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GARY F

I got sick last night

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As I was surfing the TV last night I came across Iron Resurrection program. They took a beautiful solid 35 Chevy and with all good wood and pulled the body and were going to rework the frame to put in a SBC and different drive line.and customize the body. A perfectly good car and they ruined it. As soon as they said that I turned that program off.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

This kind of butchery has been going on for a while.

 

I recall how shocked sickened I was by Boyd Coddington's rape and dismemberment of a beautiful 1936 Ford Coupe so he could make a fake roadster out of it. 

 

Then there is gAss Monkey Richard and Chip Foose--more butchery.   Some nice cars destroyed for entertainment.  And then they move on to the next "build." 

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A few years back, at a local show, I saw an Auburn that was the victim of an amateur street rodder. My comment on this forum was "it made me want to puke". I was criticized for my less than gentle choice of words. I usually try to choose my words carefully. Let me say again. When I see this happen it makes me want to puke..............Bob

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)
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It sure is a disgusting , disgraceful gutshot. No respect whatsoever.   - Carl 

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I remember the NSRA Nationals on Louisville KY in 2002 where I saw several high end antique Luxury cars retrofitted with newer drive lines an interiors.   AWSOME design and workmanship!   They are the exception, for every masterpiece there were dozens of missed opportunities  to save an unusual car.  Done right they cost a lot more to do than just restoration.

I'm sure none of the owner/builders intend to miss their mark, but that happens on face lifts too.   Personalization of antique cars limits their salability to others with the same distorted taste.   I think those folks gather annually in Arizona for the personalized car auction. 

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I saw the end of the program.  This was a solid car that was turned into a restomod but the exterior was left alone.  They kept the chassis although they boxed the frame rails and added support for the 350 Chevy engine.  As these types of cars are done I had to admit it was a good looking car...original grille, sidemount and dash.  It actually would not take all that much to return it to its stock form although you would need a good donor undercarriage as it is all modern underneath.  I at least liked listening to the reverence these guys gave to the era of car building.  They seemed impressed. 

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I agree with Steve. Seems like shows based west of Texas have less reverence than those from the East though the bottom line is "whatever the owner wants". Agree some rare and desirable cars should not be touched but mass production cars ?

 

Of course having worked for GM in the '70s (and having had some cars very rare and desirable cars today but just inexpensive race/fast cars at the time (like a Devin-Jag and a FI Split-Window). Today my Reattae and Crossfire get no respect so more of the same.

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1 hour ago, Steve Moskowitz said:

I saw the end of the program.  This was a solid car that was turned into a restomod but the exterior was left alone.  They kept the chassis although they boxed the frame rails and added support for the 350 Chevy engine.  As these types of cars are done I had to admit it was a good looking car...original grille, sidemount and dash.  It actually would not take all that much to return it to its stock form although you would need a good donor undercarriage as it is all modern underneath.  I at least liked listening to the reverence these guys gave to the era of car building.  They seemed impressed. 

Like the show, and record it every week, talented guys turning out quality work. Never knew Chevrolet offered a forward opening door model in the '30's, also good to see folks start with a good solid car, saves the owner money. There are far too many save the rotted Mustang shows. Finished product must be worth three times what the car would be worth stock. Bob

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In the future when originals will be unobtainable at any price, these self proclaimed "artists" who mutilate these cars today in order to fulfill their own self-absorbed egos will surely be cursed.

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Well, I've noticed that the new generations, if they like old cars at all, want them street rodded.  They don't care about preserving the past.  Street rodding is a different hobby than Old Car Restoration.  They have very different goals and taste.  Comparing them is like comparing Classical Music with Rap.  They are just not comparable!!!

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18 minutes ago, marcapra said:

Well, I've noticed that the new generations, if they like old cars at all, want them street rodded.  They don't care about preserving the past.  Street rodding is a different hobby than Old Car Restoration.  They have very different goals and taste.  Comparing them is like comparing Classical Music with Rap.  They are just not comparable!!!

 

Very true! I always felt that the restorer's have a respect for history. If I want to drive a car that feels like a modern car then I will drive my new car. I saw an ad for some show on Wednesday night where the owner gets his dream to butcher up a 62 Chevy Bubbletop. I guess I am watching baseball tomorrow night 

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I've been approached a number of times when showing my 45000 mile unrestored 1940 Packard 110 coupe by guys wanting to buy it  (and offering good money).When I ask what they would do with it,it's always the same. Oh,I'd drop in a big block Chevy,tub the rear wheel wells,use a shortened Mustang rear end,blah,blah,blah.I suggest they walk away before I hurt them.

I haven't even shown my recently rediscovered 1925 Buick coupe and a similar fate has been suggested for it.

Jim

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If you didn't see the beginning of the show, you didn't see what the owner wanted.  He got exactly what he asked for and paid for.  The shop did a good job delivering that and they are in the business of making money.

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Sadly, this is the future of the hobby. Resto-mods are what the current crop of buyers and owners want. Think about the cars you love--there's a touchstone somewhere in your past that connects you to that car. Either you owned one in your youth or your father or grandfather had one. There's a connection and through that connection, you understand its strengths and weaknesses. My father drove a 1941 Buick Super coupe to work every day when I was a kid in the 1980s. Hence my love for 1941 Buicks. Had I not been exposed to that, however, would I even know what a 1941 Buick was? Would I want one? And would I want one if I knew it was limited to 55 MPH?

 

Buyers under, say, 70 years old, don't really have any direct connection to cars older than the 1960s. They might know muscle cars and be connected to that era, but anything beyond the late 1950s might draw a blank for them. They like the looks of older cars, but there is an overwhelming impression that anything older than the 1960s is completely unusable in today's world, and possibly even unsafe. You and I know that's not true, but how many people do we get on this very board asking about 12 volt conversions and disc brakes and radial tires, all because they are under the impression that a car without those things is unusable.

 

So the hot rods and resto-mods are born. Owned and financed by guys who like the look but have no idea (and don't care) about originality or how the cars are "supposed" to be. I struggle to sell flathead Ford V8s to anyone younger than 70 years old because the moment I tell a younger person, "It's got 85 horsepower, but it's fun!" their eyes glaze over and they wander over to look at the Camaros. I had a young couple here just yesterday saying they wanted a '30s or '40s 4-door sedan with suicide doors and big enough for their whole family. So I showed them a variety of stuff, including a 1930 Cadillac, a 1941 Buick, a 1940 Ford sedan, and ultimately a 1937 Ford sedan that looks stock but--you guessed it--has a 350 Chevy in it. Guess which one they preferred? Why did they prefer it? Easy to start, easy to drive, easy to maintain (yes, the same is true of a stock 1937 Ford, but to an outsider, an old engine is scary), and 75 MPH cruising.

 

THAT is the future of the hobby and that is why the TV shows show it (whether the TV shows are feeding the impression that old cars can't be used as-is is a different discussion, I suppose). People with no connection to old cars who have only grown up with fuel injection and bulletproof reliability that starts and idles perfectly even in -30 degree snowstorms, well, they don't want to learn about fussy carburetors and ignition points and 45 MPH cruising speeds. It makes me very sad (and worried because this is how I make my living) but the hot rod industry has done a much better job of marketing itself to the general public than the restoration/stock old car industry.

 

That Chevy has a new lease on life, but only because the guy building it doesn't know any better about what it was versus what it could be.

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Matt, I guess my two brothers and I are the exceptions. 

 

We are in our early 50s; we appreciate and have youthful connections to unmodified pre war cars. 

 

When we were kids my dad owned a 1937 Ford Fordor and a 1941 Buick Series 90.  He also had a 1953 Chevrolet and 1956 Buick back then

(I went with him to pick up that Chevy).

 

Not only was our family involved in the old car game, we knew other old car enthusiasts with the same sensibilities; so we were lucky in that sense.  

 

I am a trained historian so to me  it is really thrilling to experience actual 1930s / 1940s style motoring in a stock offering from that era. 

 

The fact that my father had these old cars around influenced us boys to buy our own old cars.  And we like them stock. 

 

We were lucky to have that exposure back in the late 60s and 70s. 

 

We will see what happens to the hobby once my dad's generation start dying off and their cars hit the market.  Hoping for the best on the preservation front. 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Pomeroy41144 (see edit history)
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Younger folks want to be different in any and every way they can.  Whether its their tattoos, piercings, hair colors, policital views (based on who they are talking to), or car modifications.  Every generation is different.  This one just feels that they all need to be different.  I have yet to see any benefit to it, but I'm just an old codgy 41 year old.

 

They fail to appreciate anything before them and want everything to revolve around them as if the past is completely irrelevant and similarly ghastly.  I deal with the general public daily, and that is my observation.

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I think that Matt has summed up this discussion correctly.  It makes sense that most have old cars that they have memories of when they were new or at least part of traffic on the roads when they were young.  I am old enough to remember cars of the 40's and 50's.  My Dad had a '40 Buick Super coupe that I remember and even came home from the hospital when I was born.  That is probably why I have my '40 Roadmaster coupe and it is my favorite car to drive.  I like the sound of the engine and especially the 1st gear whine of the transmission.  I am sorry to see the trend of restomods taking over the hobby, but that is life I suppose.

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1 minute ago, 39BuickEight said:

Younger folks want to be different in any and every way they can.  Whether its their tattoos, piercings, hair colors, policital views (based on who they are talking to), or car modifications.  Every generation is different.  This one just feels that they all need to be different.  I have yet to see any benefit to it, but I'm just an old codgy 41 year old.

 

They fail to appreciate anything before them and want everything to revolve around them as if the past is completely irrelevant and similarly ghastly.  I deal with the general public daily, and that is my observation.

 

That's a good point. And in trying to be different, they're all exactly the same. Remember when tattoos and piercings were "dangerous" and "rebellious?" Now it's weird to see a 20-something without one or the other. The same is true with the cars that these shops are building. They're all the same. Small block Chevy, 3-speed automatic, 4-barrel carburetor, Ford 8- or 9-inch rear, some kind of Mustang II front suspension. It's boring as hell to look at, own, and drive. So they figure that by starting with something unusual, they'll end up with something interesting and fun. But they start by installing a small block Chevy, a 3-speed automatic...

 

Don't get me started on the CLC national meet a few weeks ago where there were five or six 1930s Cadillac sedans lined up (one wearing V12 emblems, one wearing V16 emblems--these were senior series cars), all of them with Chevy motors, Fatman front clips, and the same generic chrome wire wheels and whitewall radials stuffed into the sidemount wells. Oh, and they were all black. How boring.

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 I think this Resto-Mod thing is that people want the look of the older cars but want to be able to drive in the MODERN AGE in keeping up with the MODERN CARS, I have not Driven my Restored  Original 1956 Chevrolet 3100 on the roads where I live yet, I just take it to shows, I could see where driving with our local traffic would be problem, (would they have the patience to wait for me to get up to speed talking on there cell phones?), I drove a friend of mines 55 Chevy truck a few years back that had a S-10 conversion, It was nice, It seemed like a everyday driver, lots of pep, handled nice, it was just flat black, seemed like people looked at the truck some, but I thought it just fit in with the rest of the traffic, when I see a real original car cruising down the road, it stands out like a sore thumb, very noticeable, the styles compared to the modern cars (No Comparison), just to think that they where all over the roads back then, so I believe a lot of this MOD stuff has to do with the modern day traffic pushing you around and the styles no matter how much they Mod these cars out does not Compare I believe to the Original Auto's of the day, Sure I used to have 60's on my cars back in the 70's but the cars where still original from the factory, I will someday venture out with my 56 Truck and get the experience of driving it and getting the feeling of Original Factory again, I had a 1967  3/4 ton Chevy several years ago with a 6 cylinder 4 speed and it was fun to drive, I know the 56 will be not as good as the 67 in handling,  But I just hope I can maintain it in today's traffic, (I'm sure it will get the LOOKS),  I'm not a huge fan of the Resto-Mods, But they do handle better when driving around Modern Cars....:) 

Edited by Rooney3100 (see edit history)

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Ouch! Harsh words for the custom/street rod/hot rod world. I have been to Hershey, I have seen all of those unsold cars go home. I get Hemmings, I see all of those unsold cars get relisted. I got harped on for what I did to our 54 XK120 Roadster. It was for sale, I watched it get listed for sale a few times. Priced right, complete car, no buyers. So I bought it, my car. There is no right or wrong with cars. You need a balance in everything, if all cars were restored, only color would be the difference. I like them all, great to see quality work from both sides of the car world.  

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Some cars are not worth restoring but make wonderful hot rods. Variety is a good thing. I know plenty of collectors who own cars they did not "grow up with". People do not have to have a memory of a car to want it. I know of guys in their early to mid 30's who own 1920's and 1930's cars. I have been in collections with restored cars, hot rods, and resto-mods all living under one roof. When we are prejudiced against one type of car we all miss out. I do not think anybody will be buying show cars at Pebble Beach and installing LS crate motors any time soon.

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Everybody get ready for Richard Rawlings new TV show................... He is going to travel the country and show restoration shops how to turn a profit. Sort of like Bar Rescue with wheels.

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18 minutes ago, Brass is Best said:

Everybody get ready for Richard Rawlings new TV show................... He is going to travel the country and show restoration shops how to turn a profit. Sort of like Bar Rescue with wheels.

 

 

Yes, you summed it up great; Car Flipper gAss Monkey Richard is not a "Car Guy", he is a Money Guy.   Thanks for the warning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Pomeroy41144 (see edit history)
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