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What's a " big slip daddy"?


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Didn't we have this conversation a few months ago?

 

Also, it's "I've got the pink slip, daddy" meaning, "I've got the ownership paperwork, daddy-o," [so let's race and the winner gets the loser's car because that's how confident I am in the Deuce Coupe].

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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I dislike the term "pink slip" in this context because in my state the only actual pink slip the DMV gives you is a registration, which can't transfer ownership. The term isn't universal, so to me it's confusing. The only term I dislike more in ads is "paperwork." What does that mean??

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The ever fascinating subject of linguistics! How language does in fact change over short term in itself is interesting. Growing up in the 1950s and '60s, the youth culture was somewhat unique. At no other time in human history was a young man of 20 years still considered to be a child! For thousands of years, young men were working as adults by the time they were thirteen! Young women were married off to keep house and support themselves how they could at that same age. Sometimes even younger for either of them.

The 1950s were an anomaly or over-reaction to the very hard times of the 1930s depression years followed by half a decade of world war. Young parents wanted their children to have the childhood they had been denied.

One of the side affects of that was the counter-culture and automotive cultures that grew larger in the '50s and '60s. Growing up in those times, we heard the phrase and or boast often about "having the pink slip!" In many states (not all!) it was a big deal for a young man (or even young lady?) to not be driving "daddy's" car. Hence, "I got the pink slip"! And it was often used as a challenge to race "for pinks"!

Sometimes it is hard to understand that that phrase was only commonly used like that for about two decades.

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3 hours ago, JamesR said:

I dislike the term "pink slip" in this context because in my state the only actual pink slip the DMV gives you is a registration, which can't transfer ownership. The term isn't universal, so to me it's confusing. The only term I dislike more in ads is "paperwork." What does that mean??

The terminology was specific to California and the era. Why California? Well pretty much all of the Beach Boy songs were based about things in Southern California and this was no exception.

 

For what it is worth, my old car was brought into California before they started issuing titles and the “paperwork” for that car consists of a single pink slip of paper. It has vehicle and owner information on the front and places to sign the car over to a new owner on the back. I guess I could scan it, blank out 90% of it for privacy reasons, and post it to show what it looks like. But I am a bit too lazy to do that at present. Also, for what it is worth, the yearly registration forms look pretty much the same now as they did decades ago and were/are on white paper stock, not pink.

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1 hour ago, TAKerry said:

Was watching a 1950's movie on TCM the other night (no idea what it was) and there was a scene involved selling a car. The car said something to the effect "I assume you have the pink slip".

I always figured it referred to the title of the car.

That line about having the pink slip was no doubt used in several movies and is well known as a California thing; the movie scene you mention reminds me of the movie "Psycho" when Janet Leigh was selling her car (57 Ford?) at a used car lot and purchasing another so she could keep running with the $40k she stole, the salesman said that line to her; I'm pretty sure she was running from Phoenix, and heading for the Bates Motel.

 

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4 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

The ever fascinating subject of linguistics! How language does in fact change over short term in itself is interesting. Growing up in the 1950s and '60s, the youth culture was somewhat unique. At no other time in human history was a young man of 20 years still considered to be a child! For thousands of years, young men were working as adults by the time they were thirteen! Young women were married off to keep house and support themselves how they could at that same age. Sometimes even younger for either of them.

The 1950s were an anomaly or over-reaction to the very hard times of the 1930s depression years followed by half a decade of world war. Young parents wanted their children to have the childhood they had been denied.

The above song summed it up.

 

Craig

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25 minutes ago, Rivguy said:

There are so many words that were sung in pop songs that were misunderstood.

 

Don't even get me started on Dead Man's Curve. I could look up the lyrics of all those confusing songs online, but after all of these years the mystery created by low fidelity and poor diction is kind of magical. I don't think I want to know the correct words. 😄 Creedence Clearwater Revival was probably the worst.

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Poor diction is a huge problem. And singers of all types are terrible about it. When I watch You Tube videos of opera singers, I like to find ones captioned in the sung language because even they aren't clear enough in their enunciations. 

One of my 'fond' memories of my trying to learn at an early age was teachers leading the classroom near the end of the school year, all of us singing "School days, school days, dear old golden rule days - - - -"

I even asked my teachers to clarify the words so I could get it right, and they couldn't do it. It took me a couple years before I was able to find the proper words, because the whole class, including the teachers (who I wonder if they even knew the right words themselves?), made it come out "Taco the tuna, a hickory stick! ("taught to the tune of a hickory stick", the slapping of the hickory stick on ones knuckles for not paying sufficient attention in class). When I ASKED my teachers about it? They couldn't give me the right answer. I finally found it in a book in the library along about the third grade.

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13 hours ago, Glen Andrews said:

That line about having the pink slip was no doubt used in several movies and is well known as a California thing; the movie scene you mention reminds me of the movie "Psycho" when Janet Leigh was selling her car (57 Ford?) at a used car lot and purchasing another so she could keep running with the $40k she stole, the salesman said that line to her; I'm pretty sure she was running from Phoenix, and heading for the Bates Motel.

 

One of my favorite movies. I love the scene with the used car salesman "first time the customer pressured the salesman". The one I was referring to was not from Psycho though.

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11 hours ago, JamesR said:

 

Don't even get me started on Dead Man's Curve. I could look up the lyrics of all those confusing songs online, but after all of these years the mystery created by low fidelity and poor diction is kind of magical. I don't think I want to know the correct words. 😄 Creedence Clearwater Revival was probably the worst.

I think 'Louis Louis' by the Kingsmen holds the record for undiscernible lyrics.

 

Craig

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Don't be hard on the OP.  Wife mocks me to this day for thinking line in Queen's Champions song is "big disk brakes" vs. "Big disgrace". 

 

Of course, if you are old enough to recall, disc brakes were a big deal on newer cars when that song was released.  I just thought it was an attitude reference at the time. 

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When I got speeding tickets the cop always gave me the pink copy. "I" had the pink slips, Daddy.

 

Things have changed. I went to court a few years ago with the yellow copy. In a room full of 45 violators, I could have swapped tickets with any of them. All plead guilty to a signal light failure. $100 for the light and a mandatory state tax of $100. On my turn the judge passed me on to the cashier and I had my $200 ready. The cashier said "Oh, you've been here before?" I said "No, I'm the 20th".

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The gist of this thread really is about how sometimes it's nearly impossible to understand the lyrics of a song as sung by the performer.   Perfect example is Brown Sugar by the Rolling Stones.  I've heard that song a thousand times and when I try to sing along I always end up inserting a lot of "hum a hummas" where Mick Jagger slurs the lyrics, which is in most places.  When I heard that the Stones were going to stop performing that song, I thought oh boy, here we go again.  But then I heard someone slowly and clearly read the lyrics and man, even I think that it crosses a line.

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2 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

When I got speeding tickets the cop always gave me the pink copy. "I" had the pink slips, Daddy.

 

Things have changed. I went to court a few years ago with the yellow copy. In a room full of 45 violators, I could have swapped tickets with any of them. All plead guilty to a signal light failure. $100 for the light and a mandatory state tax of $100. On my turn the judge passed me on to the cashier and I had my $200 ready. The cashier said "Oh, you've been here before?" I said "No, I'm the 20th".

Revenue wheels go 'round and 'round...

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What does Big Slip Daddy mean?
“A 'big slip daddy' is street rod talk for the optional and prized Chevy/Corvette/Mopar limited slip differential rear end on the rear axle. A high performance option that meant a fast street rod capable of an even-tire burnout.”

 

 

Screenshot (1287).png

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The limited-slip differential, with brand names such as Positraction, Sure Grip, Anti-Spin or Safe-T-Track, was an essential weapon in the muscle-car wars of the 1960s. This is documented in the often misheard lyric in the Beach Boys classic, “Little Deuce Coupe.”

 

The actual lyric is, “There’s one more thing, I’ve got the big slip, daddy.” “Big slip” was ’60s hot-rod slang for a limited-slip differential.

 

The San Diego Union Tribune

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The lyrics to the song “little deuce coup”

 

Bridge]
She's got a competition clutch with the four on the floor
And she purrs like a kitten 'till the lake pipes roar
And if that ain't enough to make you flip your lid
There's one more thing, I got the pink slip, daddy

[Verse 3]
And coming off the line when the light turns green (deuce coupe)
Well, she blows them out of the water like you never seen (deuce coupe)
I get pushed out of shape and it's hard to steer (deuce coupe)

 

 

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