Jump to content

Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

Recommended Posts

On 4/28/2021 at 7:20 PM, J. Hawkins said:

1.jpg

2.jpg

3.jpg

Unusual car ,never seen one before , looks 30s and I think it’s great , can’t make out the script on bonnet , what is it ? Thanks 

On 4/30/2021 at 12:05 AM, alsancle said:

A knew a kid in HS that has one of these.   And no, he didn't drop a 260 or 289 in to it.

SunbeamAlpine.jpg

Cool car then and now 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, Pilgrim65 said:

Unusual car ,never seen one before , looks 30s and I think it’s great , can’t make out the script on bonnet , what is it ? Thanks 

Cool car then and now 

Pilgrim65, this is an experimental ZIS-Sport car, produced in the USSR in 1939. It had a 6-liter 8-cylinder engine with 141 hp. Top speed 100 mph. One such car was produced, its fate is unknown.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok here we go from easy to difficult:  1: Make & approx year of car.  2: Who is riding in the back seat? 3: what country is this? 4: What City and exact date did this occur?

Daimler_000152.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Too easy for me, so I shall pass and let others play. Nice photo. 👍

 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, HK500 said:

Ok here we go from easy to difficult:  1: Make & approx year of car.  2: Who is riding in the back seat? 3: what country is this? 4: What City and exact date did this occur?

Daimler_000152.jpg

1946 Daimler.  

 

DE36(?)

 

Craig

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, HK500 said:

Ok here we go from easy to difficult:  1: Make & approx year of car.  2: Who is riding in the back seat? 3: what country is this? 4: What City and exact date did this occur?

Daimler_000152.jpg

Queen Elizabeth and hubby.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A junk car lot showing a pile of used wood spoke wheels, and one car with what appears to have a Tuarc steel wheel as its left rear.  This is an interesting photo that illustrates how wasteful of forest wood it was to not only create bodies for cars and to make wood wheel spokes.  Not just any cut of wood will do for a wood spoke.  There were a number of articles in the late teens and early 1920s about the depletion of second growth timber because of automobile production.  This subject area alone has a lot to do with supply and demand, conservation of forest products, economic production, and even recycling.

Junkyard 019.jpg

Junkyard 019 - Copy.jpg

Tuarc wheel ad.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"wasteful" - perhaps if viewed from today's perspective and values , thoughts about conservation etc. yes.  Take a step back to the era that that photo was taken - there were no real pressed steel body companies that were abundant , Budd of Philadelphia was one of the first in the mid 1920s.  Think also of how "wasteful" the use of coal to heat houses  was, provide fuel for stoves, fuel to power trains for mass transportation ( as defined in the era when there were no major air transportation nor coast to coast highways) also how ocean liners and most ships were fueled in that era. It is sometimes hard to put things in perspective if you are looking at things and stating a judgement call from what is current 80+ years later.  I am a local history historian as well, and it is often necessary to bring into reality for today's population why things "were so cheap" ( gasoline , taxes, new cars, used cars, house purchase) when the hourly wage was perhaps fifty cents. Gasoline was 16 cents per gallon.......

This is not a criticism of your statement , just trying again to put things into perspective .....

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

The 8 x 10 photo this comes from on the back in someones scrawl handwriting notes  Stutz Speedway chassis, Elsworth's back yard , New Cannan, N.Y.

I am guessing it was taken in the 1950s. Sorry it is so dark, but that is what I have.

STUTZElsworthbackyardchassis.jpg

Edited by Walt G
added information (see edit history)
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Walt G said:

"wasteful" - perhaps if viewed from today's perspective and values , thoughts about conservation etc. yes.  Take a step back to the era that that photo was taken - there were no real pressed steel body companies that were abundant , Budd of Philadelphia was one of the first in the mid 1920s.  Think also of how "wasteful" the use of coal to heat houses  was, provide fuel for stoves, fuel to power trains for mass transportation ( as defined in the era when there were no major air transportation nor coast to coast highways) also how ocean liners and most ships were fueled in that era. It is sometimes hard to put things in perspective if you are looking at things and stating a judgement call from what is current 80+ years later.  I am a local history historian as well, and it is often necessary to bring into reality for today's population why things "were so cheap" ( gasoline , taxes, new cars, used cars, house purchase) when the hourly wage was perhaps fifty cents. Gasoline was 16 cents per gallon.......

This is not a criticism of your statement , just trying again to put things into perspective .....

Remember when publicity photos of factories and foundries belching smoke from their multiple tall chimneys were a positive sign of prosperity and good times?

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, HK500 said:

Ok here we go from easy to difficult:  1: Make & approx year of car.  2: Who is riding in the back seat? 3: what country is this? 4: What City and exact date did this occur?

Daimler_000152.jpg

 

There is a story behind those Daimlers which by coincidence is due to appear in the next issue of Beaded Wheels, the national magazine of the Vintage Car Club of New Zealand. It seems that 12 were ordered from Hoopers the body makers for the proposed 1949 tour of Australia and New Zealand by then King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (parents of the current queen). The cars - four 'all-weather', three limousines, and five landaulettes - were built and shipped ready for the tour - six each for Australia and New Zealand. Not long after the ship left UK the king became ill and the tour was cancelled. The cars were put into storage to wait for the next tour. History dictated that didn't happened until the new queen and husband Prince Phillip travelled in 1953-54. The six NZ cars were stored at the Public Service Garage in Wellington. The NZ part of the tour lasted for 39 days and the necessary cars were flown around the country to be used as needed, depending on the weather and circumstance. The royal couple travelled by train and aircraft for some parts of the tour and the cars were used for parades etc.

 

Of the 12 cars, two intended for Australia were sold to India before the tour. Of the other ten, seven have survived; one is in the the USA and of the others three are in NZ and three in Australia. 

 

The photo above looks to have been taken in Australia and I think is the all-weather model chassis #51702.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

There is a story behind those Daimlers which by coincidence is due to appear in the next issue of Beaded Wheels, the national magazine of the Vintage Car Club of New Zealand. It seems that 12 were ordered from Hoopers the body makers for the proposed 1949 tour of Australia and New Zealand by then King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (parents of the current queen). The cars - four 'all-weather', three limousines, and five landaulettes - were built and shipped ready for the tour - six each for Australia and New Zealand. Not long after the ship left UK the king became ill and the tour was cancelled. The cars were put into storage to wait for the next tour. History dictated that didn't happened until the new queen and husband Prince Phillip travelled in 1953-54. The six NZ cars were stored at the Public Service Garage in Wellington. The NZ part of the tour lasted for 39 days and the necessary cars were flown around the country to be used as needed, depending on the weather and circumstance. The royal couple travelled by train and aircraft for some parts of the tour and the cars were used for parades etc.

 

Of the 12 cars, two intended for Australia were sold to India before the tour. Of the other ten, seven have survived; one is in the the USA and of the others three are in NZ and three in Australia. 

 

The photo above looks to have been taken in Australia and I think is the all-weather model chassis #51702.

As per the Daimler-Lanchester Owners Club site on surviving DE models:  DE Register | DLOC

 

A quote from a paragraph on the Royal Tour cars:

 

"Also in India, the Maharaja of Mysore bought at least four cars.

Firstly chassis 51703 (Hooper body number 9428), a DE36 allweather previously earmarked for the Royal Tour to Australia in 1953/54 and built in November 1948. This car is also in the Pranlal Bhogilal collection. The car, painted black, is in very good condition and running.  

Secondly, the Maharaja of Mysore bought chassis 51078, a Windover bodied DE27 from 1946, which is still in India in private hands and in great running condition.

Thirdly he bought DE36 chassis 51189, a Hooper bodied 8-seater limousine with body number 9201 also still in India, which is missing its body (and a few other essential parts) and which is going to be restored. And then the Maharaja of Mysore purchased chassis 51708 (Hooper body number 9495), the landaulette also surplus to requirements when the 53/54 Royal Tour was cancelled. This car is in the Manjusha Museum in Dharmastala, India and is being restored.

Finally, there is in India chassis 51116, a DE27 8-seater limousine with partitioning from November 1945 with Hooper body number 9221,  of which the condition is still unknown. This is probably also an ex-Mysore car. And recently (info December 2020) a DH27 with unknown chassis number was imported and restored in India."

 

Craig

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, 8E45E said:

As per the Daimler-Lanchester Owners Club site on surviving DE models:  DE Register | DLOC

 

A quote from a paragraph on the Royal Tour cars:

 

"Also in India, the Maharaja of Mysore bought at least four cars.

Firstly chassis 51703 (Hooper body number 9428), a DE36 allweather previously earmarked for the Royal Tour to Australia in 1953/54 and built in November 1948. This car is also in the Pranlal Bhogilal collection. The car, painted black, is in very good condition and running.  

Secondly, the Maharaja of Mysore bought chassis 51078, a Windover bodied DE27 from 1946, which is still in India in private hands and in great running condition.

Thirdly he bought DE36 chassis 51189, a Hooper bodied 8-seater limousine with body number 9201 also still in India, which is missing its body (and a few other essential parts) and which is going to be restored. And then the Maharaja of Mysore purchased chassis 51708 (Hooper body number 9495), the landaulette also surplus to requirements when the 53/54 Royal Tour was cancelled. This car is in the Manjusha Museum in Dharmastala, India and is being restored.

Finally, there is in India chassis 51116, a DE27 8-seater limousine with partitioning from November 1945 with Hooper body number 9221,  of which the condition is still unknown. This is probably also an ex-Mysore car. And recently (info December 2020) a DH27 with unknown chassis number was imported and restored in India."

 

Craig

 

Of course it was the 1948 tour that was cancelled. The Australian government chose to sell two of its Daimlers while they were still in transit as it felt four were enough.

 

The 1953-54 tour went ahead and, from the point of view of both New Zealand and Australia, was wildly successful. It was the first time a reigning monarch had visited that part of the world.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want to keep you early Ford guys happy too. I don't have many Ford images or promotional material, but if any car had some kind of body/coach work modification or special build I am interested . This is a Taxi Landaulet style N. 3 with body by Anchor Top and Body Company or Cincinnati, Ohio and dates from January 1920, so was designed and built in 1919. Are there any car guys in Cincinnati who can do some research to see if the building that Anchor was in still exists? I don't have a street address but can possibly find one. The taxicab, limousine, and landaulet bodies Anchor built on the Model T chassis were sold by the George W. Copp Co. Inc. at 518 West 58th Street in New York, NY.

That had to be only a showroom as in Manhattan that is the upper west side and was and is more for luxury living space.

There is just so much stuff that has never been seen since it was new that still exists in collections but rarely comes into view for many people to see. I hope that this thread continues to encourage that. Share the wealth everyone, share the knowledge, it will bring some good feelings to many and perhaps can give them a "wow - I never saw that before" moment , that all of us indeed need.

Walt

FORDttaxi1920.jpg

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is an interesting one Walt!

Ford, it is well known, built and sold a variety of Towncars, limousines, and landaulets from 1908 until about midyear 1917.  With the brass radiator cars ending with the 1916 model year, very few (relatively speaking) of the black radiator towncar/landaulets were built. One of the many mysteries of the model T is why did Ford stop making and selling the towncars? Although it was mostly a niche market, the towncars actually sold very well throughout their production from Ford, and the profit margin on them was high. Speculation is that Ford had all he could handle supplying the demand for regular cars, and the odd cars with limited markets just weren't worth the trouble to him. Across the nine years that Ford did build them, many thousands were sold! Because most of them first sold directly into taxi service, they were used hard, and very high mileage. Very few real original such cars survived anywhere near intact. Most were worn out and junked when little over five years old. About a third of the "Ford-built" towncars existing today were built up from very poor remnants of an original car. Maybe a quarter of the ones today were basically intact real original survivors. The rest, today, are re-fabrications, ranging in quality from very nice to really nasty.

Of course, the demand for model T taxicabs didn't end when Ford quit building them. Unknown numbers of body companies offered after-market bodies to fit the Ford chassis. Many of them had some sort of towncar or landaulet in their lineup. And the truth is, that very little is known about almost ANY of them! Several known survivors exist to this day, and easily half of them, nobody even knows who originally built the body!? Somehow, even the real survivors of these, seem to have lost their body builder's tags somewhere through the decades.

Several people have recreated such black era T towncars. A few are very nicely done. (Again, some are horrible!)

 

A lot of missing pieces to that puzzle! Thank you for sharing one piece of it.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wayne, that Copp Co. offered 6 versions of limousines and landaulets. the sales catalog shows 3 other ones plus a rear interior view.

It also lists details of the interiors and of construction , equipment and that they could be boxed for export! I believe I have a few other folders and catalogs on Model T coachwork not supplied by Ford Motor Company.  Copp notes that the bodies were hand painted with varnish and then sanded to perfection.
Brewster & Co. would finish that cars they did that same way. Just so many stories never told, it takes time to put the information together ( and know where to look to find it)  to get the accurate story and picture of how things were done. I have been doing this for decades and am still learning. It is not something you will find on Wikipedia. 🙄

The AACA magazine doesn't have the room for material like this, so I have been told. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did Henry ever sell his Model T (cars, not TT trucks) as "chassis only" to aftermarket body builders such as these?

 

Or were Model T passenger cars only sold complete, and left up to the aftermarket coachbuilder to remove and either discard, or reuse parts from the original body?

 

Craig

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Ford sold model Ts as chassis only, either with or without front fenders.

Note in the Ford dealer picture below, three bare chassis parked in the street! This particular dealer (I do not know anything about them beyond this photo!) may have had a good local customer or body builder providing bodies for specific or various local needs.

 

Photo had been shared on the MTFCA forum.

 

 

Forddealers19.jpg

Edited by wayne sheldon
Additional thought. (see edit history)
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, 8E45E said:

Did Henry ever sell his Model T (cars, not TT trucks) as "chassis only" to aftermarket body builders such as these?

 

Or were Model T passenger cars only sold complete, and left up to the aftermarket coachbuilder to remove and either discard, or reuse parts from the original body?

 

Craig

 

According to The Standard Catalog, in 1924 when the T runabout was at its lowest price of $260, a chassis could be bought for $225. Ford apparently sold quite a few thousand each year. 

 

 

There have been several photos of cars with aftermarket disc wheels posted here recently. This one for the 'Homecoming Parade in the town of Jasper, Alabama in 1923' was posted on a facebook page today.

 

Going by the sign on the front of the car it is a Buick, although the lights don't look right. As the Buick is a 1924 model it has to be quite late in 1923.

 

May be an image of standing and outdoors

 

Edit - I did these as two separate posts but the programme apparently thinks they should be posted together - which I disagree with.

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, J. Hawkins said:

Panhard pretended to be Duesenberg🤭.

tmp-cam-3372510484272767477.jpg

Panhard made some incredibly beautiful automobiles in the 1930-39 era. The Dynamic was particularly  swoopy just like in the USA the Chrysler and DeSoto Airflows ere. The larger Panahrds of the pre WWII era are really unknown in the USA as they had no import dealer as far as I am aware of in the USA or perhaps north America. Yes - I have a good source and quantity of period images on them too.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

There was a four-door Panhard Dynamic in the Portland Art Museum in 2018 at the 'Shape of Speed' exhibit.   

 

And I believe 'SebastienBuick' who regularly posts photos of local car shows in his native France has shown some Dynamics.

 

Craig

39_Panhard.jpg

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

According to The Standard Catalog, in 1924 when the T runabout was at its lowest price of $260, a chassis could be bought for $225. Ford apparently sold quite a few thousand each year. 

 

 

There have been several photos of cars with aftermarket disc wheels posted here recently. This one for the 'Homecoming Parade in the town of Jasper, Alabama in 1923' was posted on a facebook page today.

 

Going by the sign on the front of the car it is a Buick, although the lights don't look right. As the Buick is a 1924 model it has to be quite late in 1923.

 

May be an image of standing and outdoors

 

Edit - I did these as two separate posts but the programme apparently thinks they should be posted together - which I disagree with.

nzcarnerd:

 I love the photo as it shows the 1924 Model 49 7 passenger touring with Tuarc disk wheels.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just look at the signage behind the touring car and all the kids and their bicycles. All of that was hand painted /lettered or carved and mounted. No neon, or adhesive backed paste on anything for advertising.  That is what I find so fascinating with these photographs, what is beyond the cars, attached to decorative poles, wrought iron hardware to hang things from etc. None of it created electronically . It speaks of an era that we no longer can embrace. An era of non instant.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Walt G said:

Just look at the signage behind the touring car and all the kids and their bicycles. All of that was hand painted /lettered or carved and mounted. No neon, or adhesive backed paste on anything for advertising.  That is what I find so fascinating with these photographs, what is beyond the cars, attached to decorative poles, wrought iron hardware to hang things from etc. None of it created electronically . It speaks of an era that we no longer can embrace. An era of non instant.

One no longer sees those crank-operated storefront awnings anymore.   

 

Today, its heavy roll shutters that are substantially well built, completely covering the windows and front door after hours.

 

Craig

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/9/2021 at 2:15 PM, Captain Harley said:

A '29 Packard 640 roadster with a running board spotlight.  Instead of the stock factory supplied CM Hall spotlight mounted on the left windshield stanchion bracket.

There is something about running board spotlights that just get to me!🤩  I've got two of them:  one in my bedroom and one in the living room.🤪  The car and the light are just pure class!

Agree, Very elegant Car !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, twin6 said:

Not sure this was sold as chassis only.  More likely a car stripped down and made into a speedster (a very light speedster).

T stripped.jpg

What's a period photo? This was taken over fifty years ago. Not a speedster but a fun time tryout Model A before throwing the body back on.

-.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...