Morgan Wright

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Morgan Wright last won the day on December 10 2019

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About Morgan Wright

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    1k+ Senior Member
  • Birthday 11/05/1955

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Providence, Saratoga County, NY
  • Interests:
    Old Buicks

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  1. What are you doing for glass? My wife is an optician and can cut a piece of chem-hardened glass made for eyeglasses (shatter proof). That's what I did.
  2. Nickel plate on the brass? That reminds me of when I was young I used to work at Cadillac in Michigan. We took the steel bumpers and electroplated them with copper, then electroplated the copper with nickel, then electroplated that with chromium. They said chrome didn't stick to steel well enough for Cadillac standards so they used different layers like that.
  3. Not sure. I thought the '53 might have been a standard shift when I said it was easy. Not sure what to do about a dynaflow engine mounted to a standard transmission. I'm just a grease monkey.
  4. You have to reuse the motor mounts from the '37 but the '53 engine has the bolt holes already at the location for the '37 mounts, because so many people in those days replaced engines on cars, the engines were made to fit old cars. The '37 mounts are at the front of the engine and the '53 mounts are on the side, so you have to move them to the front of the engine, they bolt right in.
  5. I had a 1953 special engine (263) in a 1940 special. Much easier to find parts (rotor, cap, condenser, oil filter) are all at NAPA but the '37 parts aren't
  6. He didn't say he had a bad water pump. He just said it chews up packing. He didn't say he had a bad bushing either, or that the shaft was walking around.
  7. My packing nuts don't leak as much as they did at first, but if they start leaking again, I'd try to figure out a way to smooth the rusty shaft without having to take it out. It was a huge pain in the neck to take it out before. I had to jack the engine up a couple inches to get the timing gear cover off, drill out some taper pins, it was a huge pain. What about taking out the packing, replace it with a piece of green scotch pot-scrubbing pad you cut the same size and shape, which is impregnated with aluminum oxide which is harder than emery powder, and run the engine that way for a minute or 2. Won't that shine up the shaft real nice?
  8. Sorry, did some research and it doesn't fit 1922.
  9. I have one that's intertwined with an intake manifold and still attached to the engine. Where are you located? The master parts list says your exhaust manifold is for H-K-1921-1922-1923 6 cylinder. Mine is from an E 6 cylinder The master parts list also says mine fits a D-44-45-46-47 and E 6 cylinder. I find that extremely hard to believe. The D had a light 6 and was a totally different engine, the E was the 242 engine and should be the same as H-K-1921-1922-1923 6 cylinder. Must be a typo in the parts list.
  10. No way. About as useful as a ham radio that sends morse code.
  11. Still a few. I inherited (took) my father's CB radio when he died in 2016. Tried it and there was the occasional joker out there.
  12. It's from the 1930's. Elmer's casein glue: .
  13. . Casein glue came along in the 1930's, made by Borden's milk company about 6 miles from me. In the Civil War, Gail Borden invented canned condensed milk and set up a factory in Brewster, NY. They marketed the stuff with a cow named Elsie. Union soldiers won the war because they drank condensed milk. Then Borden's found out that milk/cheese protein made a strong glue, created the character Elmer, the husband of Elsie, because the glue was strong as a bull. Everybody started using it and calling it "white glue" and Borden's selling tons of it, then during WWII when somebody invented PVA (poly-vinyl-acetate), which is much stronger than casein glue, but is white, they sold the technology to Borden's who changed the formula of their "white glue" to PVA but kept Elmer as the mascot. The rest is history.