Gary W

1937 Buick Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

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Gary,

 

I am having a heck of a time finding the correct oil for my 36 Plymouth transmission.  I had my buddy (who owns a transmission shop) go through it.  Bearings were fine, but the synchro hub was worn out. I got a nos hub and he re sealed the transmission.  Believe me, Chrysler Corp's transmission design, along with linkages and emergency brake hub is a departure from the simplicity of GM and Ford.  Chrysler designed the synchros as a "hub" not using individual rings.  As you may know, synchros are basically a "brake" which slows the gear so that it may mesh with the next gear during the gear change.  The new oils are no where near as thick as what was specked in the thirties.  When I shift, I have to allow the engine to drop in rpms and "gingerly" shift" so that I don't get the grinding of the gears.  And forget downshifting.  I have to do that at a stop. 

 

One of the Plymouth owners on my request said that you had used a specific product in your transmission.  I went back to your description of what you did to your transmission.  Other than painting it, there was no mention of the gear oil that you used.  I am trying to find the heaviest oil (preferably 140 wt.) as So Cal never goes below 55 to 60 degrees (in the winter during the day)  with most weather in the mid 70's to 80's.  In the summer, we do get up in the 90's for short spells, hence the need for a heavy oil.  

 

The problem is that my local auto parts store only has 90 weight oil (straight viscosity) and it is ( as I was told) compatible with  brass/bronze components in the transmission.  But one of the guys on the Plymouth site told me that 90 weight oil in today's oils is not the same as what was produced back in the thirties. 

 

Can you or any of your peers let me know if they have a specific product that they can recommend for my transmission?  Most of the transmissions back in the thirties used the same oils, which are non existent out here at my local supply houses.  If I get the proper brand, I may be able to order it on line from a supplier back there.

 

Your help will be appreciated.

 

Respectfully,

 

Randy                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        

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Friday January 19, 2018:  Inside of Trunk Lid painted

 

 

I stopped by the shop on my way home today.  The inside of the trunk lid is painted and the outside is sanded nice and smooth.

Bob will allow the inside to cure fully before flipping it over to paint the outside.  We are shooting for Wednesday install.

 

 

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Inside of the trunk all painted.

 

 

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Here you can see how smooth the outer side is, all ready for paint.

 

 

Have a great weekend!

Gary

 

 

 

 

(*** Randy....  Transmission Oil was discussed in June, 2017:  Page 12,  Post #300;    Page 13,  Posts 301,2,3,8,9,11,12,13,14 & 322,   and  Page 14,  Posts 333 & 334)

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11 hours ago, Randiego said:

Gary,

 

I am having a heck of a time finding the correct oil for my 36 Plymouth transmission.  I had my buddy (who owns a transmission shop) go through it.  Bearings were fine, but the synchro hub was worn out. I got a nos hub and he re sealed the transmission.  Believe me, Chrysler Corp's transmission design, along with linkages and emergency brake hub is a departure from the simplicity of GM and Ford.  Chrysler designed the synchros as a "hub" not using individual rings.  As you may know, synchros are basically a "brake" which slows the gear so that it may mesh with the next gear during the gear change.  The new oils are no where near as thick as what was specked in the thirties.  When I shift, I have to allow the engine to drop in rpms and "gingerly" shift" so that I don't get the grinding of the gears.  And forget downshifting.  I have to do that at a stop. 

 

One of the Plymouth owners on my request said that you had used a specific product in your transmission.  I went back to your description of what you did to your transmission.  Other than painting it, there was no mention of the gear oil that you used.  I am trying to find the heaviest oil (preferably 140 wt.) as So Cal never goes below 55 to 60 degrees (in the winter during the day)  with most weather in the mid 70's to 80's.  In the summer, we do get up in the 90's for short spells, hence the need for a heavy oil.  

 

The problem is that my local auto parts store only has 90 weight oil (straight viscosity) and it is ( as I was told) compatible with  brass/bronze components in the transmission.  But one of the guys on the Plymouth site told me that 90 weight oil in today's oils is not the same as what was produced back in the thirties. 

 

Can you or any of your peers let me know if they have a specific product that they can recommend for my transmission?  Most of the transmissions back in the thirties used the same oils, which are non existent out here at my local supply houses.  If I get the proper brand, I may be able to order it on line from a supplier back there.

 

Your help will be appreciated.

 

Respectfully,

 

Randy                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        

Randy:

 

As I am sure people on here will tell you, you want GL-1 or GL-4 (EP) oil for the trans. GL-5 will eat up what's left of your syncros.

 

Sta-Lube, a CRC product usually available at NAPA is available in a 140 weight GL-4.

 

Cheers, Dave

 

Edit: Spinney says there are exceptions. Fine, do the research yourself and decide what's best for you. I base my opinion on Widman: http://www.widman.biz/uploads/Transaxle_oil.pdf

But you are free to do whatever, it's your car. If further discussion is warranted, perhaps this should be moved to another thread and we can let Gary get back to his project!

 

Cheers again, Dave

Edited by Daves1940Buick56S (see edit history)

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My local O'Reilly's has a Masterpro GL4 140 wt gear oil available on the shelf for under $20 per gallon. I used that in my 1937 Buick Century. It solved my problem when I tried to use a 90 weight oil. 

 

https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/masterpro-chemicals-4341/chemicals---fluids-16461/grease---lube-16582/gear-oil---additives-16905/gear-oil---140w-20063/masterpro-chemicals-gear-oil/80040/4495693

 

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This may sound stupid, but  I was afraid to start cutting the rug to fit the floor properly.  Being the mat was already pre-cut (somewhat) and had the jute backing, I simply fine-tuned the rubber mat to my car and then used it as a template to cut the rug.  It is already formed to the transmission tunnel, the pedals, door sills and the seat and it adds a little more sound deadening under the carpet.  (Looking back, I would have ruined my carpet if I followed the markings that the manufacturer drew on the underside). But I guess as long as you can fabricate a good template, you can cut the Dynamat and your carpet.  Also, I figured if I'm ever at a show, and the car is supposed to have the mat up front (not carpet), I can remove the carpet for judging and have the Buick black mat on the floor.  

 

(I did use dynamat on the entire floor of the car, the self-adhesive sections.  The thick Dynaliner sticks directly to the Dynamat, and the size fits the rear section almost perfectly right out of the box.  Very little trimming and waste to get the rear section done.  It's a very easy product to use, but for me, using the mat up front as a template/ carpet base was just safer)

 

Hope it helps!  

 

 

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Saturday January 20, 2018:  Finalized wiring to the Trippe Lamps

 

Tonight I finished running the wires out to the fog lights.  I also ran a dedicated ground to each lamp and it makes a ton of difference in the lamp brightness.   

I think because the bumper support irons are powder coated, there isn't a great electrical ground.

 

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Just looks so cool in the dark garage.

 

 

Have a great night!

Gary

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On 1/13/2018 at 9:50 PM, Gary W said:

Saturday January 13, 2018:  Installation of the Hood

 

 

This morning Bob came over with his son and a couple friends and the five of us lifted the hood into position.  Once the "muscle" was done, Bob stayed for another hour with me to start making the adjustments.

I think we have it about 90%, but it still needs some fine tuning. 

 

 

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I was getting set up, covering the fenders and making some preliminary measurements.

 

 

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I placed towels over the front and cowl just in case it slipped.

 

 

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We actually had five guys here.  One on each corner and Bob at the front.  Here we are with the first lift getting the hood up and over the front clip.

 

 

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With five guys, it was much easier getting it lined up before dropping the bolts into the holes.

 

 

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Everyone was watching their corner as we slowly dropped it down.

 

 

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Here I was setting the rear hold-down bolt down into the cowl mounting hole.  I used one flat washer here so the sheet metal was at the same level as the cowl.

 

 

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And slowing closing the sides down.  

 

 

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Once that part was done, the gang left and Bob and I started making some adjustments.

First thing was to tighten down the forward and rear hold down nuts.

 

 

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The hood prop will hold both sides of the hood up so we can tighten up the rods.

 

 

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Bob stayed an extra hour with me, and we got it really close, but it still needs some finessing.

 

 

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I would like to close the rear gap a little. 

 

 

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Here's a side view.  It looks pretty good so far.  Like always, I set in place, made a few minor adjustments and will get to it tomorrow with fresh eyes.

 

 

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The biggest problem is the very front.  From this angle it looks OK.  But....

 

 

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You can see up front, there is a 1/16" - 1/8" gap on the passenger's side, and 1/4" on the driver's side.

 

 

DSC_0011.thumb.jpg.83e10675ee4c39dd2a217c517e222c77.jpg

I have all the clip bolts loose, the large nut at the bottom is almost out and the outer fender bolts are loose.

I wish there was some way to just shove that clip over 1/8", but I don't know how.

Also, the lower bolt is supposed to slide "fore and aft" but how, exactly does one accomplish that?  It's buried up inside the front crossmember.

Do you think this discrepancy can be remedied by adjusting the rods under the hood?

 

 

DSC_7257.thumb.jpg.fc1d5bca5f3a2eec1ce3db17bd1fb6e8.jpg

So anyway, here it is all buttoned up.  Looks sharp!

 

 

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A better angle of the hood in position.

 

 

 

 

Have a great night!

Gary

 

Gary, can you spare just a couple of those guys? You’re killing me over here! LOL some extra hands and fingers would sure come in handy with my wood spoke wheels and painting all the details in my hubcaps. My hands and fingers don’t even want to open up after all the sanding I’ve been doing.

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Tuesday January 23, 2018:  Paint Shop Update on the Trunk Lid

 

Last Friday the inner aspect of the trunk lid was painted and allowed to cure all weekend.

I was able to stop by the shop Monday and Tuesday (Today) to catch Bob finishing the outer skin of trunk lid.  

I'll get it home after work tonight and start assembling all the "trunk goodies" prior to installation.

 

 

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Monday morning. Flipped to show the outer panel.

 

 

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Close-up of the hinge holes.

 

 

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Ready for it's final sanding and wipe down before paint / clear.

 

 

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I stopped by the shop Monday afternoon, the base / clear is applied.

 

 

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Another view.  Ready for the wet sanding.....

 

 

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This morning Bob was starting the wet sanding.

 

 

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After the squeegee to find any imperfections that require more sanding.

 

 

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And this is how I left it this morning at around 10:00 am.  Once this is wet sanded, it gets machine compounded.

 

 

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I don't care how many times I see it......  it's just hard to look at!!!

 

 

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Meanwhile at home, I finished making all my dedicated ground wires.  I made a total of 10.  One for each forward lamp (6), one for each tail lamp (3), Sending unit.

 

 

Have a great night!

Gary

 

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Tuesday Evening, January 23, 2018:  Installation of the Trunk Lid

 

Tuesday is my late evening at the office so I didn't get home until 7:30.  I took a quick run to Bob's shop to pick up my trunk lid.  

After covering the kitchen counter with a heavy work blanket, I started installing all the "trunk goodies".

It didn't take long, and my boys helped me walk it out to the garage and install it onto the car.....

 

 

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7:30 at the shop.  Buffed out and ready to go.

 

 

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And in the kitchen waiting for the "goodies" to get installed.

 

 

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I've been working on all the trunk parts and had everything stored in one bin.  I had to rebuild the lock cylinder, as it was completely dismantled for chrome.

 

 

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Step one was to install the locking mechanism.

 

 

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A few pages back I finished all these parts in "trim black" and cut new gaskets.

 

 

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Both sides finished and operates nice and easy.

 

 

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Install the rubber backing onto the rear lamp / license plate holder.

 

 

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Set it into the four holes.  I like to go all around to be sure the rubber bead is nice and even all around.

 

 

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Four 7/16" nuts to hold in in position.

 

 

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License plate holder.  This is the part that slides to accommodate different size plates.  That spacer washer is key so the metal doesn't hit the trunk lid.

 

 

DSC_0583.thumb.jpg.254860028eb17aca8ecc85bd57a4504d.jpg

Slide that spacer under the license plate bracket and it will set into the locater depression made for it.

Then run the carriage bolt through the sliding bar, through the spacer and another 7/16" nut secures it tight.

 

 

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The last photo of the rear of the car wide open.

 

 

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Kyle gave me a hand holding and positioning the trunk lid, while Matthew was ready to push the hinges into their holes.

 

 

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With the three of us, we got it right into place.

 

 

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While the boys pushed down on the hinges, I was busy inside the trunk tightening up the hinge screws.

 I only tightened them enough to hold the lid, but allow some wiggle room. Then I went outside the car and got the gaps even all around the perimeter of the trunk.

Once satisfied the gaps were all consistent, I turned the handle and locked the trunk lid right in that position.

Then went back inside the trunk and tightened down the hinge mounting screws.

 

 

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While I was inside the trunk, I figured I should attach the support arm.

 

 

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It lined up real nice and was fairly simple to get installed.

 

 

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Next, I ran the wire up to the license lamp / trunk lamp socket.

 

 

DSC_0644.thumb.jpg.c45738552a27204b2dd981e7a876ce09.jpg

Tested the operation of the hinges, the alignment, the locking mechanism.....  All Good!

 

 

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And then installed my Brand New NJDMV Historic Plates!  Very cool.

 

 

DSC_0661.thumb.jpg.df50a5f316198e097da6d891269bf523.jpg

Checked the lights.....  all good!

 

 

DSC_0659.thumb.jpg.800f046259cf567c4d505451ea4d4925.jpg

And another big one done!

 

 

The only thing I have to do is install the chrome handle ferrule.  I know I ordered three new chrome ones, but for the life of me, I have NO IDEA where they are.

I even bought the ferrule seating tool to do the job right.  So I just have the handle sitting there for now.  If I can't find the ferrules tomorrow, I'll order new ones.

Then it's painting the black recesses next to the work Buick, and touching up the word BUICK with chrome paint.

 

A good day!

 

Gary
 

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
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Details...details...details. But the end result makes it all worth it. Looks great!

 

I have a question about something showing in your photo #19, the one with the caption below it that states "Tested the operation of the hinges, the alignment, the locking mechanism..." Inside the trunk, and on the shelf, are those two period-correct traveling suitcases that you were able to find and restore? Or did they come with the car originally? If they are restored who did the work?

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My wife found those at Home Goods!  (Part of the Marshall's discount store)  She bought them to use as decoration in my sons room.   I really liked them in the trunk so.......  One for the good guys!

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On 1/23/2018 at 12:53 PM, Gary W said:

 

 

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Meanwhile at home, I finished making all my dedicated ground wires.  I made a total of 10.  One for each forward lamp (6), one for each tail lamp (3), Sending unit.

 

 

Gary, I understand the need for a separate ground wire for the gas tank sending unit, but can you explain about the necessity for ground wires to the lights?  Also, where are you attaching the ground wires to get a good ground?  The body?  The frame?  Thanks.

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Hi Neil

I had my front fender irons and all four bumper irons powder coated.  The powder coat tends to insulate and I didn't want to grind any of it off.  The instructions included with the new UVIRA coated reflectors for the headlamps said for best results to run a dedicated ground directly to the headlamp socket.  So I did.  The lamps look great.  When I installed the Trippe lamps, only one lit up.  So I touched a wrench from the light shell to the bumper (basically grounding it) and it lit up.   Just for fun, I did the same thing to the side that was lit, and it glowed BRIGHTER!  So I just made a decision to run a dedicated ground to each lamp.

I ran the ground wires to the fender mounting bolts.   (The sending unit ground is about 20 feet long and comes off the battery, clipped to the frame out of sight)

 

 

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Driver's side Tail Lamp.  The short wire from the tail lamp mounting bolt over to the fender bolt.

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)

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Friday January 26, 2017:  Begin metal work on the Passenger's Side Door

 

I stopped by Bob's shop just at the right time Friday after work to watch him create and MIG weld in the lower door patch panels.  

As most of you know, the bottom of the doors are especially prone to rust, and I had three bad spots that required the metal cut out and patch panels made.

 

Here is the progress on the passenger's side:

 

 

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After sandblasting.  Not much plastic in the doors, just a little by the lower hinge and the lower corner on the handle side.

 

 

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But the lower edge had a few rust through areas.  The metal that was cut out is laying on top of the door skin.

 

 

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Here's the rotted metal that was removed from the rear drain hole area.

 

 

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The patch is welded in position.

 

 

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There is the large area dead center that was left to do when I arrived.

 

 

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Using the metal cut out as the template, a new piece of metal is cut out.

 

 

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Then it is formed.  Flattened out after the snips which tend to curl it, then he uses a steel bar to give it a longitudinal curve to match the door profile.

 

 

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Test fit a couple of times.

 

 

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Then after grinding all the paint off, and cleaning the patch panel (and the opening in the door), it is held firm by the magnet and ready for the first tack weld.

 

 

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Here's the machine.

 

 

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First couple welds.

 

 

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Little tweak to get the proper fit.

 

 

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And then finish the first round of welds.  He will weld it all around the perimeter before it is ground smooth.

 

 

 

Have a great weekend!

Gary

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Gary, the hood and trunk look awesome. And the lights illuminate the rear and front with that 30's charm.   Bob's a BRAVE Man.   No hood.  No gloves.  I know it is just being tacked but he must have very tough skin seasoned with many hot sparks flying from the gun.  A seasoned pro.  

 

I have just finished rotator cuff surgery on my right shoulder.  My surgeon pioneered the arthroscopic surgery here in San Diego. He is a very seasoned pro. Something about grey hair that gives the patient confidence.  Guess that is why they call it a Medical Practice.  Always practicing. HE did not need to "fillet" me open.  Just two little incisions, removed a large bone spur that was cutting into the bursa (causing me so much pain) and suturing up the torn rotator cuff ligaments.  When I came to and the pain meds wore off.......NO PAIN.  This guy is good.  (Like Bob  and you). The anesthesiologist used a block and that let me recover  quickly.   Look I am typing (albeit with a sling on my arm) one day after surgery ! ! !   NO Hydrocodone needed.  Modern medicine is great.  His restoration work needs to be posted here.  :-)

 

Now, when the brace is off my arm, I will change the oil in my transmission.  Couldn't find anyone with the Texaco product that you use in your cars, and I do not need 5 gallons  so I will use the Sta Lube 140.  Should be ok.  We will see and I will let you know how it works out.  

 

If they built the Buicks back in the day, like you are building yours, they would not need to be restored.  They would last for a hell of a long time in great shape.  A testament to your work.

 

Randy 

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Hi Gary,

an inspiration to us all in your methods and your attention to detail. I love the way you want to re-use as many of the original 1937 hardware and Fasteners by the simple clean and paint, rather than just buying new replacements, which never look the same.

 

Your charter to “do at least one thing everyday” is certainly on track and a great maxim to go by with any vehicle restoration.

 

Thank you for your posts, I will stop by here every now and then from the Riviera Owners forum.

cheers

Rodney from “down under” ?????

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14 hours ago, Gary W said:

Hi Neil

I had my front fender irons and all four bumper irons powder coated.  The powder coat tends to insulate and I didn't want to grind any of it off.  The instructions included with the new UVIRA coated reflectors for the headlamps said for best results to run a dedicated ground directly to the headlamp socket.  So I did.  The lamps look great.  When I installed the Trippe lamps, only one lit up.  So I touched a wrench from the light shell to the bumper (basically grounding it) and it lit up.   Just for fun, I did the same thing to the side that was lit, and it glowed BRIGHTER!  So I just made a decision to run a dedicated ground to each lamp.

I ran the ground wires to the fender mounting bolts.   (The sending unit ground is about 20 feet long and comes off the battery, clipped to the frame out of sight)

 

 

Thanks, Gary.

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On ‎1‎/‎20‎/‎2018 at 8:47 PM, Gary W said:

Saturday January 20, 2018:  Finalized wiring to the Trippe Lamps

 

Tonight I finished running the wires out to the fog lights.  I also ran a dedicated ground to each lamp and it makes a ton of difference in the lamp brightness.   

I think because the bumper support irons are powder coated, there isn't a great electrical ground.

 

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Just looks so cool in the dark garage.

 

 

Have a great night!

Gary

 

I don't know if you mentioned it or not, but are you using a conventional lead-acid battery or are you using one of the dry cell, OPTIMA batteries? A 6-volt system is all about current, or amps. And I think the OPTIMA dry cell battery has something like 40-50% more amperage than a 6-volt lead acid design.

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35 minutes ago, 1967 - 1997 Riviera said:

 

I don't know if you mentioned it or not, but are you using a conventional lead-acid battery or are you using one of the dry cell, OPTIMA batteries? A 6-volt system is all about current, or amps. And I think the OPTIMA dry cell battery has something like 40-50% more amperage than a 6-volt lead acid design.

 

Just my opinion on the optima batteries... I was using them in 2 old cars, and after many years of good service they both died without warning.  They didn't crank slowly, or need to be charged often... They just left me with no power when I needed it most. 

 

I switched back to conventional batteries for that reason. 

 

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Wednesday Morning, January 31, 2018:  Door Update

 

 

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The metal patch panels are welded in and fiber glass was used to make the contours.

 

 

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The outer door skin bottom is now ready for all the sanding, self etch.........  So it is left alone for now and we flipped the door over.

 

 

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Pulling out the door skin plastic clips.  You can see some of the nails still in the nail holes.  Those suckers really hold firm.

 

 

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Removing all the door weatherstripping.

 

 

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The wedge

 

 

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Dead center of the door bottom:  the seam was in pretty rough shape.

 

 

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Using a hammer and dolly,  Bob begins to reshape the area

 

 

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The area begins to take on its original shape once again

 

 

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After and ready for the self etch.

 

 

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After stirring, stirring and stirring all the solids from the bottom, it is strained into the gun.

 

 

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Two light coats

 

 

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And he'll flip it over in about an hour to complete the body work on the outside of the door.

 

 

Gary
 

 

 

 

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Been a while since popping in last.  She is looking fantastic.   Love the head lamps with the additional lights on the nose.   

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