sewittwer

Thinking of buying 1929 Mercedes AMG GLA Corriendo - and need information

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Hi there. My husband and I are thinking about buying a vehicle listed as an 1929 Mercedes AMG GLA Corriendo. Everything is as I would expect however the one selling it has expired temp tags on it and he says there is no VIN number on it and no title. He sent a picture of the data plate  with the Assigned Identification Number from Virginia. How would I go about tracing this vehicle to make sure I can legally buy it and get it registered in Texas with a title? Thank you

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

This is an assembled car made from a kit.  See what your DMV has to say about them as well as your insurance company.

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First thing I would do is contact the Texas motor vehicle department. I know in MD there is no way I could get tags without a vehicle title. I have heard of 'bonded titles' and such, but never had the need and have no idea how they work. Again, in my state the dmv is seriously backed up with the '19' going on, so this may take some time. Also, I would get any info in writing, I would not trust someones word in this matter.

I am assuming this is a kit car thus the reason for not having a vin. 

Good Luck.

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nightmare, run away fast.  Kit car, little difference than a dune buggy, rides stiff, and no resale value if you try to sell it later after realizing it was a bad move.....and no title which is really bad in TX, as well as no current registration which helps in some states.

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2 minutes ago, F&J said:

nightmare, run away fast.  Kit car, little difference than a dune buggy, rides stiff, and no resale value if you try to sell it later after realizing it was a bad move.....and no title which is really bad in TX, as well as no current registration which helps in some states.

Yep. RUN AWAY from it.

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Agree, but to each his own. Depending on you budget 50's era MG's can be had for reasonable sums, similar appearance and I am sure respectful resale.

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Agree with all the previous comments.  No title, no sale.   Also,  I try very hard to remember that everybody is in to different kinds of cars,   many I would not like.   But that thing is a piece of crap.

 

And Frank,  there are many Dune Buggy's that I think are pretty cool.

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That plate IS the VIN. SO, not usually a problem, but of course, I am in Virginia, so it wouldn't be.

 

Having no title IS THE problem, and would be in Virginia also!

 

 You should email the Virginia DMV, dmvnow.com for information,  and see if they will divulge any information on that VIN . Due to privacy concerns, might not be too helpful, but might at least say the VIN is good.

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With that extended tail expect VW power and not Pinto.

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NO TITLE = RUN. It has an assigned VIN that means it has a title. If the seller doesn't have the title assume the car is stolen. Move on to another car. you cannot afford the headache this car will become. 

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1 hour ago, sewittwer said:

Hi there. My husband and I are thinking about buying a vehicle listed as an 1929 Mercedes AMG GLA Corriendo.... 

 

1 hour ago, F&J said:

... no resale value if you try to sell it later after realizing it was a bad move...

 

Ma'am, we offer our helpful thoughts because it sounds

as if you may be new to the old-car hobby.  A true Mercedes

from 1929 would be a very expensive car, whereas this is

an imitation of some sort, and not even a close imitation.

I hope you are not paying very much for it.

 

I don't know anything about these kit cars, but others here 

likely do.  Maybe they are fun.  But you might be much better

served if you buy a TRUE older car--perhaps, since you're

just getting your feet wet, from the 1950's and up.  There are

plenty of worthy old cars, even some fairly small and sporty,

that you might like.  Older British cars are known for being more

problematic;  old American cars have better support in the hobby.

 

The hobby is wide, and if you don't choose this "1929" model,

you'll have fun considering the range of choices.  We'll be happy

to offer help.  

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Its the automotive equivalent of a cubic zirconium, fake.  Run away, run away quickly.     

Spend your money on a real car, even if it isn't as showy, you'll have more true value with it.

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1 hour ago, alsancle said:

And Frank,  there are many Dune Buggy's that I think are pretty cool.

I wasn't dissing buggies, I was trying to inform the OP & husband that it's not really what they'd expect as far as the "feel" of driving a "car", meaning mostly ride quality.

 

BTW, I was still a teen back in March1970 when the VW/Porshe dealer I worked for, sent me to VW "factory" training in Orangeburg NY.  So I know a bit about A/C VWs.  The dealer did take a dune buggy in trade with an early Porsche engine, it had what the Porsche mechanics said was a "90" perhaps they said S90, I forget.

 

I did resell a VW sandrail a couple years back and have owned/dailydriven, or resold 100+ bugs, incl 4 early split-windows, early cabriolets, etc

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Posted (edited)

If you're in Texas, I highly recommend Lawrence Auto title. I've dealt with he company twice and received great service.

 

Listen to his advice. If he says to walk away, walk away. At best, you'll have to put up a bond.

 

Do what they recommend.

 

https://www.lawrenceautotitle.com

 

Personally, the car scares me.  You should find a similar version with no title problems

 

 

Edited by RansomEli (see edit history)

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"Kit" car means no standards, no quality assurance, no consistency, etc etc etc. IF (my famous BIG IF) it was built by someone that really knew what they were doing and built it right? They can be great fun! IF built by the average home know-nothing hobbyist? You could be rolling the dice for your life every time you drive it, IF you ever get it going well enough to drive it. Unless you really KNOW what you are looking at? Best to find a better way into the hobby.

 

Be also aware, most of those kit cars are not real collector cars. They have limited followings, mostly by people with no real knowledge of real collector cars. Although they have been building those kits since the 1960s, and technically they do qualify as "antiques" (maybe, varies from state to state). They may not be very welcome in a lot of places.

Another thought. Because the licensing was not completed? In many states it may need to be licensed as a new car, NOW. That means it may have to have all the new car state smog requirements and safety standards. Which likely may be impossible.

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44 minutes ago, wayne sheldon said:

"Kit" car means no standards, no quality assurance, no consistency, etc etc etc. IF (my famous BIG IF) it was built by someone that really knew what they were doing and built it right? They can be great fun! IF built by the average home know-nothing hobbyist? You could be rolling the dice for your life every time you drive it, IF you ever get it going well enough to drive it. Unless you really KNOW what you are looking at? Best to find a better way into the hobby.

 

Be also aware, most of those kit cars are not real collector cars. They have limited followings, mostly by people with no real knowledge of real collector cars. Although they have been building those kits since the 1960s, and technically they do qualify as "antiques" (maybe, varies from state to state). They may not be very welcome in a lot of places.

Another thought. Because the licensing was not completed? In many states it may need to be licensed as a new car, NOW. That means it may have to have all the new car state smog requirements and safety standards. Which likely may be impossible.

 

I bolded the really important point (besides it can never be legally registered).

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While it's true older British sports cars are more problematic on average than an American car of the same era, if the open front fender, 1920-1930 era style appeals to you, an MGTD isn't a bad choice.  There is good support for these in terms of parts and advice.  But (and it's a big one) if you have never done your own repairs, troubleshooting or basic maintenance,  you may be better off with something needing less attention.  With respect to the car you asked about, everyone here is giving you good advice to let this one pass unless it's almost free.  

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I want to put in a dissenting opinion here. Yes I know this is a kit car or replica, in short, a plastic toy not a real antique car. But you can have a lot of fun with a car like that for not much money if you buy it right. I might give it a whirl for laughs on certain conditions - either sort out the title issue or buy it cheap enough that I can handle it myself, and inspect the car or have a mechanic go over it and see if it was put together right in the first place. Keeping in mind that it is not going to be as reliable as a new car but the steering, brakes, and lights should be right. The problem is a lot of people think they are worth a lot of money and to a real old car guy, they are not.

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Don't, I repeat Don't get in an accident with it. Even a minor one as there will probably be little if any parts support for it. 

These folks have given you excellent advice and none of us want to see you disappointed with your purchase. 

 

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8 hours ago, sewittwer said:

Hi there. My husband and I are thinking about buying a vehicle listed as an 1929 Mercedes AMG GLA Corriendo. Everything is as I would expect however the one selling it has expired temp tags on it and he says there is no VIN number on it and no title. He sent a picture of the data plate  with the Assigned Identification Number from Virginia. How would I go about tracing this vehicle to make sure I can legally buy it and get it registered in Texas with a title? Thank you

received_1095128054215135.jpeg

 

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Thank you all for your great advice. We have decided to pass on buying this car. We are now looking into buying the car I was originally wanting...an MG. My Dad had one when I was a kid and I never forgot it. He had to get rid of it when we kids couldn't fit in it any more. I found one identical to that one and I want to surprise my Dad with it for his 65th birthday. Thank you again. You were extremely helpful and I look forward to learning more from you all in the future.

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Sewitter, I hope this post does not run you away from the hobby. Everyone that replied had some great advise. These (kit) cars are everywhere here in North Carolina and they are built with either Volkswagon platforms or Ford Pinto platforms. Some of these cars look great but, as others have said, you will not likely get your money back if and when you decided to sell. I personally am glad you decided to go with the MG.. They look similar but in the long run you will be much happier with the MG. Continue to ask these old guys and gals for their help and you won't go wrong. Good luck with you hunt.

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52 minutes ago, Morgansdad said:

Sewitter, I hope this post does not run you away from the hobby. Everyone that replied had some great advise. These (kit) cars are everywhere here in North Carolina and they are built with either Volkswagon platforms or Ford Pinto platforms. Some of these cars look great but, as others have said, you will not likely get your money back if and when you decided to sell. I personally am glad you decided to go with the MG.. They look similar but in the long run you will be much happier with the MG. Continue to ask these old guys and gals for their help and you won't go wrong. Good luck with you hunt.

It definitely did not scare me away. It was very informative and enlightening. I'm glad there is a wonderful forum like this. I'm sure I will be back to pick your brains more when we get the new ride. 😁

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Sewitter,Just curious,what year and type of MG? I bought a 74 mgb about five years ago,a chrome bumper one and it's been a fun car.Also good support groups for them.

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Sewitter, if that character you sleep with is over 6 foot tall and 245 lbs (I assume you would be smaller) I strongly suggest he tries to get in and out of an MGTC or TD, before you buy one. Especially if he has bad knees.  Unless of course it is going to be just your classy little sports car. If so, go for it and have a ball and be sure to smile and wave to him occasionally! . 👍

dave s 

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