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Tools you really need


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Speaking of borrowed tools, the tools I lend out the most are my pickle forks.

 

My first pickle fork was Chinese.  So was my second & third.  Then I got a real set that has changable heads and will load up in a rivet gun (air hammer - but not like a Chinese air hammer).  WOW!  It's amazing how well these simple machines work when the material is the correct hardness!

 

Digital cameras are also one of the greatest inventions known to mechanics.  I started snapping pictures as I took things apart back in about 1999/2000, and I also take pictures of people holding my tools when they borrow them so I can document date, condition, and identity.

astro.jpg

Edited by SpecialEducation (see edit history)
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Safety devices, eye protection, ear muffs, and a pair of leather gloves. A respirator or face mask if you are painting, sandblasting or using chemicals known by the state of California to cause cancer. Bob H

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Somewhere around 1987 or '88 I think I was the only person in my circle of influence who owned a pitman arm puller.

 

Then, in the early part of this century I used to tease  my cardiologist about making being the last doctor to make house calls....  when he stopped to borrow tools.

 

Oh, anyone tempted to connect me writing "my cardiologist"  with my disparaging comments about "my mechanic" others make on the forum; Ted, my doctor passed away a few years ago and I do that work myself now, as well. Long walks by the Erie Canal and eating right. I do miss Ted, though.

Bernie

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30 minutes ago, Mark Shaw said:

High end cars from the teens through the 20s had tool rolls like this.  I have a friend with a 1918 Cadillac that has a tool roll like this with the original owner's name on each tool.  There is also a keyed compartment below the driver's seat for the tool roll.

I understand that some had a tool kit, but were all of the pictured tools in the kit?

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Mark, is that pouch/tool set up something YOU did for one of YOUR cars?

 

Are you saying in dim old days you could order from the factory a kit like that, with the tools you wanted?

 

I wonder if old-tank was asking, IS THAT PICTURED TOOL POUCH, SOMETHING THAT CAME WITH A CAR, or DID YOU/SOMEONE PUT IT TOGETHER?    

 

Just wondering,

 

Dale in Indy

Edited by smithbrother (see edit history)
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The one that my dad had had a socket the size of the lock nut on the handle, and the screwdriver head in the knurled knob.  Break the lock nut with one hand, and adjust the tappet with the other, then lock the nut down again.  He'd use his had that held the handle for the feeler gauge.  He'd never remove the tool from start to finish.

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Had a local farmer back here that said the only tool he needed was a sledge hammer, chain saw, and a crow bar. If that would not fix it then he had to call some one. I guess that make the telephone the most important tool to have. ;) Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Probably one of the most 'not knowing that you need it until you really need it' tool in any shop is a gallon jug full of Marvel Mystery Oil.  This is the best penetrating oil that I have ever used.  What more can a person say?

 

Terry Wiegand

The Kid from Doo Dah

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  • 8 months later...

In my short time messing with old cars, I've found an L-shaped box wrench works best for starters and a 90-degree box wrench with a drive end works best for distributors. And a match book for setting dual points. Also kind of silly, but if you're ever doing multiple carbs: take two Pepsi bottles (or Coke if you're that guy) and fill them half way with water. Then cut two holes in the top of each cap and run one piece of surgical tubing from one bottle to the other (all the way to the bottom of both bottles) and the other two pieces of surgical tubing to manifold vacuum ports on each carburetor (in my case, the hot air choke port on a Rochester 4GC). Seal the caps with glue and watch the water levels in each bottle for different atmospheric pressure. You'll know you did it right when the water level is the same in both bottles, successfully equalizing your carbs. 

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I walked into Farm & Fleet the other day. And there she was, gorgeous in every way. I was drawn to her and could not take my eyes off of her. I reached out to touch her, and a voice from behind me said No! You do not need another tool box! (It was my wife)

toolbox.PNG

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Some of the best "tools" aren't what we consider tools at all.  Here are some things I find useful:  Pieces of mirror glass with bendable 14 gauge copper wire glued on, cut in shapes to fit the occasion and need for seeing into inaccessible places, cue tips for cleaning and applying grease to small parts, medical syringes for getting glue or oil into tight spaces, aluminum angle iron bent down on the ends for making no-mar vise jaw liners, disposable plastic frozen dinner trays for temporary small parts organizers and catching small spills, unstranded fine gauge telephone wire for temporary light duty twist-ems, 14 gauge electrical wire strands for tie-offs such as tying brake calipers up while changing rotors, disposable funnels made from various plastic bottle necks as appropriate for a special purpose, plastic medical tubing with an enlarged end, cut to size for getting lubricant to hard to reach places, popsickle sticks for mixing things such as 2 part epoxy, Plastic newspaper sleeves with the closed end opened to put over your arms to keep from getting greasy when delving into awful spaces, cotton ball wads to hold rust penetrant on frozen nuts. 

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42 minutes ago, Dave Henderson said:

Some of the best "tools" aren't what we consider tools at all.  Here are some things I find useful:  Pieces of mirror glass with bendable 14 gauge copper wire glued on, cut in shapes to fit the occasion and need for seeing into inaccessible places, cue tips for cleaning and applying grease to small parts, medical syringes for getting glue or oil into tight spaces, aluminum angle iron bent down on the ends for making no-mar vise jaw liners, disposable plastic frozen dinner trays for temporary small parts organizers and catching small spills, unstranded fine gauge telephone wire for temporary light duty twist-ems, 14 gauge electrical wire strands for tie-offs such as tying brake calipers up while changing rotors, disposable funnels made from various plastic bottle necks as appropriate for a special purpose, plastic medical tubing with an enlarged end, cut to size for getting lubricant to hard to reach places, popsickle sticks for mixing things such as 2 part epoxy, Plastic newspaper sleeves with the closed end opened to put over your arms to keep from getting greasy when delving into awful spaces, cotton ball wads to hold rust penetrant on frozen nuts. 

 

  Dang it Dave, my garage will not hold all that!:P

 

  Ben

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