning. My antique cars allows me the opportunity to spend time doing upholstery, paint touch up, minor, or major mechanical repairs, or simply taking one for a drive around the cemetery. I bought, and rebuilt a car hauler trailer which needs electrical system repairs, and, if really strapped for something to do, I can paint it again. About a month ago I bought a neglected 1948 Ford Tractor with a vicious, but non-operational brush hog. Last week I used the tractor to mow the eleven acre historic cemetery being maintained by my Masonic Lodge, and I will mow the activity field of  the local church when the weather gets a bit better. Having two antique cars, a old tractor and a car hauler trailer, I needed a truck to pull the trailer and haul my toys. So I recently bought a 1995 F250, and working on it will take me through the winter. And, the younger people who share my day have said, that, at nearly 80 years old, I am a inspiration to them, and they admire that I still work on my toys, and still show a interest in learning and life. I won’t buy another machine until I rehome something I now own……at least I hope I don’t.

7076781B-41C1-4006-BF92-E49701D1907E.jpeg

Edited by Jack Bennett (see edit history)
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6 hours ago, ericmac said:

I have thought about this topic a lot. My conclusion is for me three is the right number.  I like to have one a post '32 good driver, one a pre '32 driver and one project to give me something to work on. 

Great thread by the way!

Perfect! That is precisely where I think I need to be and I have just enough good, dry indoor space for exactly that. The pre '32 driver needs to be an open car. 😃

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Newer antique cars (for me, 1950's and up) 

I find easier to care for than my early one, a 1916.

I don't claim to be a mechanic and do only the

simplest things myself.  For those newer antiques,

I can call a mechanic on Monday and arrange to take

it to him on Thursday;  for the early car, I may wait

many months for a specialist.

 

So the amount of cars one can handle may depend

on the nature of the cars themselves---

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On 10/24/2021 at 11:06 PM, F&J said:

 

A long ago, late boss who also liked old stuff, once told me after he sold something that I thought he'd never part with... He said very coldly: "It's JUST Iron".

Just like a spouse is just a person.  Come on!  You love cars because they connect you to your youth and when you finish completing one you bask in a job well done - making something out of almost nothing.  No shame in that.  I think tinkering with a car is a fine way to spend the twilight years.  After all you are connected with more people on this forum that share the passion then you would be watching another sunset:) 

Edited by supercargirl (see edit history)
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My "thinning the herd" moment came in 2009 and 2010 when we decided to move to Hawaii. We had about 24 acres, a really nice big house, two stand alone garage/ shop buildings, and a 2500 square foot, 9 foot high basement under the house as well as a large barn and an "implement" shed.  We moved to a house over here that if I could trim off the roof peak, it would have fit in our Alabama basement and that 1st Hawaii house was also on a 6000 square foot lot in a subdivision. ( our 1st time not out in the country ).  As you  might imagine, there was a really serious thinning of vehicles... 13 cars & trucks, 22 motorcycles, 2 boats, 3 tractors with implements, and two car trailers.... and then, "stuff", and we've had 5 "yard sales" since we moved here, so I guess we're still thinning, ha ! Anyway, our huge "3 day" estate sale lasted from the 2nd day of May in 2010 until mid-December, and we were still giving away, throwing away, and hauling to the scrap yard. Yes, we had way too much, but we planned on living there forever and was always "fixing up" stuff to sell or trade up to something better that we couldn't or wouldn't afford any other way.  What of it do I miss ?  Only specific things occasionally in random talking sessions ( and then only while we're talking ) with folks that they would like to see or I would like to show them.  I got rid of stuff that I swore would never leave my possession, and really don't actually miss anything enough to wish or grieve for it back. Of course moving to "Heaven on Earth" has a lot to do with being satisfied, and if we were still over there, I'll bet we would have had even more piled up by now, ha ! Life is fun and has been superb for us, even with all the things that happen or go wrong, and we feel so fortunate to have arrived at this point in our 46 years of marriage. PLUS, we took thousands of pictures and kept interesting documents of most of our life and stuff ! Another thing that is very satisfying is that selling all our stuff and property let us pay cash for the house here, and us simple Southerners think: "if you don't have a house or car payment, you're rich", ha !

Edited by John Byrd (see edit history)
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I took a systematic approach to "thinning the heard" many years ago. I got much of my inspiration from https://www.theminimalists.com.

 

I'll paraphrase them: If you dont use something or it doesn't actively give you joy... GET RID OF IT!

  • My closet is virtually empty. Just what I wear. T-shirts, Jeans and shorts mostly. 6 pairs of shoes (3 of which I dont really need), 1 dress suit.
  • One set of socket wrenches.  (yes, really LOL)
  • I have no random car parts.
  • Car magazines are no longer piled up like the Leaning Tower of Pisa in my office.

Its quiet liberating.

 

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9 hours ago, Jack Bennett said:

7076781B-41C1-4006-BF92-E49701D1907E.jpeg

Jack, good on you.  I agree that having things to stimulate our mind are great and important to keeping us sharp and at our best.  It sounds like you are using the hobby to make you a productive guy who is a good role model for some younger guys.  I want to be able to do this too as I age.  One thing about me is that I don't "lack for hobbies".........  I know I will be busy.  Everyone should have a hobby that involves some problem solving.   Good Brain exercise.  I jumped back into playing jazz piano a few years ago after not touching it for a long time.  I think with about 10 more years of practice I'll be ready to play the Nursing Home Circuit....."Thank you so much, I'll be here all week, try the Veal........"

 

 

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13 hours ago, John Bloom said:

Jack, good on you.  I agree that having things to stimulate our mind are great and important to keeping us sharp and at our best.  It sounds like you are using the hobby to make you a productive guy who is a good role model for some younger guys.  I want to be able to do this too as I age.  One thing about me is that I don't "lack for hobbies".........  I know I will be busy.  Everyone should have a hobby that involves some problem solving.   Good Brain exercise.  I jumped back into playing jazz piano a few years ago after not touching it for a long time.  I think with about 10 more years of practice I'll be ready to play the Nursing Home Circuit....."Thank you so much, I'll be here all week, try the Veal........"

 

 

I am no good at giving advice, but sure have a huge collection of suggestions. Starting a tad more than a few years ago, I sat about a routine that every thing I done, whether in my shop, garage or around the RV, I moved at least one heavy thing from its perch or hanger above my head, to a location below my belt. I have a second level on my workshop which had a accumulation of 40+ years of old tools….e.g. a old, really heavy jig saw, and the super heavy extension table for my 1938 Craftsman table saw. I had motors, belts, planer wheels and Lord knows what for tools I’d cast off years ago. After a while of this rearranging and culling I found that I was better able to find what I was looking for, and was still able to use it without the fear of bringing a heavy tool down a 8’ 40 degree angle ladder. To shorten the story, I slowly, and purposefully restored my ability to continue doing woodwork and using my welder without having to go to the hospital with a out of joint (surgically replaced) shoulder, or a bad fall from a ladder.

OK…..here we are now……so where did we come from? 
I do have several hobbies including metal detecting, genealogy, carpentry, and of course my old cars. And my name “Jack” of all trades…..master of none says it all. I am “good” at a great number of things, may say a lot,  but am no expert at any single thing. And, I do goof up a bunch of stuff, and have unfinished projects anyplace I look.

If you still have the dexterity in your fingers to push the keys, the tolerance to set on your butt long enough to play a musical rendition of Do-Ray-Me, the bladder control to ….well, anyway, and the eyesight to read music, and you do have actual plans to play the nursing home circuit, or anyplace else, why wait ten years to start. These folks may have nothing to compare your expertise to, and some may have the most memorable experience of the remainder of their life if you let them play with you, or even help them stroke the keys…………..Go for it while YOU still can.

People in nursing homes, hospice care, or just unable to function publicaly may not have ten years, and, as my four year old neighbor may not like riding my old tractor when he’s in high school, he sure needed the experience as a young man to make a memory outside his tiny world.

As I would never allow a teenager to disassemble, and under some circumstances, even touch it, I can keep them captivated for a long time by explaining how the oil rectifier on my 1927 Willys works.

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1 hour ago, Jack Bennett said:

If you still have the dexterity in your fingers to push the keys, the tolerance to set on your butt long enough to play a musical rendition of Do-Ray-Me, the bladder control to ….well, anyway, and the eyesight to read music, and you do have actual plans to play the nursing home circuit, or anyplace else, why wait ten years to start. These folks may have nothing to compare your expertise to, and some may have the most memorable experience of the remainder of their life if you let them play with you, or even help them stroke the keys…………..Go for it while YOU still can.

Archie & Edith sitting at the piano right at the beginning comes to mind!!

 

Craig

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I have 11 collector cars ranging from 1909 to 1996. In the process of finishing a car barn we just had built on the same property of a house we bought six months ago and spent a fortune making livable to the bosses liking. This was after twenty years of having the cars 30 min away. Five cars are tour ready, two need just a couple items to be back on the road. Three need a few weeks of work and one is a project needing a engine rebuild. I am 63 and plan to retire next year and will have more time and a place 50 ft from the house to work on them and do more tours. I have no plans to down size much at this point just want to finally enjoy the cars more and get them all running. The house project put the car work back a bit still made time for local tours.   I do plan to sell parts from cars I don’t have. 

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On 10/26/2021 at 4:05 PM, Peter Gariepy said:

I'll paraphrase them: If you dont use something or it doesn't actively give you joy... GET RID OF IT!

 

I agree with ericmac about 3 cars.

I also agree with the above quote.

I have an addictive personality.

When I get interested in something i am ALL in.

Eventually I wised up and developed a plan: "If I haven't played with it for a year it's gone."

That plan has worked well for me.

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I'd been down to three old cars for around 3-4 years since we sold the 71 Riviera, sort by happenstance.  That felt pretty good and gave me money to restore a 41 Buick Roadmaster.  I got it all restored and suddenly realized it was too hot here in Florida most of the time to drive it anywhere and to top that there was no place to go and I was on the verge of being too old to trailer it.  Finally one day not long before Hershey I decided to sell it and I did.  It felt so good to be down to two old cars at first, my trust 1939 Buick Special and my 1991 Buick Park Avenue with 6,000 original miles on it.  I enjoyed to two empty spaces for awhile too and no money going out the door.  But, the money from the 41 Buick must have burned a hole i my pocket.  I though I needed one more car with A/C and power steering because the 91 Park looks almost like a 2005 Park...great for tours, not so old looking for shows.  Maybe I was selling myself a bill of goods, huh?  Anyway, I kept looking at old cars, mostly 1965-1968 Chyrslers because I knew them to be good looking, good cars with A/C and power steering.  I had a 66 Chrysler convertible when I first joined the AACA Board in 1995.  It was a real traveler.  Everything on line was crazy expensive, so on day I turned to Craigs List in Florida, so I wouldn't have to ship something here.  Looking for nothing in particular other than A/C and power steering and nice, I suddenly found a 1971 Dodge Swinger.....restored, with A/C and power steering.  I made an offer and it was accepted, so now I'm back to three old cars, two modern cars, a Suburban and a closed trailer, still with no place to go, at least short of 150 miles.  Why did I retire to this island in the middle of nowhere, Sebring, FL?  The Dodge is not my style, but I have history with a 1973 Plymouth Scamp that I bought new  and drove to California with two daughters.  That was before all the medicine and health support machines we have to carry now.  Maybe we can drive this car to car shows in places like Melbourne and Miami now....don't know.  We drove the Sububan to Hershey and sold a truckload of 1941 Buick small parts, and I'm saving it and the trailer hoping I can get the '39 Buick to Melbourne for the AACA Show in February and the Sentimental Tour in Gettysburg, PA next year.  Then we'll take it to Hershey one more time before I'm 84 next October and sell it.  I would have preferred a big Chrysler to the little Dodge, but at my age I think I have to worry more about the cost of gas in the next couple of years, and there is nobody around here for miles and miles who would work on a Dynaflow transmission.  Everybody stay well.  Getting old ain't for sissies as my late father used to say.

 

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5 minutes ago, alsancle said:

You can have as many non running projects cars as you can store.   But running/driving cars have to be maintained and exercised so that is a lot more work so I think the number for an individual person is a lot less.  

I find it difficult to drive each of my three cars once a month here where there is no place to go and tons of traffic to go anywhere.  I'd move, but it's too expensive, too many different doctors here, and one daughter who won't move is here.  I moved here because my restoration guy from Maryland days was here, but now he has passed away .  No clubs here, no old cars that aren't street rodded.  Take my advice if you're an old car guy, don't ever retire to south central Florida where it's over 100 miles to anyplace with old car interest or activity.

 

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48 minutes ago, Dynaflash8 said:

I find it difficult to drive each of my three cars once a month here where there is no place to go and tons of traffic to go anywhere.  I'd move, but it's too expensive, too many different doctors here, and one daughter who won't move is here.  I moved here because my restoration guy from Maryland days was here, but now he has passed away .  No clubs here, no old cars that aren't street rodded.  Take my advice if you're an old car guy, don't ever retire to south central Florida where it's over 100 miles to anyplace with old car interest or activity.

 

 

How about further north towards the lakes region and Mount Dora?   I've got a brother who just bought a house 20 miles off the coast south of Daytona.

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6 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

How about further north towards the lakes region and Mount Dora?   I've got a brother who just bought a house 20 miles off the coast south of Daytona.

If traffic is bad here, just try anywhere within 50 miles of Orlando.  We did try to find a place in or near Lake City where the climate and terrain was more like Virginia.  And there is a good AACA Region club there.  It's only 200 miles from our daughter, who works with old and very old people.  But, just after we started looking the COVID hit.  People from NY and NJ, not to mention deep south Florida started flooding to the place and prices went absolutely sky high.  Houses from the 30s and 40s were built to a much lower code than up around Washington, DC at the time and are rickity now.  And, everywhere you go, you have to check to see if it is in a flood zone.  Houses from the mid-fifties to the 80s/90s doubled and tripled in price within 24 months and still sold like hotcakes.  Also, if we did move, like back to Virginia, we'd have to get a mover who took everything down and packed it, and then put it all back together at the other end.  I can't handle moving furniture and household goods anymore.  We finally just gave up on the idea.  We moved to Virginia in 1993 from Maryland, and now we know we should have stayed there.  Those were the happiest days of our 62 years together, and I had 11 cars stalls there too, ha, only 6 here.

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On 10/26/2021 at 1:10 PM, supercargirl said:

....You love cars because they connect you to your youth and when you finish completing one you bask in a job well done - making something out of almost nothing. 

 

I agree. The past and American culture is what I'm most enthralled with about old cars. Old houses are too expensive...old TV's will only play new shows...Nothing lets me experience the past like driving one of my old cars down the hiway. The world was far from perfect back then, but there were so many positive things about life in America from 1945 to 1995. Some we appreciated back then and some we didn't.

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I have 4 cars that I bought because I considered them "antiques" (a 33 Ford, , 41 Olds, 50 Pontiac and 58 Rambler). Plus I have 2 more that "aged" in my family as my wife's and my own daily drivers and I never wanted to sell them because of this strange attachment to what was so much part of my daily life (86 Toyota and 87 Mercedes). I also purchased sedan bodies only, because for the price of a convertible I could get 3 of the sedans. All are driven at least monthly and all are kept as close to stock as possible and all look really well preserved and functional. Except the Mercedes, all are cars that were the regular drivers of middle class families, nothing fancy about them at the time.

 

My goal is to have 1 car from each decade  from the 1920s to 1980s. I prefer those cars that have some connection with my family history. I only had one project car ever, the Ford Tudor. It is a very good experience for any collector to have such a project ONCE in the lifetime!!  Projects do provide a great appreciation of the ingenuity and craftmanship of car builders of decades ago and is a fantastic learning experience. But once is enough for me.  More than one is only for a few who are able, motivated and financially strong. Otherwise, projects are never finished and cars get neglected until they are beyond repair or sadly liquidated after the death of the owner. I bought cars that are original, with good body and interior and then I did the mechanical repairs. This is a good strategy to have good looking working cars at a fraction of the cost of doing a project.

 

Sure, I am aging too, just signed up for Medicare, but my dad is now 95 and he keeps talking about how he learned to drive on a Whippet when he was 12 years old and he stil remembers all the mechanical features of the early Fords.  So we continue having these interesting conversations. For now, thinning is not in my plans. My interest in cars developed after he took me to antique car shows and parades in the 70s and early 80s. This is a good bonding activity that is rewarding if we can keep it within the realm of what it is: A hobby to enjoy driving old cars and not the master of our life and budget.

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I find the cost of keeping cars on the road prohibitive, with the cost of insurance , road tax , maintenance etc , so I have to make choices , I have two daily drivers , but two running classics but only tax and insure one currently a 72 stag , so my 190 merc just sits and waits 18 months now . I have a two tatty projects , that I intended to restore a 62 Austin Healey sprite and 68 mgb  , but sadly covid has made labour and parts so expensive reluctant to start , so afraid probably will sell for scrap.

Therefore when I read of collections of 15 and often more , I think surely they are not all road legal and owner probably has to make choices too , unless they own an estate to drive round , but if they do, car running costs probably not an issue anyway . I say good luck , lucky chaps.

 

Bring the white Rolls round James my good man . 😊

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1 hour ago, Pilgrim65 said:

I find the cost of keeping cars on the road prohibitive, with the cost of insurance, road tax, maintenance etc... 

 

Pilgrim, where are you located?  Do I recall correctly

that you're in Malta?

 

Here in the United States, insurance for an antique car

is minimal--maybe $100 a year for the typical car, since

antiques aren't driven much and are very well cared for.

 

And what is a road tax?  How much is it?

In my state, friendly to antique cars, once you register

the car for about $75, it's good for life--as long as you

care to own the car, there are no other registration costs

or taxes on it, unless you count the tax on gasoline.

 

Indirectly, you make a good point:  A friendly antique-car

environment really helps the hobby and encourages

participation.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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18 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Pilgrim, where are you located?  Do I recall correctly

that you're in Malta?

 

Here in the United States, insurance for an antique car

is minimal--maybe $100 a year for the typical car, since

antiques aren't driven much and are very well cared for.

 

And what is a road tax?  How much is it?

In my state, friendly to antique cars, once you register

the car for about $75, it's good for life--as long as you

care to own the car, there are no other registration costs

or taxes on it, unless you count the tax on gasoline.

 

Indirectly, you make a good point:  A friendly antique-car

environment really helps the hobby and encourages

participation.

 

Hi John , I’m located in Cyprus for 8 months a year remainder in Uk 

costs in Cyprus for my stag , insurance 300dollars and to drive on road government charge road tax 70 dollars 

my last classic in Uk was a Mga last year , insurance 400 dollars , as was a 1960 was exempt from road tax , USA certainly sounds classic car hobby friendly 

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20 hours ago, Pilgrim65 said:

I find the cost of keeping cars on the road prohibitive, with the cost of insurance , road tax , maintenance etc , so I have to make choices , I have two daily drivers , but two running classics but only tax and insure one currently a 72 stag , so my 190 merc just sits and waits 18 months now . I have a two tatty projects , that I intended to restore a 62 Austin Healey sprite and 68 mgb  , but sadly covid has made labour and parts so expensive reluctant to start , so afraid probably will sell for scrap.

Therefore when I read of collections of 15 and often more , I think surely they are not all road legal and owner probably has to make choices too , unless they own an estate to drive round , but if they do, car running costs probably not an issue anyway . I say good luck , lucky chaps.

 

Bring the white Rolls round James my good man . 😊

 

 

The 62 Sprite is very simple . And unless a total rust victim, quite reasonable to restore. Great parts availability and for the most part about as cheap as anything out there. Gearboxes are fragile as is the rear end. A number of gearbox swaps are out there, and the rear end is addressed by using 1969 and up { 1275 engine rather than 948 } rear end and axles.  Not bullet proof but a big improvement  for very little expense. If need be lots of aftermarket chrome moly axle shafts are also on the market.

 MGB's are also pretty simple cars , but can be more expensive. Either make great projects. Not a big fan of Stag's. The engine can be lots of trouble and expense. Much prefer the MGA. MGB, Sprite , Midget cars.

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Now, how about some recommendations on

how NOT to have to thin the herd?  Maybe some

forum-goers have good ideas on maintenance or storage.

We all want to do more and better things!  And maybe

INCREASE the collection a little bit, too.

 

My tip:  I try to get through a tank of gas every year

in every car.  Periodic usage helps maintain a car,

so I enjoyably drive my cars often--to events or for

scenic jaunts to exercise them.

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In a non-pandemic year I try to take each of my cars on at least one, 3-day or longer, tour with HCCA, VMCCA, one of the Model T clubs, or a steam tour.  Plus I do a lot of local puttering to Cars and Croissants, or just go to yoga, the bank, to get ice cream or pizza or lunch or a haircut.  LOTS more than a tank a year!

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