PFitz

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PFitz last won the day on January 16 2019

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  1. My 33 English Austin has four wheel cable drum brakes. The emergency/parking brake lever also operates all four drums, not just two like most parking brakes. Great when having to change a tire or "tuning" the cables. Paul
  2. Yes. My 2008 Ford Taurus has cables to actuate the rear discs as parking brakes. Paul
  3. Had that happen to a 1910 Touring during a week long tour. Panic stop in town traffic broke the drive shaft and the car rear-ended a truck. Lucky, no one hurt and not much damage. That same driveshaft foot brake design was used up until 1928 when replaced by four wheel hydraulic brakes. Paul
  4. PFitz

    PPG Paint

    Have you tried locating your nearest PPG supplier and seeing if you can order through them ? Some PPG autobody shops will also order for you. My PPG supplier can still order some of the acrylic lacquer colors, plus the different shop temp thinners. Paul
  5. Some of my customers use their cars almost daily when there is no snow and salt on the roads, so they are not what I would consider "pampered" as in never being out much. And all my modern cars are not what anyone would call pampered. They've always been outdoor vehicles parked in sun year-round. I buy them used and keep them at least ten years. No signs of armor-all caused damage inside or out on the often driven antiques or my modern cars. Maybe living in the country with clean air and not with city air is the answer ? Paul
  6. Current ? I've been using it since the 1970's and had no problems. Customer's cars I restored in the 1980's and 90's, that I used Armor-all on the tires, cobra grain tops and accessory trunk coverings, and rubber and linoleum running board covers, show no signs of cracking. Even Lester tires I put on a full restoration in the later 1980's, refurbished that car for a new owner a few years ago and it's been to car shows since, have no cracks. Maybe it was something else causing the problems, like environment of where/how the vehicles were stored, or products used to clean them ? I'm not trying to sell Armor-all, I'm just surprised to hear others had problems after my experience having used it on my personal cars since it came on the market, and in my restoration business of 40 years. Paul
  7. Strange results I've never heard of before. I've been using Armor-all since it came out, on my modern cars, and my customer's old cars - tires, vinyl tops, plastic trim, rubber door and windshield weather seals, linoleum running boards - and never had any problems. The only thing I've seen better was 30 years ago stuff called Clear Guard which was like Armor-all but thicker viscosity and lasted longer. Around here, every fall, we make sure to Armor-all the door weather seals on our modern cars so we can open them when the temps get below freezing after a damp spell. Paul
  8. Try Metro Molded Parts. http://www.metrommp.com/ http://www.metrommp.com/index.cfm?f=part_list_by_type&Type=Bumpers - Door or Steele Rubber. https://www.steelerubber.com/ You'll likely have to make the sheet metal clips that hold them. Paul
  9. There are automotive paints and flex additives designed to be used on plastics, such as modern car bumpers and trim. They've been around for 40 years so it's no guessing game. Check with your local autobody supply. There are upholstery repair kits with special paints designed for use on vinyls. Check with Mohawk Finishing Products. https://www.mohawkproducts.com/ Rustoleum is not flexible enough to keep up with vinyl top flexing while driving. Like all enamels, after a few times parked in the hot sun, it will harden and then crack with the flexing of wind turbulence of driving . Then you have a mess to deal with. There's one thing to try that won't harm the top. Wash the vinyl well with mild detergent, like Dawn dish soap. Just like washing a car, don't do it in direct sun light. Rinse well and dry it and then coat with Armor-all, or equivalent vinyl protection. In the meantime, you can start studying up on how to replace the top here, Paul
  10. Maybe they are moving it south to Saratoga Springs ? Hemmings has had a show at the car mueusm there for a few years and with it being in a large park, there's much more room than in Lake George. Paul
  11. Under the heading of horse out of the barn,..... mashing the ends of stuck pins and fasteners can be prevented. Anytime you need to drive out a stuck pin, use a drift pin that is close to the same diameter and slightly undersized for the hole. Make sure the end of the drift is ground flat and 90 degrees to the drift. Otherwise, if it's not perfectly flat it will mash out the stuck pin and make it a tighter fit. And if the pin end is protruding, avoid hitting the end of the pin directly with a hammer face that is a bigger diameter than the pin. Especially if the hammer face is not perfectly flat. That's like peening a rivet to mushroom. I have a roll-around tool box drawer full of different length and diameter drifts. Some steel, some brass, and some made of hard wood, for different situations and materials. Paul
  12. As late a 1930 that I know for certain. A friend's 30 La France 6 cyl 1000gpm pumper had three, two-cylinder T head jugs. Great big heavy things, too. Took he and I just to carry one jug. And we had to lift them up onto the engine base using two separate block and tackle rigged between two trees in his driveway. Paul
  13. The two lowest banks were still angled slightly up from the horizontal (7.5 degrees), and not downward like the lower cylinders of aircraft radial engines. So oil drained down the cylinders away from the pistons not toward them. You can see the slight up angle of the two lower banks in the lower picture Tinindian posted of the light green engine. Paul
  14. PFitz

    Fabric top

    Your welcome. But,...…. as the saying goes,..., without pictures it didn't happen. 😁 Paul
  15. Yes, and it did pan out eventually. The Ford was one of at least four engine designs used in the Sherman. The Ford GGA is said to be the biggest production V-8 ever built at 1100cid, with DOHC 48 valves and 500HP @ 2600rpm. https://www.warhistoryonline.com/instant-articles/v8-ford-gaa.html Paul