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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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This is a V.E.C. electric bus built in Brooklyn, NY by the Vehicle Equipment Company , location is south east of Penn Station in New York CIty at the Flat Iron Building on 5th Avenue.

Second photo is circa 1926 of a Panhard with torpedo body by Belvalette

Third photo is a Hispano Suiza Torpedo Grand Tourisme by coach builder Alin Liautard also circa 1926

VECelectricBUS ca1905inNYC.jpg

PANHARDca1926.jpg

HISPANOsuiza1926maybe.jpg

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2 hours ago, Walt G said:

This is a V.E.C. electric bus built in Brooklyn, NY by the Vehicle Equipment Company , location is south east of Penn Station in New York CIty at the Flat Iron Building on 5th Avenue.

Second photo is circa 1926 of a Panhard with torpedo body by Belvalette

Third photo is a Hispano Suiza Torpedo Grand Tourisme by coach builder Alin Liautard also circa 1926

VECelectricBUS ca1905inNYC.jpg

PANHARDca1926.jpg

HISPANOsuiza1926maybe.jpg

It's a good thing that that bus has solid rubber tires!.......and then there's stopping it, or should I say trying to stop it.

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24 minutes ago, Ben P. said:

I was looking for pictures of 19 ‘teens camping furniture when I ran across these photographs on this strange but delightful website⬇️
https://sausageheavenoutdoors.com/vintage-arrowhead/

 

(I’m bewildered by the guy’s use of the word ‘wold’. It’s no typo - he uses it repeatedly. It’s not Swedish or German. What the H is a wold?)

DC68B384-296A-4E3B-B5C2-C503D3C1C6D1.jpeg.f0f1a42085956762555d27c3c2f70827.jpeg

0966253F-395C-4ECA-87F8-6EA4341F9A99.jpeg.ea93ef82e8d45617fc4427dd20839a50.jpeg

I don't understand. The photo says Timber Wolf, not Wold. However, according to Wikipedia the word wold is explained as:

The name Wold is derived from the Old English wald meaning "forest", (cognate of German Wald, but unrelated to English "wood", which has a different origin).[1] Wold is an Anglian form of the word, as in other parts of England, different variations can be found.[3]

Over the years the meaning has changed from "forest" to "open high ground". Wold originally would have applied to high forest land. However when the forest was cleared, it is probable that the original name survived. This was particularly true in the Cotswolds, the Lincolnshire Wolds and also the Yorkshire Wolds.[1] 

I just couldn't resist looking it up

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The sight seeing bus was electric powered and probably was not designed to go fast so people could linger looking at what was on view, also if power from the batteries was cut down or off the weight of the vehicle and passengers would have slowed it down ( kinda like letting up your finger pressure on an electric, battery powered drill) Steering that huge machine was what makes me think that it must have been very interesting to accomplish, even with the paved city streets. the rear wheel seems to have a bit behind it that probably was a disc that was part of the braking system.  Someplace a ladder was stored to let people climb up into and down from their seats.

Interesting to note that only perhaps two people are not wearing hats or caps. Everyone had high button collars and the women there had to be careful not to show an ankle getting in or out as that would have been just to much "flash".

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13 minutes ago, Walt G said:

The sight seeing bus was electric powered and probably was not designed to go fast so people could linger looking at what was on view, also if power from the batteries was cut down or off the weight of the vehicle and passengers would have slowed it down ( kinda like letting up your finger pressure on an electric, battery powered drill) Steering that huge machine was what makes me think that it must have been very interesting to accomplish, even with the paved city streets. the rear wheel seems to have a bit behind it that probably was a disc that was part of the braking system.  Someplace a ladder was stored to let people climb up into and down from their seats.

Interesting to note that only perhaps two people are not wearing hats or caps. Everyone had high button collars and the women there had to be careful not to show an ankle getting in or out as that would have been just to much "flash".

Walt, I can't see the ladies of the times climbing a ladder to get in/on the bus. I'm sure they had an emergency ladder, but my theory is there must have been a platform at the sight seeing base headquarters. After all it's just not lady like to climb a ladder in public, not to mention someone touching them for support! That would have been worse than showing ankle. haha

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(I’m bewildered by the guy’s use of the word ‘wold’. It’s no typo - he uses it repeatedly. It’s not Swedish or German. What the H is a wold?)

 

More than likely fat fingers or poor typing skills, with no proofreading (d next to f on keyboard).

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, J. Hawkins said:

J-???

x1931_12_02_The_Chicago_tribune_and_the_Daily_news__New_York_Retronews[1]-1.jpg

Sadovich was a very active dealer of Duesenbergs in Paris. He always made sure as many cars as possible got good press coverage in all the car periodicals in France such as La Carrossiere, Omnia , La Vie Automobile , Le Equipment . Not sure what connection he had developed with the A-C- D Company in Indiana , but it obviously was a good one and he was well known by coach builders in both France and England. I believe he even had a sales piece published in France on Duesenberg specifically. I have seen it and may even have one here someplace.  Sadovich would also make sure that there was a Duesenberg at the annual Salon in Paris and the concours in Monte Carlo and near Paris. The cars received good press at these highly acclaimed social events for the rich and famous and wannabes.

Walt

Edited by Walt G
typo (see edit history)
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This old, yellow newspaper was too big to scan, but it's an interesting piece about the opening of Packards In Hollywood, 6660 Sunset Blvd, Douglas Longyear's Packard Dealership.  As you'll see if you click on this VERY detailed link, it went on to be WH Collins Packard, and then Howard Buick, and then a mini-mall. https://jhgraham.com/2020/12/13/6660-sunset-longyear-packard-howard-motor-co-buick/   I think the Southern California CCCA magazine "The Sidemount Mirror"  published something on this topic also.

 

PackardsInHollywood3.JPG

PackardsInHollywood2.JPG

PackardsInHollywood1.jpg

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14 hours ago, Robert G. Smits said:

Another Electric NYC sightseeing bus from 1905

55E25358-7E15-4E70-824D-0EB34FA270CD.jpeg

No stairs, no platforms to get up in or out to be seen. Yikes , just newsboys up at the left of the photo hawking the latest newspaper. Today everyone would be looking at their personal phone for the latest news, back then most people didn't have a phone either and if they did it was a "candlestick" version or perhaps even mounted to a wall. Yes, I like the printed word, so love paper, and yes I have a candlestick phone on my desk from the WWI era that works and was at one time in a mansion on James Street in Syracuse, NY and rescued when the mansions there were torn down in the name of "progress". I know that comment will lead some of you to think "he is a fogey and a geezer" well perhaps, and I do not deny my favorite vehicles have running boards - old or new.

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1 hour ago, Walt G said:

No stairs, no platforms to get up in or out to be seen. Yikes , just newsboys up at the left of the photo hawking the latest newspaper. Today everyone would be looking at their personal phone for the latest news, back then most people didn't have a phone either and if they did it was a "candlestick" version or perhaps even mounted to a wall. Yes, I like the printed word, so love paper, and yes I have a candlestick phone on my desk from the WWI era that works and was at one time in a mansion on James Street in Syracuse, NY and rescued when the mansions there were torn down in the name of "progress". I know that comment will lead some of you to think "he is a fogey and a geezer" well perhaps, and I do not deny my favorite vehicles have running boards - old or new.

Well you can't carry your candle stick or wall phone with you but, I found one suited to us old geezers.

hall.JPG

IMG_1385.JPG

Just for us old farts.jpg

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Cuba public transportation in the larger rural settings. These are trucks left over when the Russian’s pulled out and converted to people haulers. People will stand along the highway for hours trying to get a ride to the next town. Even in Havana the wait at a bus stop can be so long that they have vendors with food and drinks 

2BC1636E-1FB7-40B4-BE65-0A927D812446.jpeg

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Big truck in Cuba hauling people - well, it would be just right at home working the distance between the flea market fields at Hershey hauling people 🙃!

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One design feature that shows up occasionally on large cars in the early decades is the long, sweeping front fenders well before it became one of the primary aspects that renders the early 1930's Classics so appealing.  Except for a graceful, fillet transition to the running boards, the basic design is present.  The close-fitting front fender with long running boards were practical but lacked the graceful elegance.

 

Also seen in this image is another primary reason large seven passenger touring cars with powerful, big displacement engines, guessing Locomobile 48 here, are so rare now beyond their initial relatively low sales numbers due to their original high prices.  Once these behemoths entered the used car market, the cost to buy and maintain such a car was beyond the financial capability of the majority.   Their prestige having been usurped by the latest new luxury cars, only their capable utility and potential durability were qualities that made them useful as auto stage bus lines and for conversion to cargo and tow trucks.  The hard service lives thereafter pretty well extracted whatever use was to be wrung from them, except for the scrap prices gleaned from their material content.   Its amazing any examples are still extant.   

Unknown make touring auto stage Caliente, CA.jpg

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Walt G said:

Sadovich was a very active dealer of Duesenbergs in Paris. He always made sure as many cars as possible got good press coverage in all the car periodicals in France such as La Carrossiere, Omnia , La Vie Automobile , Le Equipment . Not sure what connection he had developed with the A-C- D Company in Indiana , but it obviously was a good one and he was well known by coach builders in both France and England. I believe he even had a sales piece published in France on Duesenberg specifically. I have seen it and may even have one here someplace.  Sadovich would also make sure that there was a Duesenberg at the annual Salon in Paris and the concours in Monte Carlo and near Paris. The cars received good press at these highly acclaimed social events for the rich and famous and wannabes.

Walt

I'm interested in what kind of car is on the photo. Obviously this is transformable cabriolet Hibbard-Darrin. There were 4 such cars produced: J-195, J-254, J-319 and J-361. Which one is in the photo?
Edited by J. Hawkins (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Ok boys........try this one on for size......ID please!

 

 

 

D7B16AF7-B38F-4657-8EA8-06A1DDCE8F8A.png

29ED43A1-DAD7-4815-B128-43CF7F5EB43A.png


 

Same marque, a bit later. And yes, it’s got an eight under the hood..........

 

 

 

 

9DEFCAA9-B555-4D30-97D9-232CDC54893E.png

F785FE54-5EB6-4177-8761-9ED575079B2D.jpeg

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Mr.Hawkins, the press release information of the era that the cars here were pictured in ( either print accounts in periodicals or photographs) do not note the cars serial numbers so you can't look "in the era" for that kind of information to get an answer. I have never seen any car "ID" for any make ever mentioned. The dealer or manufacturer was interested in selling the product not providing specific data on a specific car they had for sale. Historians who follow specific marques through their course of ownership/life may be able to chime in here with the knowledge you seek.

WG

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CRASH and BOOM and AXE - C - DENT. these photos were all taken ca. 1936-1942 in the Mineola, Garden City area of long island. and came from a pile of negatives that were being thrown away when the files a major local photo studio who was a commercial photographer in that era were being disposed of 50+ years ago. I managed to borrow the negatives that a friend had picked from the trash and have prints made. SO much was just totally lost.

Anyway here are a few to make all of you think "oh geez, really" . This is what happened when the cars were only a few years old, dirt roads, wet conditions and narrow tires and no antilock brakes. Ka Boom.

1931 Chrysler coupe with 1936 NY plates and the small tag above the license plate is for a parking permit for " Roosevelt Field, Worlds Premier Airport" ( yes that is the airport where Charles Lindbergh started his solo flight to Paris)

1941 Ford convertible with a hickey in the hood, but all kinds of accessories on the nose.

Have lots more but don't want to upset to many people looking at this.

ACCIDENT1931CHrysler.jpg

ACCIDENT41Ford.jpg

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16 hours ago, edinmass said:

Ok boys........try this one on for size......ID please!

 

 

 

D7B16AF7-B38F-4657-8EA8-06A1DDCE8F8A.png

29ED43A1-DAD7-4815-B128-43CF7F5EB43A.png


 

Same marque, a bit later. And yes, it’s got an eight under the hood..........

 

 

 

 

9DEFCAA9-B555-4D30-97D9-232CDC54893E.png

F785FE54-5EB6-4177-8761-9ED575079B2D.jpeg

Delage D-8 S?

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