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plymouthcranbrook

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plymouthcranbrook last won the day on February 10

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About plymouthcranbrook

  • Birthday 12/10/1950

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  1. I can't imagine a V8 from 1934 not having an electric starter. Now working
  2. Many add an electric 6 volt pump near the tank to use when this occurs. It will push fuel into the carb. You can also install a spacer to isolate the carb from the manifold to help reduce heat. You can make a shield for the fuel pump and install it over the pump as was suggested. My 52 doesn't have one but I have never had a problem with vapor lock. Stop by here for more information: https://p15-d24.com/
  3. Yes it looks correct. Plymouth flathead(or similar Dodge etc.) and the floor shift trans would be correct for a truck and maybe a car of that era.
  4. While true there are not a lot of them around that truck might need everything up to and including the proverbial kitchen sink. I am not clear if the engine in the bed is the engine for the truck or a spare. Price is too high in my estimation either way.
  5. The whole badge engineering thing began in the 60’s with Valient/Dart, Falcon/Comet as well as some GM cars as well. Remember the brewhaha over GM using Chevy engines in other Makes. Hell and lawyers to pay. As I said and I am sure many of you did as well, why buy an expensive Buick when you can get the same basic Chevrolet for hundreds less. Which led to the eventual elimination of whole car divisions.
  6. I understand you joe. I was being factious with my remark. Not advocating someone actually do it.
  7. Whenever I see a car like that that looks good I can’t help but wonder why it has been sitting for a long time.
  8. Critical is good. I do think from what I can see it is basically nice. That said for that kind of money I would either have to see it in person or a whole lot more information and pictures. It is worth looking into if you wanted one. This is one case where being rare is true and might help a sale if someone really wants an old Plymouth station wagon.
  9. It does look pretty nice although I never owned a Mustang of that era I did have a fiend who had two both six cylinder automatics. I would look very carefully at the rust areas even though they appear to be surface in the photos. The other thing that might or might not drive you a little nuts is the dual exhaust dumping out in front of the rear wheels. If the engine is loud it can really be annoying on anything but short trips. Another ask me how I know question. It all comes down to price and desire. If you really want this car it is easy to rationalize away any problems or potential issues. Another ask me how I know thing. Taking into account what m-mman has said(and the fact that if you drive carefully some of that can be lived with like the transmission) and if the price for a modified vehicle is reasonable enough to give you some leeway for what will need to be fixed you could certainly do worse.
  10. Well I don’t know if this qualifies as an interaction or not but back in the late 70’s at Road America both Mario Andretti and Danny Ongias at separate times bent down to talk to my then 1 year old son in his stroller in the paddock. As a National tech inspector for SCCA I saw and spoke to several car folks briefly although most of the big names had someone else bring their cars to tech inspection. I do remember one of my female co-inspectors saying how she couldn’t wait to tell her friends that she had had her hands on Paul Newman’s underwear.
  11. I think the part about your local dealer has a lot to do with what make of car and where you buy it than most anything else. We have bought our last two cars from the Kia dealer in the next town. First a 2012 Soul new and last year a used Chevy Traverse. They have been consistently honest and straightforward in our interactions with them. If they are pulling any tricks I haven’t caught them and like most here I have bought a lot of cars over the years. Even the Service Dept is good. What GM and the other manufacturers did by eliminating so many small dealers was to eliminate the human connection that rocketrader mentioned. With mostly bigger fewer dealers Farther away I believe it is helping drive folks to companies like Carvana. Another thing that has hurt sales is the one size fits all type of car. Few options and most bundled into expensive packages. Easier to build cars all alike but less personalized for each owner. Although I read a bit on Allpar that packed Dealers lots might be becoming less common and ordering a car might return to more of the norm. We’ll see if the instant gratification generation goes for that or not. Just remembered where I read the story about Ford so I will link it here so if anyone wants to see it they can: https://www.allpar.com/threads/ford-moving-toward-build-to-order-away-from-packed-dealer-lots.239002/page-2#post-1085271996
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