dl456

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About dl456

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  • Birthday 03/20/1959

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  1. Oldford thanks for the heads up. Jon, I sent you a PM. Thanks for the input. Dennis
  2. Jon, Is there a particular carburetor that you would recommend. I have been looking for a correct replacement since before Hershey and have not come up with anything. I kind of get the idea that your not a big fan of the Penberthy anyway. Thanks, Dennis
  3. I figured I might count on carb king for a response. Thank you. The BB1 is a straight flange and 2-15/16'' centers. These flange bolts are 90 degrees off from the manifold. The home made adaptor that came with the car was a piece of 1/2'' steel crudely fashioned to remedy this. I couldn't leave it on there. Is your replacement adaptor 2-15/16'' centers on manifold and carb flanges? Would it rotate the BB1 90 degrees? What are your thoughts on re-installing the BB1 with a correct adaptor? Thanks again, Dennis
  4. Hello, I am looking for a carb to use on my 1920 Studebaker big six. It originally had a B&B SV29. I couldn't locate one so I built up a Stromberg LS-2 . It appeared like it would fit, but the float bowl to block clearance is 0. When I bought the car it had a BB1 installed on a home made adaptor plate I would have no issue using the BB1 temporarily if I could find the correct factory adaptor. Looking for suggestions. Thanks, Dennis
  5. Hello , Looking for a Ball & Ball SV29 Carburetor for my 1920 Studebaker Big Six. Thanks, Dennis
  6. Mark, Just replied to your PM. Let me know. Dennis
  7. Mark, Mine is a 1922. A bit different than yours as it also had a locking cylinder shield with only a small round hole to insert the key. Mine also used a Yale cylinder but Johnson also used some Sargent and Briggs according to my research. They were more security conscious than you might think. The bottom pins have small rings in them making it near impossible to pick. These rings will stick In the upper chamber indicating a false shear line. With the limited visibility due to the cylinder shield, and the security pins, I finally through in the towel and drilled mine. And I don't give up easy! Before you drill, remove the shifter tower from the transmission and disassemble the forks and gate. You will see the lock rod and the bar that locks the gate. Make sure this whole assembly is free and not gummy or stuck. Even with an incorrect key , you should be able to see some slight movement in the cylinder indicating that the cylinder is not stuck. The good news is my cylinder was brass and not die cast. With the cylinder exposed like yours, It should be easily picked and a correct key made if necessary. But you can't pick a frozen cylinder. My cylinder only had a number 44 on it and my Johnson tag was half missing. Not enough for a code book. Good luck. Dennis
  8. Larry, Thanks for the PM . I will follow up and let you know. Hugh, Thanks for the pictures . Much better than going in blind. Hope you all had a wonderful Thanksgiving. Dennis
  9. Thanks for the reply Hugh, I'll look for the screw. I looked for the letter and numbers and they are non-existent or at least not legible. My cylinder is in the side of the shift tower. Do you know if the cylinder will come out with the screw removed in the locked state? Thanks again, Dennis
  10. Hello all, I have another question. I bought this car with the shifter locked in neutral and no key. I believe I could pick this cylinder but it would be nice to know if the cylinder rotated clockwise or counter clockwise to unlock. My books showed a Briggs key blank number but it does not fit the keyway. I have a Yale blank that fits the ignition but won't fit the shifter. Anybody know the key blank numbers? Should the shifter and the ignition switch be the same key? Should I just go ahead and pull the shift tower and remove the cylinder? Any advice? Obviously I'm not going anywhere too soon but would like to see if the car shifts through the gears. Thanks, Dennis
  11. Larry, That is the car from Roaring Twenties. We believe it to be a 22 - 54 sport roadster. It has Houk wires, 124" wheelbase and a clock built into the speedometer. It's a fairly honest car with a few warts. I would be interested in the parts motor should you come across the contact info. Thanks, Dennis
  12. Thanks Morgan, That makes sense. You said 19-21. Is 22 different than these? Dennis
  13. Thanks guys, So it looks like 19-22 and maybe 18? I have welded a lot of cast iron with success but it seems like "stitching" is the preferred method. Years ago when I worked in the welding shop, we had a heat treating oven to bring the temp. up, weld and then cool slowly overnight. I don' t have that capability now. Terry, When Mark mentioned "plug sealed" was he referring to stitching? Are you happy with the repair? (Edit: Found the thread. You Buick guys are awesome!) Thanks, Dennis
  14. Mark, I have plenty of time. I have two projects currently. They won't be done until summer 20 or thereabouts. Morgan, Is the 18 the same? I believe they have a hole between the jugs and this one is solid. Is there a date range where these cylinder blocks would be the same? This is my first pre war Buick. Please educate me. Thanks, Dennis
  15. Hello Ray, I also don't believe this crack is "fatal". It is in the bottom of the water jacket on the drivers side in an area that I am sure the casting is somewhat thin. Just testing the waters in order to make a decision (repair or replace). I would like to weigh all my options. That's why I would like to know compatibility of the cylinder blocks through the years and if any are available. Obviously, if they are extremely scarce, I only have the one option. I'll get some photos this weekend. Thanks, Dennis