Terry Wiegand

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Terry Wiegand last won the day on December 5 2018

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About Terry Wiegand

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  1. Terry Wiegand

    AND THEN THERE WERE THREE

    If you go back and look at the photos that I posted on November 30, the one photo has the cracks circled. I spoke with Tom Noland earlier today and he said the casting repair would be finished this weekend. We will get it back home on the 23rd. He educated me about these early day castings. I learned that they have hard spots in them and of course this block had to have one of the cracks run right through one of the them. He was able to save the block and laughingly told me not to bring him any more like this one. I will post some photos when I get it home and have the freeze plugs installed. I want to give it one good coat of paint before it heads to the machine shop for rebuilding. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  2. Terry Wiegand

    Pre 1926 Buick Water Pump Rebuilding Procedure

    Hugh, Mark is right - this would make a great technical article for Dean Tryon's Newsletter. I was cryin' the whole time I was machining those packing nuts for my '16. After reading about what you and Larry DiBarry went through with your water pump shafts, I am now ashamed of myself for thinking that I had it bad. My late model 1922 and slightly older 1920 model has the same single piece shaft as the '16 does. Seeing what you guys are doing with what you have on your cars makes mine look downright antique. Here is a photo of the shaft for the '16 D-45. The impellor will be staked to the shaft and the Starter/Generator coupling will be taper-pinned when things go together for the final assembly. I think I am a little biased with my thinking that because the water pump on this engine bolts solid to the crankcase, it appears to me that this configuration lends itself to an easier assembly. I guess I'll find out when things go back together. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  3. Terry Wiegand

    1922 engine progress

    Mark, Since you are this far down with the engine, please let me make a suggestion to you. There is a company in Massachusetts that does the 'thermal cleaning' of castings (an engine cylinder block in this case) and this would be the best money that you will ever spend on the restoration of this engine. The rust and scale in the water jacket could very well choke your radiator core up right quick. The photo is of the cylinder block for my 1916 D-45 after the thermal cleaning. I am not real sure which thread on here mentioned the thermal cleaning, but, I'll bet someone on here could find it for you. I hope this information will be of some help for you. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  4. Terry Wiegand

    1925 Buick Standard Barn Raising

    Friends, Fun, and Old Buicks It doesn't get much better than that. Hugh, you da man! Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  5. Terry Wiegand

    Pre-War Buick Advertisements

    Here is the photo of the 1911 Buick that has me all excited. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  6. Terry Wiegand

    Pre-War Buick Advertisements

    Since you guys seem to like the really early material, here are a couple of photos of the 1911 Brochure and the Model 26 Roadster for 1911. If possible I'd be breakin' my arm to fill out an order form for that snazzy-lookin' Model 26 Roadster. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  7. Terry Wiegand

    Just joined the group

    Welcome Les, You have found the right place to talk early Buicks and get acquainted with some very knowledgeable Buick enthusiasts at the same time. Please post some photos of your car. We would like to see what you are working on. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  8. Terry Wiegand

    1922 engine progress

    Mark, It will probably be easier to drop the transmission and then pull the engine. That is what I am doing. Now, when things go back together, it might be easier to slip things back in all together. I am fixing to find the answer to that later this Summer. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  9. Terry Wiegand

    Pre-War Buick Advertisements

    George, You are absolutely right on as usual. After rereading what I put down - it didn't come out like I wanted it to say. In all of the times that I have ever driven the 1916, I don't think that I have ever really used the clutch brake. Double clutching is something that I really have never gotten into either. I was taught that pushing in on the clutch pedal lightly and the momentary pause (count one, two) move shift lever, release clutch pedal, and then ease on the gas and you are good to go. And I might add that I have never had any gear clashing either. I think it is a safe bet that you and I drive these old cars in the same manner. Thanks for keeping me sharp. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  10. Terry Wiegand

    Pre-War Buick Advertisements

    Before the synchromesh transmission came along everything was square cut gears. There definitely was a system to driving one of these vehicles. A lot of the cars like my 1916 had what was called a 'clutch brake'. The way that worked was that a person would push the clutch pedal down far enough to disengage the clutch, and then by pushing the pedal further down it would engage the brake to slow, or almost stop the transmission input shaft, so that the shift lever could move things to the next higher when moving forward. The way that I drive my non-synchromesh cars is that I use first gear to get the car moving, then push the clutch pedal in, move the lever to neutral, count to myself one, two, and then gently move the shift lever into second gear position, release the clutch and do the same thing all over again to move into high gear. It takes patience and practice, but the average person picks up the skill right quickly and they're headed right down the road very nicely. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  11. Terry Wiegand

    Pre-War Buick Advertisements

    Here is an interesting close up view of the 1908 Buick Model 5 engine on the manifold side. Almost from day 1 Buick touted their automobiles as having a Valve-In-Head engine. Look closely at this engine and you will notice that the intake valves are on one side of the cylinder and that the exhaust valves are on the other side. This is what is referred to as a T-Head engine. Looking closely again, you will notice that the valves are in the block and not over the top of the cylinder bore as in an OHV (Over-Head-Valve) configuration. I find this to be extremely interesting technical information about EARLY Buick automobiles. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  12. Terry Wiegand

    Pre-War Buick Advertisements

    Here are a few photos out of a 1908 Buick Brochure. This piece is too big to put on the scanner that I have, so, the alternative is to take photographs of the pages. I will add my comments on the second photo posting. If you guys out there like looking at the really early Buick material, I will post some more of it for you. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  13. Terry Wiegand

    Pre-War Buick Advertisements

    How about a 1908 Model F Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  14. Terry Wiegand

    AND THEN THERE WERE THREE

    Here is a photo of the back side. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
  15. Terry Wiegand

    AND THEN THERE WERE THREE

    The UPS guy just dropped off the clutch cone about 30 minutes ago. I had sent it out to Bob Knaak in California to have the new leather lining installed. I am very happy with the result. Don't you just love it when a plan comes together. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas