Pfeil

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About Pfeil

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  1. Pfeil

    What

    I am too. I got this for saying much less in may. And I might add that you can't talk about the future of our hobby, the future of the type of gasoline we use and will use in the future, air pollution, Legislation that effects car owners, the economy and how it effects our hobby. All these things are controlled by the politicians. Talk about policy and which politicians effect us and you get what I got. Tread lightly on this site folks. Penalty Given 10 points which will never expire. Content moderated - 29 days and 23 hours Note for member you broke the forum rules with your political comments. Do it again and you'll be banned.
  2. Bill, the only young kids that I know in my area that are into cars are the "TUNER CARS" These kids are the new hot hotrodders of today. Like the hot rods of yester year that are still being made they all have a common thread. All of them are modified cars, and modified cars don't go well with the terms Restoration, Preservation which are hallmarks of clubs like AACA.
  3. Did you read this? Some of us have tried! In 1969 a small group of local Prescott residents who were passionate about antique and classic cars decided to start their own car club. After several meetings to hash out the details, the Prescott Antique Auto Club was chartered in 1970. Today, approaching 50 years of continuous operation, the club is going strong with over 240 memberships, more than 400 members and over 600 cars in their garages. I would say that the club members cars are about 1/4 to 1/3rd the number of cars in our area. And for those of you who would probably ask. YES! I made them aware of AACA to see if they wanted to become a AACA chapter and the answer was a resounding NO.
  4. CALIFORNIA Antelope Valley Region President - John Knapp 4737 W. Avenue M-8 Quartz Hill, CA 93536-2944 Cabrillo Region President - Luke Rizzuto 16205 Redwood Lodge Rd Los Gatos, CA 95033 California Region President - Paul Bittner 55 Paso Nogal Ct Pleasant Hill, CA 94523-1700 Fallbrook Vintage Car Club Region President - Douglas Allen PO Box 714 Fallbrook, CA 92088 Inland Empire/Palm Springs Region President - Bill Adams 9800 Oak Glen Rd. Cherry Valley, CA 92223-3746 Kern County Region President - John Bakich 10806 Enger St Bakersfield, CA 93312-3268 Modesto Central Valley Region President - Robert Raduechel 5701 Garst Rd Modesto, CA 95357 Mother Lode Region President - Rich Rinaldi 18560 Lambert Lake Rd Sonora, CA 95370 Mount Konocti Region President - Bob Cramer PO Box 805 Kelseyville, CA 95451 Orange County Region President - Ray Chips 55 Waterman Irvine, CA 92602 Palm Springs Region President - Frank Wenzel 1475 Lobo Way Palm Springs, CA 92264 Rancho Tehama Yolla Bolly Region President - James Lovell PO Box 5817 Corning, CA 96021 Redwood Empire Region President - Linda Bare 1855 Archer Way Sebastopol, CA 95472 Salinas Valley Region President - Donald Cranford PO Box 7503 Spreckels, CA 93962-7503 San Diego Region President - Tom McILravy 7321 Le Conte St San Diego, CA 99114 San Luis Obispo Region President - Phil Gammons 1344 Avalon St San Luis Obispo CA 93405 Santa Barbara Region President - Dana Newquist 605 Juan Crespi Ln Santa Barbara, CA 93108 Santa Clarita Valley Region President - Robert Caldwell 25451 Via Macarena Valencia, CA 91355 Southern California Region President - Robert Pritchard 532 Rossmore Ave Apt 203 Los Angeles, CA 90004 Southwestern Two-Wheelers Region President - Harry McGill 1261 Emory St Imperial Beach, CA 91932-3325 Valle Del Sur Region President - Russ Carr 13400 Center Ave. San Martin, CA 95046-9765 Valley Of The Flowers Region President - Rodney McCarthy 505 S B St Lompoc, CA 93436 California is a big state. The chapter that I was closest to had a once a year meeting to pick officers, and then had a once a month cruise to a restaurant and sometimes a point of interest like going wine tasting somewhere in the region. Never put on a local car show, never hosted a AACA event while I was a member. I got the impression 90% never worked on a car, the discussions at the monthly cruise weren't about cars for the most part and many people brought a modified car to a restaurant point of interest cruise, which confused people that were casual observers that just happened by and saw modified cars all the while members reiterated the AACA is for bone stock cars. Where I'm at now ( Prescott national forest area) the closest region is down in the "HOT" Phoenix area but the only chapter that host events and seems active at all is even further away in Tucson. And did I say that my area is a hotbed of old cars. We do have a Prescott Antique automobile club; In 1969 a small group of local Prescott residents who were passionate about antique and classic cars decided to start their own car club. After several meetings to hash out the details, the Prescott Antique Auto Club was chartered in 1970. Today, approaching 50 years of continuous operation, the club is going strong with over 240 memberships, more than 400 members and over 600 cars in their garages. I would say that the club members cars are about 1/4 to 1/3rd the number of cars in our area. And for those of you who would probably ask. YES! I made them aware of AACA to see if they wanted to become a AACA chapter and the answer was a resounding NO.
  5. That's the way it is here in the central highlands of Arizona, and also the way it was on the California Central Coast.
  6. I'm one of those model railroaders too and there are two guys in my neighborhood who are also model railroaders, and they have antique cars. If you look above to my reply to Bernie you'll get a picture of the kind of small city/ town I live in.
  7. Well Bernie, you sure paint a different picture of the car culture that I'm surrounded with. At almost 69 years old most of my car friends are in their 50's 60's, 70's 80's some in their 90's. The guys I know are into all cars foreign and domestic NEW and OLD, and in general into all years. My little city is a hot bed of all kinds of cars and a huge retirement car enthusiast population where most people work on their own cars. At least half or more of the guys I know including myself have large shops and at least one lift with multiple cars. Most of our backgrounds revolve around automotive, aviation, engineering, machinist, electricians, heck, a good friend that's into corvette's was a ship surveyor of mainly U.S. warships. What I'm saying is most are of a technical background and just like in the Surfing world it was always the "interest" and not age that brought us together.
  8. I thought it was a question, not a statement.
  9. They wouldn't let us use the slide rule during test. We had to use the calculator in our head. This showed them the brain was functional.
  10. Greg, the point I was trying to make about the shop classes is when I went to school EVERY boy had to take those classes, not just the guys that would eventually be working in the trades. Also all the girls had to take home economic classes and as with the guys it didn't matter if they were college prep or not.
  11. You are missing the point. Without a calculator and not knowing how to use that calculator in your head anymore you are useless. It's like trying to build a house without a foundation.
  12. Two cars in my car collection I have owned since I was 17, one I bought used and the other I special ordered new. I got my love of cars from my Dad and my brother-in-law, then later in school. I was schooled in the Los Angeles Unified school district in the middle of the last century. In those days EVERY school boy, whether or not he was going to college or not had to have at least one semester of drafting, print shop, wood shop, metal shop, electric shop by the end of the 9th grade. The 3 year H/S was Wood shop, Electric shop, Auto shop, Machine shop, Welding shop, and again drafting. If you were going to college among the afore mentioned you would have had your algebra by the 8th grade and your first year of a foreign language and geometry done by the end of the 9th grade. We also had the usual english, history, geography, music appreciation, art appreciation and P.E. for a total of seven periods a day. School in those day taught you how to use your head and your hands. Later on in life even if you didn't have a job in one of those fields you sure had a understanding and appreciation of what other people did for a living. What we got was a good foundation, but I'm afraid the kids growing up today do not have a basic background. My daughter-n law teaches H/S calculus and she can tell you if you take the calculator away the kids are lost. This leads us to the cars of the mid 70's to present day. Kids will have no problem dealing with OBD1, 2 and when it comes OBD3. The question arises will they know how to use the machines in the machine shop, or how to check the machinist work when the engine block come back after being sent out? Todays car's aren't as complicated as you may think and the advantage is they can talk to you. For example today, my 2019 truck developed a ABS brake pulsation. Instead of having to check all the wheel sensors my scanner had already pin pointed that the rt rear sensor was at fault and upon inspection it revealed some road debris had been kicked up and damaged it. As said before in other threads that the problem of the long term future will have more to do with desire and ability of future car lovers, parts being stored or more importantly reproduced, the price and availability of fuel, even attitudes of popular opinion of society looking down at people for owning such environmentally incorrect vehicles. Just a note about the photo above; For over 60+ years owners manuals have said to never wash a vehicle in the sun.
  13. Why try to convince anyone let alone young people to like anything. It sounds like someone is trying to sell something. Setting a example of restored cars and encouragement of the curious that look into the car hobby is the way to go. AACA makes it clear about how old a car has to be to compete. I've never heard someone in any sort of capacity discourage owners cars which have just turned 25 years old. The real threat is people and leaders that will forever threaten our hobby by way of persuading popular opinion of old cars in a negative way. Teaching the young that automobiles, planes, trains, ships are causing grave harm and should be done away with. This is where the problem of us being able to continue the way we want to in our love for the automobile and in reality our way of life is most paramount. Go to car shows and listen to the young people talk about our cars. Listen to your grandchildren, ask them what they learn in schools about our cars, the energy sector of our economy, industry in general. See how minds are molded. Hear the difference between a society which used to say "can do" as opposed to the "can't do" society.
  14. There is a lot more to consider besides snow to a car person. Just ask a former California native who left because paradise was mismanaged and lost.
  15. 34' X 48' and two four post lifts plus a 3 car attached. I struggled for years and years. Not anymore. If I didn't have this I wouldn't be in the hobby as my body wouldn't take it- I think it has something to do with gravity;