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1937 Buick Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)


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Nice job, Gary!  Just like old times being able to come onto the forum and be treated to one of your excellent presentations.  I have the same system on my '41, installed by a previous owner, but not nearly as elegantly as you have done yours.  But when I put a new wiring harness in, I concealed the fuel pump wiring in "old school" wiring loom the way you did.  It works just as you describe -- hit the switch and wait until the sound of the pump fades out and you're good to go.

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9 hours ago, 1937McBuick said:

Is there a reason you chose electric primer over a check valve?   

Just curious.

 

The way I understand today's modern fuels is that they are more volatile and actually evaporate faster.  I hope I have that correct.

So, it's not so much that the carburetor is draining out, (which, I'm sure it is), but the fuel in the bowl is actually evaporating.

 

This little pump fills the system quickly and  I'm not running the starter excessively.  

 

All I can be certain of is that now it takes anywhere from 15 seconds to maybe 45 seconds depending on the length of time she sat idle and we're off.

 

Thanks for following along...  great to be back on here adding to the story!

 

Gary

 

 

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2 hours ago, Gary W said:

 

The way I understand today's modern fuels is that they are more volatile and actually evaporate faster.  I hope I have that correct.

So, it's not so much that the carburetor is draining out, (which, I'm sure it is), but the fuel in the bowl is actually evaporating.

 

This little pump fills the system quickly and  I'm not running the starter excessively. 

 

This is correct. A lot of people seem to believe that gas is somehow being sucked out of the carburetor and back into the tank, but it's actually evaporation. If it was merely a siphoning action, it would happen quickly upon shut-down not slowly over the course of a week. A check valve alone probably won't help and the volume of fuel that may (or may not) remain in the line between the check valve and the carburetor wouldn't be enough to fill the bowl, never mind start the car. Until the bowl(s) are nearly full, no gas is going into the venturis, and that means no start. The electric pump is the correct solution. European cars have been using this solution since the '30s, so it's not new or questionable. It neatly solves a problem that wasn't as pronounced when these cars were driven daily using completely different fuels that didn't evaporate nearly as fast under conditions that didn't stress them as much.

 

GloomyCanineIntermediateegret-size_restr

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Gary - great work! I'm constantly impressed by your craftsmanship. Too bad Brillman didn't have the wire you needed, but the wrapped wires look great.

 

Matt, your gif game is squarely on point - I almost spit my coffee on my computer!

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Beautiful work Gary!

 

Your car is so awesome, I did not want to criticize, but I'm glad you moved the cut off master switch and hid it.  The engine compartment seemed perfect and the switch detracted from it, in my opinion.  And as you said, popping the hood to flip the switch every time can be a drag.

 

I added a similar electric pump to my garden tractor because in the winter when I use  it to clear snow after sitting for weeks at a time, the carb was dry.  I found that fuel would not flow freely through the pump, but I didn't try to push it through the original vacuum pulse pump either and then shut off the electric pump once the tractor started.  I just bypassed the pulse pump.  Now your experience makes me wonder if I could use it just to prime the pump and carb, then shut it off and see if the pulse pump will continue to draw through the electric non running pump.  I may try that.

 

My old Buicks have strictly electric pumps right to the carb and are used 100% of the time.  The pump fills the carb bowl in about 5 seconds, then I switch off the pump to prevent flooding and switch back on once started.  I wonder if yours takes longer to fill because you are pushing through your original fuel pump as well...?  I'm familiar with the change in pump sound when the priming is complete.

 

Your wiring skills are a match to your other restoration skills.  These updates are very motivational!  Thank you as always for sharing!

 

What is your next project that we can all look forward to following along with?

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  • 5 weeks later...

Hi Gary,

 

Another detailed photographic tour de force. Would you mind letting me know where you sourced your cloth wiring wrap please. 

 

I agree with 27donb, can't wait for your next project, having withdrawals since you completed the '37

 

Cheers

 

Paul

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Hi Paul! 

So nice hearing from you again.

 

The wrap I used is from Restoration Supply Co.  It's called "Linen Cord".  It is a nice waxed cord that stays put and when done, you use their "Q-Dope" to secure it.

 

 

758209030_ScreenShot2020-09-11at11_04_17PM.thumb.png.7d1c9cc8ab59e16d742a312e5d785630.png

 

 

I used the Black, part # ELE098.

 

Gary

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