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Any modern cars you admire, or aspire to acquire?


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20 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Little known fact:  At least as late as 2010, General Motors

would do custom colors at the factory.  My local Chevrolet

sales manager didn't know GM did that, but in 2014 I interviewed

Bob Lutz for our AACA regional newsletter, and he told me this

fact directly.  (He's a big car fan and was Vice Chairman

until 2010.)  Later on, he told me that that custom-color

program might not be currently available, but he had been away

from GM for several years and didn't have the latest knowledge.

 

But custom colors at GM, at least as late as 2010?

That must have been a program that even ardent car fans

didn't know about.  That opens up a lot of interesting possibilities!

I do know Ford will paint a car or a truck a custom color, but its VERY expensive; especially for one unit.   Then again, Porsche's 'Paint to Sample' paint program starts at something like a $4500 cost adder.  One of those PTS Porsches here----------->   https://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/forum/your-studebaker-forum/stove-huggers-the-non-studebaker-forum/16241-interesting-items-at-the-british-car-show

 

Not sure now, but Ford in the 1960's and 1970's had a Fleet catalog with something like 200 color chips inside in all colors of the spectrum, plus various shades of cream/tan/ browns and several shades of gray, including all the Federal Spec. 595 colors for GSA vehicles. 

 

One of these fleet orders that I know of were 97 1969 Cougars delivered to Rocky Mountain Life Insurance Company.   http://www3.telus.net/nowland/site/index.htm

 

Craig

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Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
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The only vehicle on my radar right now would be the new C8 Corvette!  Unfortunately, you cannot buy one with a manual transmission!  I like the whole idea of a mid-engine sports car but I'm concerned how easy it would be to get in and especially out of!  Current daily driver fleet includes a 2015 Holden SS with a MANUAL Transmission and an LS3!  My wife's daily...  My son drives a 2006 Chrysler 300C with a HEMI (my dad's last new car before he passed away in 2012).  My daughter drives a 2000 Jeep Cherokee with 208,000 miles, but it runs great, passes both safety and emissions, and has no check engine lights on!  My two daily drivers include a 2005 Suburban with 125,000 miles and a 2001 Dodge 2500 with a 5.9 Cummins with about 44,000 miles.  Happy that I can maintain and typically repair everything! 

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Agree with Matt.  Anything new or close to new has the same chances of being a good long term investment as cars have historically been, very very unusual.

 

With that out of the way, obviously some of us find some newer stufc interesting.  I will likely spend my disposable/hobby $ on old cars, but have thought from time to time how cool it may be to buy a car you really like new and keep it long term.  I would drive vs. Stash away, the F type Jag comes to mind.  But tough to justify when its financially generaly a better move to go with any number of collector cars for same buy in.

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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Problem with a '69 Z28 was it was 4-speed only and no AC. I could have bought a leftover 69 in 1970 for $2995 asking ,was in the back of the lot and dealer wanted it gone. Have seen several cross auction blocks without the mandatory bumper option.

Instead I orderedt a '70 Buick GS455 with four speed, posi, gauges, and AC. in Wilderness Green and tan interior. Had the dealer replace the stock 15" tires with dog bone Dunlops. Autocrossed very successfully.

Suspect what was really meant was that you could order a car with any color that was in the GM inventory (cars with Cadillac Firemist colors were common).

Today's cars do not have not many two doors (had a couple of two door wagons, liked the Astre the best, think I still have the Nomad panels, somewhere...).

Have a 2nd gen CTS coupe. Be hard to convince me the designers weren't German.

 

Had a Crossfire Coupe with 6 speed and retractable spoiler. Were made in Germany for people under 5' 7". I carved 2" out of the non-structural rear bulkhead (was for the tonneau linkage in the SLK), reformed the seat for my screwy reclining driving position, and replaced the dead pedal with a plate. Three hours to south Florida was comfortable.

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Modern cars don't light my fire.  If I aspired to one, I guess it'd be a Challenger or a Mustang.  I like the retro styling - cop-bait red of course and enough HP to destroy the rear tires.  Like Matt Harwood said, probably too many will be preserved for them ever to be collectible, so I'd just have fun driving the heck out of it.  But my hot rod days are over.  Like everybody else, I'm into SUVs and pickups.  And yes, they're just appliances - as long as they're comfortable, utilitarian and reliable, I'm good.  I still like red though - my one concession to "sportiness".  My next vehicle likely will be a Hyundai or Kia "cute ute" - mainly because they're decent cars for the money and the warranty might well outlive me.  If I was going to get a pickup, it probably would be a Frontier.

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22 hours ago, GregLaR said:

This is probably the only newer model that appeals to me. 😄

 

source.gif

 

 

I always figured when George's flying saucer folded into a briefcase it would be to heavy for him to lift - or maybe it had an anti-grav device.  🤣

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If it has wheels, I love it.

 

as far as modern cars go, here are a few

 

I would love a 2002 E55 AMG - the wheels that year are the best.

 

any new Corvette, they are amazing machines and I’ve always considered them the ultimate American car

 

I also really like the idea of a Grand Cherokee Trackhawk.  707 HP AWD.  


The problem with be ever purchasing a newer vehicle like these is that I hate buying anything that I can’t sell for at least what I have in it.  I have a company car for work, and my wife drives a 2002 MDX that we’ve had since 2005.  We will drive that until the wheels fall off, then put more wheels back on it.  I bought a brand new truck in 2002 and immediately realized how dumb that was.  I’m not a new car customer.  

 

 

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18 hours ago, hidden_hunter said:

 

Obviously I'm biased, but GM's half hearted effort with the G8 doomed it for failure - Holden were finally making a car that for the segment and price truly was market leading, even the basic fleet v6 versions we had for work drove quite nicely and they were available in a variety of body styles. A lot has been written about it already, but they had a bunch of different brands and approaches they could have taken to sell the car and they did a woeful job of it.

 

 

 

You mentioned a 'variety of body styles'.  One was the 'ute' which would probably have gone over quite well in US. Basically a Corvette pickup - 6.2 litre LS engine etc.

 

Just one of many variations from HSV (Holden Special Vehicles) - this one is a 2017 - an HSV Maloo GTS-R. Photo taken in Methven, NZ, 29 December 2019.

 

Btw I have no particular desire to own one though.

 

 

 

 

 

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I already have the modern car that I wanted, it took awhile to get there but now I am very happy. In early 2018 we owned a 2012 Mazda CX-9 and a 2016 Chevy SS sedan. Both very nice cars but I found I did not drive the SS often enough due to the necessary utility of the SUV. I still have a need for speed which the SS satisfied and I had considered the Mopar Hellcat variants but they were just too uncontrollable. Then in 2018 Dodge solved my problem by creating the Durango SRT. 392 Hemi, 475 hp, 0-60 in 4.4 seconds, 13.2 quarter mile at 103, Brembo brakes, all wheel drive, every option included and seating for 6. I traded in both cars for the Durango and so far it is the best vehicle we have ever owned. It is a comfortable cruiser, a scary fast ride when you want it to be, and a very capable and safe utility vehicle. Not many around, I highly recommend it.

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5 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Agree with Matt.  Anything new or close to new has the same chances of being a good long term investment as cars have historically been, very very unusual.

 

With that out of the way, obviously some of us find some newer stufc interesting.  I will likely spend my disposable/hobby $ on old cars, but have thought from time to time how cool it may be to buy a car you really like new and keep it long term.  I would drive vs. Stash away, the F type Jag comes to mind.  But tough to justify when its financially generaly a better move to go with any number of collector cars for same buy in.

 

Agreed, better to own a slowly depreciating asset like an antique car than a quickly depreciating asset like a new car.  Our cars may be on a slow downward trend, but at least they don't half in value over the 1st 4-5 years of ownership.

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On 1/15/2020 at 3:19 PM, John_S_in_Penna said:

I like the Porsche Boxster,

Seeing you can not do an oil change on one of these at jiffy lube or such place where only the dealer can. I highly doubt they will ever be restored becoming through away like your average dishwasher. 

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30 minutes ago, Joe in Canada said:

Seeing you can not do an oil change on one of these at jiffy lube or such place where only the dealer can. I highly doubt they will ever be restored becoming through away like your average dishwasher. 

If jiffy can't do a simple oil change, fuel filter, spark plug, air filter. etc. they shouldn't be in business. Easy job if you know what you are doing. Any big  repair on the engine the engine just drops out the bottom. VW's and Porsches have been doing that for decades. 

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19 hours ago, capngrog said:

 

Now THAT is a good looking car.  Does it drive as great as it looks?

 

Cheers,

Grog

The car is a great driving and handling car. Very solid build quality. It drives like a Mercedes should when you are just cruising around town, then when asked for it is an animal and still drives comfortably. All depends on the driving modes. Lots of options to play with for track, highway and street. The sounds it makes are right out of hot rod heaven when you want.  I am an ex SCCA racer and this car does it all.

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22 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

but will likely buy one off lease which works great for me.

 

About 60% of new car "sales" are lease now. And a clean, low mileage, babied 36 month lease turn in has a price of about 60% of new. There are some great cars out there.

 

In four weeks I will have two years owning this 2003 V12.

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I have a little over $10,000 in it counting just under $1,000 in diagnostic tools to keep an eye on the 140 computers. It is one of 700 of the 12's imported into the US at $125,000 that year. I love it. Great price because people are scared to death to own one. I bought it as a daily driver for my decade of my 70's. Probably going to keep it longer.

In 1974 I started working with operational output computers as my daily job so I am excited and intrigued by the technology.

Daily driving my wife's Tahoe. The BMW is in the garage on the lift and I have been polishing the waffled aluminum heat shields along the exhaust. My wife seams to be figuring out that I may have used the term "daily driver" a little loosely. I heard her muttering to herself.

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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20 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

There will just be too many really nice, well-optioned, really fast late-model muscle cars laying around in perfect condition. The good news it'll be great for price and availability and hopefully people will continue to enjoy them. 

 

And they will still be desirable.

There are still a million Ford Model A cars out there and yet they are still desirable and still bring a lot of money for what they are.

 

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12 hours ago, 8E45E said:

I've run out of hands and fingers to count how many ultra-low mileage 1978 Corvette Pace Cars and 25th Anniversary cars are around despite them being over 40 years old now.

 

Craig

 

This is another case where there are probably more now than ever produced.

 

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8 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Agree with Matt.  Anything new or close to new has the same chances of being a good long term investment as cars have historically been, very very unusual.

 

With that out of the way, obviously some of us find some newer stufc interesting.  I will likely spend my disposable/hobby $ on old cars, but have thought from time to time how cool it may be to buy a car you really like new and keep it long term.  I would drive vs. Stash away, the F type Jag comes to mind.  But tough to justify when its financially generaly a better move to go with any number of collector cars for same buy in.

 

I didn't think we were talking about investments.

I thought this was about desirability not something to replace your 401k.

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I have had a thing for v12 bmw’s from the 80’s for a while. I don’t know why I like them, but they are about the most modern car I can get excited about. On Christmas Day a buddy handed me a signed title to a very nice looking ‘89 750 that hasn’t been on the road in years. I can’t wait to catch up on some other problems enough to bring it in the shop and find out why it won’t hold any transmission fluid. 

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My point exactly Zeph - 35 Pack articulated my point better than I could.  

 

My thought not so much investment but if I am looking at a new F type vs. an older car, for same buy in purchase price, ins., prop tax & lower depreciation make the antique generally a better proposition financially, but not an investment in either scenario.

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1 hour ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

 

 

In four weeks I will have two years owning this 2003 V12.

FathersDay.thumb.jpg.cbe689d7b773b8c5658cfe3781b776d2.jpg

 

 

Daily driving my wife's Tahoe. The BMW is in the garage on the lift and I have been polishing the waffled aluminum heat shields along the exhaust. My wife seams to be figuring out that I may have used the term "daily driver" a little loosely. I heard her muttering to herself.

Bernie

Now that's funny! 😁😁

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3 hours ago, Pfeil said:

Easy job if you know what you are doing.

If you have the access to the software and seeing only the dealer can restart it after the work is done. The car is cheap it is the service charges that will kill you. 

 The average cost for a Porsche 911 oil change is between $494 and $515. Labor costs are estimated between $32 and $41 while parts are priced between $462 and $474. Estimate does not include taxes and fees.

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)
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3 minutes ago, Joe in Canada said:

If you have the access to the software and seeing only the dealer can restart it after the work is done. The car is cheap it is the service charges that will kill you. Just go price an oil change and you will see why there are so many newer used ones on the market. 

 

BMW have the service data in the computer, and you can reset it as an end users - e.g I got my brakes done at the local brake shop and replaced the wear sensor myself then you just hold down a button when you start the car to access the resets for everything.

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Matt is Right ..!

Here is what i call my daily boring vehicle,

Since i own this one (6 yrs) NOTHING when wrong.. not even the power hand crank window motor..(me)... I'm A car mechanic . and i DON'T trust any modern computerized vehicle..

i when 6 times to Toronto from CA on one like this and 2 times on this one ..not one issue.

this are the simplest an most reliable vehicles.. anything from 1980 back is my favor car.!

And ...Since i need it a pick up truck ... I made myself one..!20181020_094939.thumb.jpg.521354d8615ffefbb39bf264c9e573be.jpg

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25 minutes ago, Joe in Canada said:

If you have the access to the software and seeing only the dealer can restart it after the work is done. The car is cheap it is the service charges that will kill you. 

 The average cost for a Porsche 911 oil change is between $494 and $515. Labor costs are estimated between $32 and $41 while parts are priced between $462 and $474. Estimate does not include taxes and fees.

I'm a car guy, retired from a auto manufacturer ( engineering) after 34 years, before that I was a dealer Tech and also a flight engineer USNR.

Most car guys I know work on their own cars, those that don't or don't know how have big money or they don't get the job done  or loose interest fast.

Since when does 9 quarts of oil and a cartridge oil filter cost $462.--$474.00 ???  

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I have always wanted one of these since they were brand new (1990) and finally purchased this one in 2009, a 1991 with 28K on the clock. It is the most fun of any (old or new) car I have ever driven and I will never give it up

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I like lots of modern luxury cars as well as muscle cars. Modern muscle fav of mine is the Challenger R/T. Just a base 5.7 Hemi is enough for me.  SRT, Yes but insurance and temptation to stomp on it, get another speeding ticket I can't justify. The Charger R/T is the same, but better ride. Seats suck, so gotta go for the Daytona or SRT to get the good front seats. I drive a 2010 Genesis sedan for everyday and it really works well for a V6. 300 H.P. with instant throttle response, great handling, brakes, etc. Satisfying, but not truly visceral like you get from driving a 1955 Buick Roadmaster!

 

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1 hour ago, Pfeil said:

I'm a car guy, retired from a auto manufacturer ( engineering) after 34 years, before that I was a dealer Tech and also a flight engineer USNR.

Most car guys I know work on their own cars, those that don't or don't know how have big money or they don't get the job done  or loose interest fast.

Since when does 9 quarts of oil and a cartridge oil filter cost $462.--$474.00 ???  

Your best bet is to check it out for yourself seeing nether one of us has a background or experience in pricing.  I just googled the price and I know it is extremely expensive to service a high end car. My sister paid $700 + tax for a battery for her 650 Mercedes from the dealer that she could have bought at NAPA for a fraction of the price. 

  Another way of looking at it is so I drive a high end car and I CAN AFFORD to have the dealer service it for me and not having to do my own work. 

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)
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I really cannot see any newer vehicles that are even a bit exciting.  The only thing I wish I could locate is a 2001 -2005 Chevy Astro with low miles and AWD.  My 2001 is still running good at 195,000 miles and 18 years of ownership.  It has had issues but most I fixed myself.  Been paid for for 13 years.  I don’t really drive all that much anymore(less than 10,000 miles on personal vehicles) so it is hard to justify the cost of even an entry level new car and adding the lack of desire for one I just don’t see me ever getting anything until the Astro desolves to the point of being dangerous.  

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14 hours ago, Ed Luddy said:

I like lots of modern luxury cars as well as muscle cars. Modern muscle fav of mine is the Challenger R/T. Just a base 5.7 Hemi is enough for me.  SRT, Yes but insurance and temptation to stomp on it, get another speeding ticket I can't justify. The Charger R/T is the same, but better ride. Seats suck, so gotta go for the Daytona or SRT to get the good front seats. I drive a 2010 Genesis sedan for everyday and it really works well for a V6. 300 H.P. with instant throttle response, great handling, brakes, etc. Satisfying, but not truly visceral like you get from driving a 1955 Buick Roadmaster!

 

 

Coworker recently bought a Yellow Challenger Super Bee.

Very fast car and tons of fun to drive.

The trans in those cars is the best I have ever experienced for a paddle shifted automatic.

Will it ever be as valuable as the '67 Camaro he also owns?
Probably not.

But there will be plenty of demand for high horsepower limited production, well kept modern muscle cars.

Edited by zepher (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, Ed Luddy said:

I like lots of modern luxury cars as well as muscle cars. Modern muscle fav of mine is the Challenger R/T. Just a base 5.7 Hemi is enough for me.  SRT, Yes but insurance and temptation to stomp on it, get another speeding ticket I can't justify. The Charger R/T is the same, but better ride. Seats suck, so gotta go for the Daytona or SRT to get the good front seats. I drive a 2010 Genesis sedan for everyday and it really works well for a V6. 300 H.P. with instant throttle response, great handling, brakes, etc. Satisfying, but not truly visceral like you get from driving a 1955 Buick Roadmaster!

 

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55buckeyef150 018.jpg

I rented a Charger R/T in Texas. It was faaast! So much fun to drive on the highways where the speed limit is 80. 

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If you're concerned with how much you can sell it for, you're not really interested in the car at all. Owning a car, whether it's old new or anywhere in between, is because you like it and want to create memories in it, driving it, even just looking at it. Saying a car is not going to be around because it's popular is one of the most bizarre things I've read on this forum. A popular car is always going to be popular, declaring it won't be the case for modern cars is simply bias and nothing more.

 

There are lots of modern vehicles I want. Just sticking to what's currently in production, I could list a dozen cars. I'd consider a Mustang #1 but I'm not sure logistically it would work...I sat in one at the dealer and my head was touching the ceiling. More my style is the new Ranger. I am not totally sold on a four door pickup... although I prefer it for cars it just doesn't look right for pickups. I'm quite happy with the Edge we are currently leasing. Any Lincoln would be nice too.

Although I will never own a modern Mopar again, I love the looks of the Challenger and Charger. I know I can fit in the Challenger as well. I love the styling of the Rams but I think they are too big, as are the F-150 and Silverado. 

Moving to GM, I like the Colorado a lot. Buick has a wagon, which caught my eye. I sort of like the modern Cadillacs, but not sure if I would pick them over the rest. As a general rule I like the styling of current GM 3rd out of 3, even though I've traditionally favored GM. 

Moving outside the US, the only ones that interest me are Porsche, Mercedes-Benz, Ferrari and the Volkswagen New Beetle. 

Not a fan of Japanese or Korean cars, with the exception of the NSX, but even the current redesign makes it look a little bit pedestrian. 

 

Of course, when you're poor, getting to experience these cars is pretty much limited to sitting in a few of them at the New York International Auto Show.

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13 hours ago, hidden_hunter said:

 

BMW have the service data in the computer, and you can reset it as an end users - e.g I got my brakes done at the local brake shop and replaced the wear sensor myself then you just hold down a button when you start the car to access the resets for everything.

 

Shhhhhhhhh! You start spreading information like that and the prices will surely go up. BMW stands for "Bring My Wallet" and Jaguar drivers laugh about how many times their car caught on fire. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

Bernie

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There are always bargains out there both in new and used, just depends on what you want. For me I tend to fixate on more of a type of car, gather all of the information possible (most service manuals on DVD are under $20, downloadable are less, did pay $60 for one for my Jeep (and then had to work with the publisher to make SVG files and Javascript work properly). In 2012 I needed a new tow car (gave my '92 TranSport to my sister) after a lot of research settled on a Jeep Grand Cherokee with pentastar engine, towing package, and not much else. Got many discounts and rebates because SUV craze hadn't taken off yet. Was five years before depreciation caught up with it. Prolly keep for a while since warranty does not run out until 2099/999,999 miles. My only 4 door.

 

That said "modern" cars are now going in directions I have no interest in. Someday the insurance companies will probably require access to trip recorders (same already are). While I like ABS and AC and first computer car (which I reprogrammed) was an '84, do not care for the full nanny cars popular now.

 

Spending waaay to much time (tore biceps muscle so cant lift much) on trying to figure out the computer (Linux variant) in my TV.

 

ps had a BMW (wife wanted one) a '70 2000A. Lost count of the number of times I had to fix a "curbed" (stuck down below bumper) AC compressor.

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I rarely get involved with these topics, but now sitting here waiting for couple of overseas phone calls, why not.

 

Admire ? Aspire to acquire ? 

I am & have always been a analog/all-things-mechanical/vintage car guy through and through, so there's not much, if anything made in past 40+ years I find interesting enough to desire having/owning.

 

I do have a late model ('16) pick-up truck as a daily driver, but like just about all other "modern" vehicles, find driving/using it about as exciting/interesting as an empty cardboard box.

 

Even if I were given a latest & greatest luxury, hypercar or something equally exotic, regardless of brand, rarity or perceived value, I'd likely just sell it immediately, probably even without driving it once and use the funds on something I do find interesting or practical, like a vintage car or real estate and depending on windfall, perhaps even ship one of my vintage cars to some other continent for (vintage) driving vacation to explore scenic back roads and local culture, including that associated with vintage cars, for at least couple of months. 

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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The last modern car that I really admired and aspired to own was my 2000 Subaru Impreza Outback Sport. A small, peppy 5-speed wagon that could go anywhere. They don't make fun cars like that anymore, newer Subarus are much bigger and have too many electronic bells and whistles, plus I don't really like their current styling. Nobody makes small all-wheel-drive wagons, now it's a choice between an econobox hatchback or a Jeep. I looked forever for a nice Outback Sport. Loved that car. But after a couple of years I stupidly sold it, because I was living in NYC and got tired of shifting in traffic jams every day - so I got a Forester with automatic instead. Big mistake, as I soon found out about the infamous head gaskets, and then I moved away from NY, to where I could've been enjoying driving a 5-speed...  So maybe some day I'll look for another one of these.

 

Other than that, no. I like some modern cars more than others, but none inspire admiration or aspiration. I have no use for sports cars and exotica, and current models don't really have my kind of personality. 

 

 

1999-subaru-impreza-frontside_suimpout993.jpg

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I like my 2015 Tundra. My son tried to talk me into trading it in and even brought me to a Toyota dealership one time. I just don’t like most modern cars, so this short old lady has stuck with the 2015 Tundra that I have to jump up into because I don’t have running boards. 

 

I guess I’d take a Challenger R/T if I could afford one, but only if I could keep the PU too. I also have a fondness for Mercedes SLK’s from the late 90’s on. (Retractable Hard Top). The truth is I’d probably buy much older cars if I had the money. 

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48 minutes ago, Big Beat said:

I have no use for sports cars and exotica, and current models don't really have my kind of personality. 

 

I feel much the same way.  If you want a 2-door car 

or a convertible today, it has to be a sports car

or a subcompact.  And those, practically, seat only two

people.

 

Manufacturers have forgotten about full-size and

mid-size coupes and convertibles.  The last full-sized

2-door cars in the U. S. were the 1987 Ford Crown Victoria

and Mercury Marquis, and they could seat six.  How about

a 2-door big Buick, Cadillac, Lincoln, or Lexus?

 

 

1977 Lincoln Mark V--navy and white 2.jpg

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Merc SLK R170s are quite undervalued (good ones well under $10k) at the moment and do not have the engine issues of the later ones. I'd prefer a '01-'03 (facelift) SLK320. Same drivetrain used for may years in sedans.

My SLK320 (automatic) is easy to work on and my project car is a SLK230 (5 speed) I paid less than a large for (but needs hydromechanical assembly).

Suspect prices are down because people are scared of them. Is a wealth of information and a strong forum online. First SLK230s will be AACA eligible next year.

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