Dandy Dave

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Everything posted by Dandy Dave

  1. It is a disease that there is no cure for and it is highly contagious. Dandy Dave!
  2. Caterpillar in the early years Called them Motor Patrols. Even the parts books for my Cat model 12 say, "Number 12 Motor Patrol" on the cover. Huber called theirs a Road Maintainer. Dandy Dave!
  3. Love these old AC Model D's. I repaired and ran an AC Model DD about 20 years ago that had the low drive option and a loader on the rear to put rocks in and clean up around the grading sight. I also ran a 212 Cat quite a bit 30 years ago. Oh yeah, I have been to some of the HCEA shows with my small shovel. Hopefully will attend more in the future. Dandy Dave!
  4. 1. All you need is a Multimeter. It is handy for other things also like checking voltage, AC or DC, Continuity tests which works out great for checking faulty grounds and such. Olms, to check resistance and it gives you a value. Other stuff that I can't remember right now. 2. Often there is a grounding lug attached to one of the mounting screws. You can run a ground wire from that to a good place to ground like the frame. 3. The wire wrapping inside of the sending unit is a piece of Nichrome wire. If you measure it with a micrometer and get a resistance/ olms reading off of about one inch of it, and know the number of wraps, you could could get a piece and rewind the sending unit yourself if you have the patients to do so. Other wise there are places out there that will rebuild your old nearly impossible to get unit for you. Dandy Dave!
  5. Not at the moment as everything is shut down. You can stop by if you want and take a gander at it Billy. It lives at Wards Auto Collision Center just outside of the City of Hudson, NY. Dandy Dave!
  6. This is the second cab I've seen like this and it is a factory option. It has a heater and also came with a snow plow that I have to go pick up.
  7. I've been a member of HCEA for years Uncle Buck. True words about a grader operator. A road needs a crown. Most common folks just view the road as flat....
  8. Engine. Notice, a grader engine is in backwards. This grader is also 4WD.
  9. The engine. K428 Buda six cylinder flat head.
  10. .. for your old autos. Rescued a 1947 Austin-Western 99M Road Grader from the scrap man last week. I have it back here in the yard and it is ready to keep the dirt roads in good shape for the old cars around here. It is powered by an Allis Chalmers/ Buda K428 gas engine. Drove it 8 miles to get it here and it runs like a clock.
  11. Yes. The whole IHC line of tractors used ball bearings on both ends of the crank for many years. Started in the early twenty's and ended in the 40's with the last 10-20 built. They are proven in the field and even today it is rare when you have to replace them in one of these tractors after 80 to 100 years later. Dandy Dave!
  12. Yes. White made overdrive transmissions for vehicles with Balloon Tires. Very Cool. Should run circles around my White Truck. Dandy Dave!
  13. Agree. That Pontiac trans is a mess. Oil floats on water. If it filled with water high enough it would have pushed all the oil out any where it could. I did get a Shifter for the Olds. that I am working on. She is coming together nicely. Dandy Dave.
  14. Starting to wonder if it isn't a Bitsa. A bit of this and a bit of that. The Hub caps do look like a Caddy Chassis. The body from the cowl back does not. The fenders don't match much of anything. I bet it is an early salvage yard mix of parts of whatever they had to put a tow vehicle together.
  15. The Stutz remained right hand drive until 1921 at least if memory serves me right. Cadillac did not go left hand drive until1915. Also no cowl lamps like the Caddy's of the era. The windshield is straight up and those. Not slanted like in the photo. Not a Cadillac. If it is a Stutz it could be as late as 1921. The front fenders don't match any images I have found though. Dandy Dave!
  16. I have a patent. Could be used in the repair of autos. Self adjusting-aligning clamping device. Clamps two pieces of material together of either the same or different sizes straight and true every time. Peterson Manufacturing of the famous Vice grip pliers was interested at one time but did not want to pay any royalties.
  17. Rodger, The 86 Ford I'm working on has two fuel pumps. One in the tank, and one up stream on the frame near the steering box.
  18. Thanks for all the info. Got into it a little deeper today. The truck has been sitting since around 2004, so that is at least 15 or 16 years. Did a compression test today and it is low. Number one is 60 LBS, Number 2 is 35 LBS. Number 3 is 50, Number 4 is 60. Number 5 is 120. Number 6 is 60. Number 7 is 50, number 8 is 60. I put some oil in the cylinders and tried it again. and tested the lowest cylinder and it came up to 60. From what I have read the cylinders should be 120 or better across the board. It tries to start and must be hitting on the cylinder that is 120. I'm thinking the problem is the valves as I hear some of them leaking when I stop cranking it. Looks like it will require a teardown and a valve job. I read some where that low compression will cause a no run symptom in these engines. I tried the gas down the intake without any luck. I know a wheezing intake valve will push fuel back up into the intake. Yes there is spark at the plugs.
  19. This thing is 34 years old so I suppose it qualifies here. Solid old Ford truck that refuses to run. This is a OBD1 EFI system with a 5 liter/302 engine. Has great spark. Will jump 3 inches out of the coil. It is in time. The rotor goes around. Cap and rotor is good. It has a new fuel tank. New fuel pumps, New fuel filter, New injectors. Has 40 LBS of fuel pressure. Turns over but refuses to run. Will pop out of the exhaust once in a while. Timing is NOT out 180 Degrees. It did not have a battery in it for years so no codes in the system to retrieve. Any ideas about why this finnicky old pig won't run?
  20. Doing a little research I believe it is a Dayton Wire wheel. A similar wheel was used on cars of the twenties like a Stutz.