Gary W

1937 Buick Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

Recommended Posts

Gary, I think I might replace the fender welting on our car. The original welting is still on the car and the fenders have never been off but the welting is worn badly. I might be able to use the original welting as a pattern, what do you think? Where did you get the welting from? Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DSC_3891.thumb.JPG.d2a2da825d9731fdc3d02445b5c79e6a.JPG

 

 

 

1 hour ago, Gary W said:

My wife and I were running out to an 80th birthday party, but she still had to get ready so I grabbed my boys and the three of us got the driver's side set in position.

 

 

This is my favorite of all!  Wife: "Gary, what the heck are you doing?  We have to be at the party in 10 minutes!"  Gary (dressed in his tux and immaculate dress shoes), "Just a minute, darling, I'm just putting a fender on the Buick!"  :P:D

  • Like 6
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, LAS VEGAS DAVE said:

Gary, I think I might replace the fender welting on our car. The original welting is still on the car and the fenders have never been off but the welting is worn badly. I might be able to use the original welting as a pattern, what do you think? Where did you get the welting from? Dave

 

Hi Dave

I used the 1/4" welting from Steele Products.  They have a 3/16" as well.  It's a big car, I liked the larger one.  I'm sure someone will let you know the right size.  You can certainly use your original as a pattern.

 

5a251bf899071_ScreenShot2017-12-04at4_56_23AM.thumb.png.e6c7c7bc970c7aa854b00c3fa0c949a7.thumb.png.795bad04a656b516cfe3110aa629cfef.png

This is the fender welt I used.

 

 

5a251c73ef005_ScreenShot2017-12-04at4_58_53AM.thumb.png.c986c67e294f688ee2e5fbeb8130ba67.png.431e77bd8a6033c05046a705ef93cb59.png

This double-backed tape is so helpful when installing the welt.  Holds it nice and firm while you draw down the bolts.

 

Gary

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, neil morse said:

DSC_3891.thumb.JPG.d2a2da825d9731fdc3d02445b5c79e6a.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

This is my favorite of all!  Wife: "Gary, what the heck are you doing?  We have to be at the party in 10 minutes!"  Gary (dressed in his tux and immaculate dress shoes), "Just a minute, darling, I'm just putting a fender on the Buick!"  :P:D

Someone needs to edit this pic to make it black and white and worn with the caption "1930's chauffeur driver helping his client's children repair a Buick" 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:P -- that's great!  It even looks like he's wearing white gloves in the B&W version.  Gary, that should go on your wall!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary,

 

I had a glitch with my password and could not get back on to AACA Forum till now.  I talked to my plating company regarding painting over fresh (or any) chrome.  He told me that to get paint to stick to the chrome, use a 3 M green pad and scuff the chrome to give it "tooth" for the paint to adhere properly.  Painting over un scuffed chrome is "iffy" as to how long and how you care for the item.  Even "detail mister" can "lift" the paint over time, but it may be many years before a problem arises.  I have a 73 Fiat Spider that I am restoring (complete) and the windshield frame has a "satin" finish on the top surface (where the folding top meets the frame).  When I got it back from the plater, I asked him about the shiny surface.  Originally (from the factory), one of the steps was to do a light sand blast on the top surface to give it the satin finish.  My plater told me that using the green 3M pad will accomplish the same results. Drag it lightly in ONE DIRECTION ONLY.  I did so and  now the inside of the windshield frame is "satin".   Oh, I have to finish the Fiat before I can resume work on the 36 Pontiac.   :-(      I was doing the Fiat when the opportunity to get the Pontiac arose and so now I have two to restore.   

 

On the 36 Pontiac Coupe, I have two bumpers that require two black paint lines the full length of the bumpers.  The plater told me to take the green 3 M pad, cut it into strips and use a wood dowel cut to the width of the "slot" and use that to apply pressure to the 3M pad strips to get the inside of the grove properly scuffed to accept the paint.  It may be too late for you as I am sure that most of your chrome is already painted but for future work, the 3M green is the solution.

 

I am sure that during the holiday, work will slow down on the Buick, but we are patient.  I so much enjoy reading your thread and following the progress.  I was especially impressed with your work on the headliner ! ! !   That was as good as a professional upholstery shop, and you are doing this for the first time?  As all of your work, you are going into uncharted waters on many of the items that you restored.  Gary,  this goes to show  that using common sense, research, trial and error, (AND LOST OF TALENT) most items are not out of reach for the restorer.  

 

I will apply many steps in your restoration to my Pontiac and the Plymouth (when I pull the trigger to do that one too) restorations.  Your detail of the fender welting installation was superb.  Welting 101.  A complete course!   We are waiting to see you do your seats.  Will you re do the coil burlap covers?  I am sure that the mice urine really made a mess of most of the materials but still, there may be some that were able to be saved.  

 

I really like your diligence and perseverance.  Dressed to the nines before you attended a party and having your sons help you hanging the fenders just goes to show us that time is not wasted in your household.  If you have a waking moment, your mind is thinking of the Buick.  This is why, one year later, the car is almost finished.  WOW !  

 

We eagerly await your next post.

 

Randy 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Randiego said:

 He told me that to get paint to stick to the chrome, use a 3 M green pad and scuff the chrome to give it "tooth" for the paint to adhere properly.  Painting over un scuffed chrome is "iffy" as to how long and how you care for the item.  Even "detail mister" can "lift" the paint over time, but it may be many years before a problem arises. 

 

This is how I painted my factory chrome bumpers on my old truck-daily driver.  The front bumper lasted about 2 years before it started peeling.  I thought that was pretty good for a green pad scuff and some Wal-Mart self-etching paint as prep.

 

On a car that is comparatively rarely driven, I imagine it would last much longer (my rear bumper never peeled in the 4 years I had it after that).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My '36 model 48 has 16" rims. To get the new tire / rim combo to work, we had to drop back to a 15" rim. Unfortunately the hub caps I ordered from Bob's Automobilia don't fit these modern rims..  Any idea son something that will work? We have even contemplated taking old and new cut and reweld...

Or does anyone have an idea of where I could get some custom '36 Buick hubcaps made in the 36 design?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, pplaut said:

My '36 model 48 has 16" rims. To get the new tire / rim combo to work, we had to drop back to a 15" rim.

 

My '37 has 16" rims also.  ( I thought all the models had 16" rims except the Century with 15" rims? )  My new tires are  6.50 - 16  Firestone bias ply.  The tubes and tires fit right on the rims.  

Maybe I'm not understanding exactly what you had to do to get the tire / rim combo "to work"?

I would love to see a photo of your Model 48!

 

DSC_0664.thumb.jpg.2b81386392e23ee70b6d37a129589ab1.jpg.27968100a700768c69209524bd5ea1cf.jpg

Here's my '37 Hubcap.  Re-chromed and the detail is a laser-cut decal

 

 

DSC_0671.thumb.jpg.2ab6cdba4e5b8249020275f414b1e3be.jpg.5f16dae09aad525dd90ee2b6a7814e62.jpg

Installed.  

 

Gary

 

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sunday December 10, 2017:  Fuel filler, gaskets, first time out of the garage on her own power...

 

I got a couple of small projects done today.  The big event was starting her up and driving out of the garage so I could organize and clean up.  Nice feeling her get up and go!

 

 

 

DSC_4308.thumb.jpg.ab91406a3d34953f2a2de0fd198c3032.jpg

Here's the lineup when installing the fuel filler neck.  I got a new fender grommet.  It cannot be used.  After getting everything lined up, there was no way that grommet would sit properly.

 

 

5a2e9ce60dd30_DSC_0539(1).thumb.JPG.b3e05b745519085f51fc9dc5318bd792.JPG

Flashback to January 2017.

 

 

5a2e9ce17f516_DSC_4318(1).thumb.JPG.6dbe235059dc2cfeffebee9f3705bd0a.JPG

Filler tube installed, the mud shield is powder coated "mirror black"

 

 

DSC_4310.thumb.jpg.28da46aadeb25c84f4ddec8a4e6078ad.jpg

Comparison photograph of the new repro on the left, the original grommet on the right.  Notice the original has a "crease" in the middle.

That "crease" or "dent" is absolutely necessary to get everything to fit.  The fender has a pronounced shape corresponding to that bend.

 

 

DSC_4371.thumb.jpg.63fa84bee86a2fdaf85212b5450bdb84.jpg

Here it is, nice and snug.  By the way, is this the correct cap?  I'm getting a little heat for the way it looks.  

 

 

DSC_4350.thumb.jpg.3e1a8be66f98274934be8055fad7e9b6.jpg

A few posts ago i cleaned, primed and painted the trunk mechanism.  Today I traced and cut the gaskets to ready it for installation.

 

 

DSC_4357.thumb.jpg.d448cac755760a8d3f03819eb56788f4.jpg

The punch makes the best holes and the job looks real professional.

 

 

DSC_4359.thumb.jpg.66f0e7223390b8c62055346111135454.jpg

Another project ready to go in.

 

 

DSC_4421.thumb.jpg.d8c996d37351f254286c5c5477ea28ed.jpg

Then, I couldn't take the mess in the garage anymore, so I decided to pull her out and make some room to clean.

Started her up, I sat on a plastic bin and got her some fresh air!  First time out on her own power in 11 months.

 

 

DSC_4422.thumb.jpg.e4aea408d91c35ede2cad6f7c60adf1c.jpg

Carefully watching so I didn't hit the door frame.

 

 

DSC_4436.thumb.jpg.7142e919bc03b032d417d4a2bd2781e3.jpg

The paint really "pops" when it's outdoors.

 

 

IMG_E7272.thumb.jpg.7f69b8fc5812ad60df4c49ff1ba4f2ba.jpg

11 months ago.

 

 

DSC_4428.thumb.jpg.9835f5dfb34c533219e20fed5df568ba.jpg

Today.  Coming along!

 

 

DSC_4441.thumb.jpg.3f34621f63c870424073dc59c2ade20a.jpg

And here's the mess I had to fix.  I wanted to get organized before the hood returns, the interior.....

 

 

DSC_4468.thumb.jpg.de334a8de55b9e288ab124e1bbb908ad.jpg

3 hours later.  I'm pooped!

 

 

Couple things on the first start up.

1.  The automatic choke appears to be operating.  When the car sat outside for three hours in the 32 degree air, the choke was closed off solid when I went out to start it.  I let it idle 15 minutes and when I went to drive it in, the choke was fully open.

2.  I notice the charge indicator is a little erratic.  If I juice it, and keep it at a high idle, it stays pretty stable on the charge side.  When she settles down to a normal idle, the needle kinda "clicks" up, then to middle, the pops up to charge.  Not a fluid motion, "clicky".

3.  Oil pressure is holding nicely at 40 pounds on start up,  15 minutes later at 30 - 35.  

4. I let it idle 15 minutes, and no overheating.  (Although it is freezing out).  Radiator was warmer up at the top tank, and noticeably less warm at the bottom.

5.  It was difficult to start after sitting outside the three hours.  I had to use starting fluid to get it to finally kick over.  Is it possible the fuel is running out of the carburetor when it sits?  This seems to be an issue for me.

All - in - all it was really nice to get behind the wheel again.  Although I need to bolt that crate down.  I step on the clutch, the crate tips back!  Worth every second!

 

Have a great evening!

Gary

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GARY, I doubt that the fuel is running out of the carb or that it evaporated in the cold weather. If it continues to give you a problem there is a brass plug on the side of the float bowel that is the correct level for the fuel in the float chamber. You could remove that easily and see if any trickles out. If it does not then I would remove the top 8 screws and lift off the top of the carb and see whats going on. If it is empty there is something wrong. I believe the 38 carb on mine is different from yours. Also I noticed that in 38 the gas filler is under a fender cover so you can't see the filler and it eliminated the rubber grommet in 1938. 1937 and 38 look similar at first but there are differences. The 37 and 38 were my favorite body styles. Your car looks more beautiful each week.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect that with just the heat from the warmed up engine, modern fuel will evaporate out of the carburetor upon shutdown and sitting for that period of time. I have an electric fuel pump near the gas tank that I use to prime the carburetor if the car has been sitting over an hour or so. It also solves any vapor lock problem in hot weather.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On #2, mine does that as well at idle. What RPM are you set to? If it's low enough the cutout may be engaging, which definitely will make the needle jump. I know you overhauled the elec system completely, but how was the voltage reg set up? Usually it is best to do the final adjustment while installed in the car.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our car can sit for a week or ten days and start instantly with the modern gas in the winter or spring or fall. If it is driven in 100 degree heat during the summer and then parked for an hour the gas will evaporate a little but still start pretty quickly without the use of the electric pump. If it is parked after driving in 100 degree heat and then parked in the garage during the summer for a week or two I need to use the electric pump to prime it. We drive it regularly and park it and it starts almost instantly when we get back in it. It did not do this until one day I put a fuel regulator on the carb. I had lots of carb problems until I put the regulator on it, since then it's a different car, I really don't know how the regulator made such a difference, but in my case it did.

 

Edited by LAS VEGAS DAVE (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't use starting fluid.... It can be extremely harmful to the engine. It it also very misunderstood. It apparenlty exists because typical gas in the 20s had so much kerosene in it that in cold weather it would not vaporize, at all.

 

LAS VEGAS DAVE and MCHinson are on the right track. Find out if the carburetor is truly getting empty. If it is, verify that you heat riser is working properly, and opening when the manifold gets hot.

 

What kind of check valves does the fuel pump have in it?  If they are the bakelite disc type, and they are brand new. they probably don't work yet. This can make it very slow to refill the carb at cranking speed. If they are elastomer type (replaced as an assembly) you can probably ignore this.

 

I believe these cars have a drain in the intake manifold to relieve flooding. There should be a ball bearing (or something) that sucks up and closes the drain when the engine starts. Is it there and does it work?

 

With the engine hot, and you think it probably isn't going to start, disable the starter (by disconnecting the battery or whatever) and look down the throat of the carb. Open the throttle and look for the accelerator pump to squirt. Make sure it does. If there is gas in the carb, it should squirt with any movement of the throttle.

 

Lastly, what kind of automatic choke do you have? Is it the original Delco type?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bloo,

The check you speak of is only on the bigger engines in '38.

 

Gary,

Congratulations. Great job and I understand your elation on being able to "drive"it. 

My charge indicator needle does the same thing when idling very slowly.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary :

 My charge indicator does jump a bit also. It does not bother me as I have not had a low battery condition since I brought it home September 2012 from the "Restoration Shop"?.

 Since we have the same Marvel carb and Delco choke set up The starting issues are similar. I did not start the car for a month in storage. I usually  remove the brass screw on the left facing side of the carb and with a squirt oil can of gasoline to prime it. It still take a bit of cranking when it has been sitting that long.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary, according to both clocks it took 3hr and 20 min to organize your garage.. Also your storage bin seat looks a little more stable than the 5gal bucket I`ve always used for a temporary seat..  Everything is "Looking Good"!!  Tom

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know nothing about these modern 37's and 38's...

 

But I will say on the 27's, with no voltage regulator, a generator and only a cutout relay, the ammeter can be jumpy around "0".  Low load at moderate road speed and the needle is a bit more steady at around 9 amps hot.  And with the 27 technology, that's what it charges regardless of battery voltage condition. 

 

Does the '37 have a voltage regulator, which would taper off the charge rate based in battery voltage condition?  And I assume it still uses a generator?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 27donb said:

Does the '37 have a voltage regulator, which would taper off the charge rate based in battery voltage condition?  And I assume it still uses a generator?

 

It has 1/2 the field running unregulated (for current) and the other half regulated by a non-adjustable third brush. The regulator contains a cutout and a voltage regulator. The generator is spun a little faster than a plain 3rd brush generator is.

 

This works better than you would imagine it could. It is good for about 25 amps, and will charge down a little lower in RPM than a plain third brush setup. Tapering off at higher rpm is minimized.

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Bloo said:

 

It has 1/2 the field running unregulated (for current) and the other half regulated by a non-adjustable third brush. The regulator contains a cutout and a voltage regulator. The generator is spun a little faster than a plain 3rd brush generator is.

 

This works better than you would imagine it could. It is good for about 25 amps, and will charge down a little lower in RPM than a plain third brush setup. Tapering off at higher rpm is minimized.

 

Interesting! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now