60FlatTop

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60FlatTop last won the day on October 16 2018

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About 60FlatTop

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    Bernie Daily
  • Birthday 09/26/1948

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  1. The real problem with cars prices is that so many want to know, but no one will ever tell what they paid or got. It is comical to watch old car guys dance around the question of how much they paid, sold, or invested in their cars. You can always get an account of what some one else did though. "I'm looking at a car similar to that one you just bought. What does a car like that go for?" "Ummm, oh, er, a, well, he had and asking price and after a discussion we came to an agreement." "Thanks. I was looking for a number." "Well, those aren't cheap. you know." "Cheap is not the prerequisite. I just want a number." Think I'm kidding? Go ahead, ask the man who owns one. Bernie
  2. If you ever get a chance to visit New York State you will soon see the farm equipment is all left sitting outside in the weather. Nothing in the barn except those random cars and a few hay bales. Easy to lose it when you don't use it. One thing you rarely find in an old barn, an old tractor, they are out in the hedgerow. Next topic: Police auctions. Bernie
  3. The mirror on an Appleton makes backing into your garage a lot easier than those little peep mirrors. My '48 Packard had a factory option one.
  4. Find someone with a '62 Ford Galaxy or a Thunderbird and squeeze a test drive out of them. THEN drive your Riviera. You won't believe how good it will feel. One problem I have seen is the younger owner in the "school bus driver" position, seat forward, back straight and high, with both handles on the wheel. They spend all kinds of time over correcting. These cars are for driving with the seat rearward, semi-recliner position, with one hand on the wheel, and an elbow on the armrest. That makes them work to ride. Lean back, let the wheels track where the roads takes it, within limits, this is your private living room. I read all the modification posts and imagine tires squealing from every stop and an arm sticking out the window waving a big cowboy hat. My cars are sp quiet you can hear me holler "Yahoo!" when I get into them. On biased tires. No hat.
  5. Sometimes a little bit of red leaf will help your fingers tingle from knowing how the sting feels. Or you can taste stuff.
  6. It ain't broken. If you want a new car just go out and buy one. If you have one car that has an original design you wish to have improved it is far better to another car designed with the improvements you seek. AND DON'T TELL MY WIFE ANYTHING DIFFERENT!
  7. A couple of years ago I was considering this Lincoln convertible that had been customized, Step one was to uncustomize it. I'm sure "it seemed like a good idea at the time". Be careful, I don't think a Buick would take kindly to it either. Oh, tes, I regret not buying it when I had the chance. And it would be stock now. It wasn't irreversible. Bernie
  8. It will feel that way compared to a modern, mid-'80's and up. The small diameter steering wheel rim adds to the different feel as well as no automatic overdrive. Part of the experience. Bernie
  9. "You should go look in some junkyards. It would be too expensive to send me." said the appraiser.
  10. Every car leaves the factory in homogeneous forms in different colors. Nature has such a neat random way of taking them back, no two alike.
  11. The biggest precaution I take financially is carrying my money in the front pocket of my pants. My Dad and I went to the Atlantic City car auction and swap meet in 1974 and we were standing at the entrance in a long line. He asked "Where's your money?" I patted my wallet. He told me I wouldn't notice someone slipping my wallet out of my back pocket, but he was pretty sure I'd know if a hand went in my front pocket. At was a short but pivotal discussion of great influence. Some years later I was traveling on the west coast, partly to visit the Pomona swap meet, with a significant amount of money in my pocket. I was driving by bars in the Ontario area at night, thinking of stopping, but not wanting to walk into a strange place with the cash. That was another realization. Since them I carry enough money to be cautious about where I go. The main thing, when distance purchasing or traveling to make a purchase is to stay aware of what you are doing and what is going on around you. And never think you know it all. And watch out for those old scoundrels. "Elmer, I almost lost it when you told that city slicker you were selling our Buick for money to fix up the porch."
  12. The cooling system and the lubrication system are far more reliable than the gauges. When you do the routine maintenance the lights won't come on. The array of gauges in the 1950's cars, along with rocket trim and stylized airplanes were just added so guys could imagine they were WWII fighter pilots. Do a test, stop at your auto parts counter and ask the man for an oil pressure gauge. He will ask you which one, from a display on the wall. Then ask him for an oil pump that fits your car. "Well, I That should take about three days to get in." Same goes for temperature gauges, but 20 year old hoses are easier to replace than an oil pump. Rolls-Royce cars come with gauges and lights in the modern versions. If you are driving on the expressway and the light comes on it will cost about $5,000 if you immediately pull to the shoulder and stop. If you wait and get off at the next exit you might get lucky and only cost $25,000. Every Saturday my Dad used to check the fluids and lights on his car. When I think about that a light goes on. Bernie
  13. Join your local club and the national marque club. Those will be the best resources you can find. The best approach, for those following, is to join the clubs before you buy the car and use all the resources of the club to buy the best possible car you can get. If you are looking for cooperative working and storage space, with access to tools and equipment, with expert help in the next bay or close at hand, that is a little more communal than I have seen in the hobby. For years I have been saying there are a minimum of three hundred $100 jobs on a major project. Maybe I will list them and make a guide book for my swan song. Many cars have much more support than others. What do you have? Bernie