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PFitz

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PFitz last won the day on January 16 2019

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  1. With black wall tires, varnished spokes stand out even more. Paul
  2. I've looked in the two most recent Registers and can't find a listing of any Series 153 "Town Sedan". The only Town Sedans are Series 151. And, the Series 15 Operators manual does not list a "Town Sedan" in Series 153 either, so can't search by body code number. Just some as "Town Cars" - typically a division window limo with a Chauffeur top like Tom Hubbard's. Since the artist drawing Walt posted does not have the typical Town Sedan landau bars, I wonder if the title could be a typo ???? Paul
  3. Bill, If there was ever a Franklin that could look like it just saw a ghost,... those headlights do it. 😆 Paul
  4. Two '30 Series 147 Roadsters. Maybe Walt knows the details of where they are ? One with the Motor Wheel Corp. demountable wood wheels in what is likely "natural" varnished finish. The other with Motor Wheel wire wheels. Both appear to be later '30, after the change to the smaller fender parking lights about 1/4 way through production. Paul
  5. May not be a picture of Amelia's, but the same model as her '31 Series 153 Convertible Coupe. Note the Autogyro as a nod to one of her early records.
  6. Captain Hawks on the left and his '31 Dietrich convertible Speedster. He was another early aviation record setting pioneer. He and that car also appeared in other Franklin advertising pictures. And lets not forget that Amelia Earhart had two Franklins. A '31 Series 153 Convertible Coupe- also used in Franklin ads, and later a V-12 Sedan. Paul
  7. A Town Sedan that never was. Also interesting that it lacks the typical landau bars of many Town Sedans. At a first quick glance I thought it was a Club Sedan. Paul
  8. That would depend on who is sitting on it. 😉 Paul
  9. Tight, straight grain, with no knots is usually a good indication of slow-grown second growth, verses wider growth rings and wavier grain for first growth of the same species of wood. I doubt a company like Motor Wheel Corp. was passing off first growth hickory on Franklin, Packard, Pierce-Arrow, and other industry top auto engineers that specified second growth woods. They tended to be very good at testing the products that they were supplied would meet specification. Paul
  10. It was not uncommon to see "second growth" specified for automotive wood use. Sometimes even the specifying of "quarter sawn" for certain structural wood to reduce chances of warping. Example; The Franklin factory drawing for their 19 inch wooden demountable wheels used from '29 to '32 and made by "Motor Wheel Corp. Lansing Mich" specified second growth hickory. And the same drawings specify to use "Murphy Heavy Transparent Primer" for natural finish spokes. Motor Wheel Corp. wooden spoke wheels were used by other high-end auto manufacturers, also
  11. Some of the mid 1920's Stewart Warner vacuum tanks had a special tee fitting on top for a thin vacuum line going through the firewall and up the windshield corner post to the wiper motor. Paul
  12. And Derham set it in a cast bronze frame that took two people to put back in.😬 Same heavy cast bronze frame, but slightly taller in the wife's Series 153 Derham limo. Paul
  13. Yup. And between the underside of the wiper motor and top of the steering wheel, only a 2-1/2 inch high view looking straight ahead. The owner refers to that windshield as, "the gun slit." Paul
  14. PFitz

    old oil

    This is what has work for me for 40 years. I have soak tanks with a lid filled with used lacquer thinner from washing out paint spray guns and soaking carburetors. Have yet to find any old oil or grease it doesn't loosen after a few days soaking. Paul
  15. Looks somewhat like a knockoff of the Delco Lovejoy double action shocks of the early 30's. Girling is a company that made British brake systems. Maybe it's from the UK ? Paul
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