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4 hours ago, Jim Bollman said:

Yet another way to get that stuck bolt loose. I think I would have used a box end instead of the crescent for safety reasons.

 

TakeCover.jpg.c30db9cdfad8b4539d0a43f85fa6acd4.jpg

 

 

That is wrong on SO many levels. Not the least of which is he is pulling at the wrong angle. Maximum pressure angle is slightly under 90 degrees from the wrench handle. ANY deviation off 90 degrees must pull/push the wrench onto the nut, NOT pull the wrench out from the nut.

 

By the way. While the facts I gave are accurate? I am making a joke myself. I rarely claim to have a sense of humor.

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7 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

 

That is wrong on SO many levels. Not the least of which is he is pulling at the wrong angle. Maximum pressure angle is slightly under 90 degrees from the wrench handle. ANY deviation off 90 degrees must pull/push the wrench onto the nut, NOT pull the wrench out from the nut.

 

By the way. While the facts I gave are accurate? I am making a joke myself. I rarely claim to have a sense of humor.

 

 

IeTxKeXBc8zEXxRi-JK_TiubEBhs-RskzeH31lIHESQ.jpg

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On 11/16/2020 at 12:23 PM, Jim Bollman said:

Yet another way to get that stuck bolt loose. I think I would have used a box end instead of the crescent for safety reasons.

 

TakeCover.jpg.c30db9cdfad8b4539d0a43f85fa6acd4.jpg

 

 

The worst part of this is having the crescent wrench on the wrong way round for an 'undo'. If nothing else, the moving jaw will be stretched. Apologies for pointing out the bleeding onvious.

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On 11/16/2020 at 10:05 PM, Bush Mechanic said:
On 11/15/2020 at 8:23 PM, Jim Bollman said:

 

 

The worst part of this is having the crescent wrench on the wrong way round for an 'undo'. If nothing else, the moving jaw will be stretched. Apologies for pointing out the bleeding onvious.

Unless that is a left hand bolt, the adjustable wrench is on the correct way to loosen the bolt. See:

 

https://www.apexinds.com/blog/best-way-use-crescent-wrench/

 

Crescent brand wrenches even come with arrows on them to show direction to turn them properly.

 

Crescent Adjustable.jpg

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2 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

Unless that is a left hand bolt, the adjustable wrench is on the correct way to loosen the bolt. See:

 

https://www.apexinds.com/blog/best-way-use-crescent-wrench/

 

Crescent brand wrenches even come with arrows on them to show direction to turn them properly.

 

Crescent Adjustable.jpg

 

 

Thanks for that, Frank. I stand corrected and learn something new every day. The link didn't explain why they are used that way around. My logic and experience has always been that the point of least leverage on the moving jaw is at the base. And down under, we don't have arrows on our 'shifters'. Incidently, they have become antique curios around here since I discovered Nippex 'parallel jaws'.

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The reason is actually very simple. Because I cannot draw and post such pictures very well, let us see if I can explain it.

The weak area in the crescent type wrench is that area where the spiral thumb wheel is mounted inside the handle. The cut and machined area between the thumb wheel and the jaw is the absolute weakest link in the design. A little tough to visualize, however if the wrench is used the wrong direction? The jaw applies pressure to spread that machined and thin area. Spreading that area will much more easily cause it to break than compressing the area does. Using the wrench the right way, leverages the pressure to press the back of the jaw into the heal of the wrench, reducing the pressure to spread the thin area by a considerable amount. In that way, the wrench is much less likely to break.

 

My dad drilled that into me when I was young.

Many years ago, I had the experience to prove beyond any doubt about this. I found a nice (?) twelve inch genuine Crescent Wrench, buried in the dirt at a work site. Nobody claimed it, so it became mine. It obviously had not been there very long, the rust was minimal, and nothing was stuck. However, upon close inspection I noticed that it was already broken in the way they can and do often break if used the wrong direction. But such a good wrench was still a nice find. So I kept it and used it for quite a few years. Now, I wasn't usually opposed to carefully using a crescent type wrench the wrong way from time to time, so long as the pressure was light enough. However, this wrench, I never used the wrong way. Oh, I used it HARD! I often used it to change trailer hitch balls, sometimes as much strength as I could muster on it. But always the right direction.

I usually kept it aside so that I would be the only one using it, and it served me well for a number of years. Then one day, a coworker grabbed it when I wasn't looking, and went to use it on a medium size bolt. I looked over as he went to give it a push, just in time to see it break under light duty. The coworker was upset, apologized profusely, and said he would buy me a new one. I explained that it wasn't really his fault because it had already been broken and all was okay. It was a lesson, the direction really does matter.

 

An ironic twist that causes a LOT of confusion for a lot of people. The crescent type wrench has a preferred direction due to an odd angle direction effect in the weakest part of the wrench. It just happens to be the reverse of what is the proper direction of rotation for a common angle handle open end wrench, angle relative between the open jaws and the handle. 

It has to do with the optimum leverage angle I previously alluded to pulling onto the nut (or shaft) as opposed to pulling off the nut or shaft. It changes the dynamics of the leverage and torque. For a non-adjustable open end wrench, pulling the handle should help seat the jaws of the wrench for maximum torque and efficiency. It just happens that the weak spot in a crescent type wrench negates that advantage.

 

This "optimum leverage angle" also becomes very important to understand when adjusting mechanical brakes. However that would be another level of thread drift.

My apologies for drifting this much.

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Wayne, thanks for that explanation. How silly do I feel? Interestingly the Cresent brand wrench I have here dosn't have the arrow, either. I've never seen an arrow on one. Or seen one break, (although stretched jaws are not uncommon). Now I'll have to over-ride my instincts if using one. Old dogs and new tricks, eh.

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We call it a Crescent wrench but I once found an old Craftsman adjustable end wrench laying in the bilge while pulling the engine out of an old boat I was working on and and it was rusted up SOLID. It was one of the big ones.

Sears gave me a brand new one no questions. I still use it after these 40 years or so.

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7 hours ago, Bush Mechanic said:

Wayne, thanks for that explanation. How silly do I feel? Interestingly the Cresent brand wrench I have here dosn't have the arrow, either. I've never seen an arrow on one. Or seen one break, (although stretched jaws are not uncommon). Now I'll have to over-ride my instincts if using one. Old dogs and new tricks, eh.

I was a bush mechanic for a long time. Now I only maintain ones that are clean shaven. :)

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4 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

The arrows began about 10 years ago. Why, after over 100 years of production, I do not know!

Probably because of the "dumbing down of todays youth". Most don't even have enough common sense to raise the hood on a car much less knowing what to look for under there !

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That's not a "Crescent Wrench", it is a Universal Metric Wrench! We would say back in the 70s.😁

 

I bought the Harbor Freight large, bigger than 2", 3/4" drive socket sets both in Inch and Metric. Amazing how many times I need a socket larger than 1 1/2".😉

Of course they also work good on the hydraulic press for bushings/bearings/seals. I do not see them listed anymore.

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I actually have an adjustable crescent type wrench that is marked as 200mm. I have a nice selection of adjustable wrenches but almost never use them on a nut or bolt. I believe in using real wrenches when possible. Probably should say what we use to call them back in the day, not politically correct these days.

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15 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

batman-farmer.thumb.jpg.03248cfcc1441b3fe6d2c71bdf554003.jpg

You might think that tractor is a joke but its actually made this way to prevent soil compaction, and you wont have dirt being packed by 2 wheels just one. 

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On 11/15/2020 at 9:08 PM, gossp said:


that guy has “no regerts” printed on his other arm. 

Ha, I saw this post last week and thought to myself "what kind of dumbass would get this tattoo".  Today, I actually looked at the picture and now I'm like how did I miss this ?  It's funnier the more you look at it.

Edited by Morgansdad
spelling (see edit history)
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