Buick35

Old wives tales for cars

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If anyone has some to share I think it would be interesting.I've heard about putting mothballs in the air cleaner does that do any good? I've also heard about the saw dust in the rear end but I think that was a dealer trick.Thanks,Greg.

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Sand in the tires is a true story, during the First World War there was also a rubber shortage just like the second war and loading tires was cheaper than a replacement 

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Interesting,I wonder how they put the sand in.Greg

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Maybe the same way as tractor tires are loaded now? Or maybe just laying on the Side before putting the second side over the rim. 

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Lacquer thinner stops leaks in automatic transmissions.  1/2 cup usually does it.

Asprins in battery cells makes car batteries feel better and hold a charge.

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Your plastic-cased battery will discharge if set on a concrete floor...

 

But apparently it won't discharge on the conductive METAL battery tray that it sits on in the car. 🙄

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Irish Spring soap in your car's interior is supposed to repel mice. My tough country mice ate the soap. I have visions of them hiccuping little green bubbles back in their nest.

 

Ground up horse pucks are apparently good at sealing up a leaky radiator. The pucks aren't as plentiful as they once were for some reason.

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Oatmeal and pepper were two popular radiator sealers.  My father used oatmeal on his '38 Pontiac and it worked.

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14 minutes ago, joe_padavano said:

Your plastic-cased battery will discharge if set on a concrete floor...

 

But apparently it won't discharge on the conductive METAL battery tray that it sits on in the car. 🙄

 Haha, i still put my batteries on a wood on top of concrete! 

what is the opinion on covering tires on trailers with garbage bags or other covers to prolong the life

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7 minutes ago, J.H.Boland said:

Irish Spring soap in your car's interior is supposed to repel mice. My tough country mice ate the soap. I have visions of them hiccuping little green bubbles back in their nest.

 

Ground up horse pucks are apparently good at sealing up a leaky radiator. The pucks aren't as plentiful as they once were for some reason.

Get the puck outta here!

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20 minutes ago, joe_padavano said:

Your plastic-cased battery will discharge if set on a concrete floor...

 

But apparently it won't discharge on the conductive METAL battery tray that it sits on in the car. 🙄

Did you hear about the guy who was arrested on battery? They locked him away in a dry cell.

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4 minutes ago, Harold said:

Oatmeal and pepper were two popular radiator sealers.  My father used oatmeal on his '38 Pontiac and it worked.

The bugs in  the swampy drainage ditch water along side the NY State thruway did a permeant job of plugging up the radiator leak in my 62 Chevy.😉

 

Paul 

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Heard about rice in a radiator but never saw any sealer that really worked. I put moth balls in the engine compartment of a car that must sit in the grotto for a while but have lots of quasi-feral cats around. Bananas to quiet a noisy rear end but 140 usually works better. I keep spare batteries in plastic marine boxes also use to keep the equipment closet alive.

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Transmission shop on Long Island that my brother worked in used chop meat to quiet trans and rear axles.  State finally closed them down for illegal State inspections. 

 

Paul

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Posted (edited)

Sounds like a real chop shop to me.I heard of an AAMCO by me that had a salt shaker filled with metal filings that they would sprinkle in the customers trans.pan to convince them that they needed a rebuild.My boss(owner) of a shop I worked for repainted torque converters and sold them as rebuilt.I'm glad I quit.

Edited by Buick35
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1 hour ago, joe_padavano said:

Your plastic-cased battery will discharge if set on a concrete floor...

 

But apparently it won't discharge on the conductive METAL battery tray that it sits on in the car. 🙄

Except your metal car sits on nonconductive rubber tires

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1 hour ago, 72caddy said:

 Haha, i still put my batteries on a wood on top of concrete! 

what is the opinion on covering tires on trailers with garbage bags or other covers to prolong the life

Something to be said about blocking the sunlight I suppose. I know that the tires on my cars that sit mostly in my garage don’t seem to experience anywhere near as much dry rot as the ones that sit outside all the time

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3 hours ago, TheMoneyPit said:

Sand in the tires is a true story, during the First World War there was also a rubber shortage just like the second war and loading tires was cheaper than a replacement 

 

The biggest shortcoming of the RR Armored Cars used in the western Desert in WWI was the tires...not because they couldn't get them but they could be shot and go flat. Supposedly the fix was to cut a hole in the tire and fill it with wet concrete...made it bullet proof (literally). Of course they were never driven very fast and never on a paved road - usually sand or gravel. They also had a steel bullet-proof cover for the radiator that could be closed when going into action.

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Synthetic oil eats seals.

 

High-octane gas is better for your engine than regular.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

Except your metal car sits on nonconductive rubber tires

 

If there was a conductive path through the bottom of the battery, it would short itself out and discharge to the battery tray since the negative terminal is already connected to chassis ground, so again, tell me why a non-conductive plastic battery case will discharge on non-conductive concrete but not on the metal battery tray.

Edited by joe_padavano (see edit history)

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3 hours ago, Buick35 said:

Did you hear about the guy who was arrested on battery? They locked him away in a dry cell.

 

 

My son wanted to sell a dead car battery and asked me what he should price it at. 

 

I said "free of charge".

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Rolls Royce hoods are factory sealed and, of course, Model Ts were originally designed to run on alcohol but JD Rockefeller and the oil barons forced the gubment to institute prohibition. foiling the evil plot of Henry Ford to control the nation's fuel supply

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Some years back I decided to test the claim that leaving a battery on a cement floor will discharge it. So I left a plastic case, 12V battery I knew to be good on the garage floor. Checked the voltage every day for almost a week. It did not discharge. Then forgot about it for 2 more weeks. When I tested it, it was dead as a door nail. Nothing at all. Tried charging it up but it would not take a charge. This is the only time I ever had this happen. I have other spare batteries I store on a wooden shelf and charge up every few months and they stay good for years.

 

All I can say is, try it for yourself. Buy a new battery leave it on a cement floor in the basement or garage for a month and see what happens. I know a guy who thinks I am a fool for believing this, he leaves his spare batteries on the garage floor all the time. He also buys new batteries 2 or 3 times a year.

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Posted (edited)

Use of detergent oil in an old car, especially one that had lived on a diet of non-detergent oil, would break loose deposits of sludge, causing bearing failure. Engineering studies have proven that this old wives tail is simply untrue. 

Edited by Buffalowed Bill (see edit history)

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