Gary W

1937 Buick Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

Recommended Posts

Gary:

 I know that in an old "Torque Tube " newsletter there was an article on modifying the trunk light to operate as an extra brake light. Changing the socket to a double filament and pig tailing off of a tail light. I never got around to it but I still want to do it.

 As an addendum to my wiring harness account to Dave. I chose the RI harness as to how it would look and function as original. The extra loom and wires they added for me to have turn signals cancelled that out.

Larry

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Larry!

 

When I dismantled the trunk lid, the previous owner actually ran a separate light bulb from the right rear brake light, draped the wires across the trunk and simply taped the bulb to the lens so it would shine when the brakes were applied.

I do like the idea, as drivers today are pretty much trained to look for the third brake light, and maybe I'll put that on my "to-do" list soon.  First I want to get all the wiring sorted out as it should be.  I think that conversion should be pretty easy.

 

Here's how I got the car:

 

DSC_0327.thumb.jpg.398e9ea555544e26889621229fe94b3f.jpg
 

Those two black wires draped across the trunk lit the "third brake light"

 

 

5a1985e5c248c_DSC_03332.thumb.JPG.c39ecfb38c1dc6574acc90eac6aa3408.JPG

It was simply wired to the right brake light, and electrical taped to the existing wires.

 

 

DSC_0740.thumb.jpg.a093e7742d5f6a2b4d6074315dd692bc.jpg

And taped to the license plate holder up top, just under the lens.

So it was a free standing bulb, not wired into the original socket.

 

Gary

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 1937-44 said:

 

Matt I've been wondering if the part number difference could just be do to Delco changing their numbering system?

 

Carl

 

 

I don't know where to look for a part number, but I think these are the two different switches?  

 

My "restored" Special switch is the shorter one.  I'm going to crack it open now to check on the internal connectors.

 

DSC_3286.thumb.jpg.abb0f0a5fb0216eddbcf7efac34d9304.jpg

 

 

 

DSC_3299.thumb.jpg.95bb1dbc7847b3f335e5e75ec0fcf89a.jpg

Internally, the difference I see is the center "triangle".  It is larger in the switch marked "C", while all the "triangles" up top are the same, smaller size.

Also, the brass connections in the base....  they are all the same size near the thermo circuit  area whereas there are some larger ones in the lower switch.

 

So, I don't know why my lights were on when the switch was in the "off" position, but maybe someone will figure it out.

 

G

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary, problems you`re having is the reason I`m updating to a later model headlight switch which will also control my dome light and the variable resistor for dash lights, but that`s just me, which some people don`t like..  Tom

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some comments:

 

1) Glad to see you are using Simichrome to polish the six stainless steel aerodynamic trim pieces. That is great stuff, and the least abrasive polish I've found.

 

2) The completed assembly shown in your last two pictures looks like the Martian's space ship in the 1950s sci-fi movie "The War of the Worlds."

 

3) I notice in one of your pictures that there are two filaments in the bulb. Could the extra filament be meant for additional light when you back-up? Or is it to provide additional illumination for the red lens when you apply the brake? If so, then that could solve your desire to have something akin a third brake light for additional safety. Would hate to see you rear-ended one day by someone who is distracted because they are texting while driving!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, 1937-44 said:

 

Matt I've been wondering if the part number difference could just be do to Delco changing their numbering system?

 

Carl

 

Carl,

According to the parts manual, all 1937 Buicks use the same switch and all 1938 Buicks use the same switch. The 1937 and 1938 have a different  headlight switch part number. Based on observing my 1938 Century and my 1937 Century headlight switches, I am fairly certain that the short switch is the 1937 switch, part number 480-W, and the long switch is the 1938 switch, part number 1994501.

 

Gary,

I have not opened up my 1937 switch, but I am guessing that the center contact should be the same wider style as the 1938 switch. It is hard to visualize where the contacts would fall,  but I think that the problem might be that the rebuilder should have used one of the wider center contacts in the rebuilt 1937 headlight switch. I think it has the wrong contact and that is what caused the headlights to be on when the switch was in the off position.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MCHinson said:

 

Gary,

I have not opened up my 1937 switch, but I am guessing that the center contact should be the same wider style as the 1938 switch. It is hard to visualize where the contacts would fall,  but I think that the problem might be that the rebuilder should have used one of the wider center contacts in the rebuilt 1937 headlight switch. I think it has the wrong contact and that is what caused the headlights to be on when the switch was in the off position.

 

We have multiple reasons to be grateful to Gary for creating this thread, but one of the lessons that we can take from his experience in this restoration is NEVER THROW ANYTHING AWAY when you are dismantling your original car!  I haven't been keeping a detailed score, but the headlight switch, I believe, is either the second or third item that he needed to resurrect because the "new" part that he purchased turned out to be defective in some way. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, neil morse said:

 

We have multiple reasons to be grateful to Gary for creating this thread, but one of the lessons that we can take from his experience in this restoration is NEVER THROW ANYTHING AWAY when you are dismantling your original car!  I haven't been keeping a detailed score, but the headlight switch, I believe, is either the second or third item that he needed to resurrect because the "new" part that he purchased turned out to be defective in some way. 

 

Amen!  A guy asked me the other day why I still have all the "broken" parts I've taken off my cars.  I told him it's because I've lost track of the number of times I've needed to resurrect one of them because the new/restored replacement didn't work.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, dibarlaw said:

Changing the socket to a double filament and pig tailing off of a tail light. I never got around to it but I still want to do it.

 As an addendum to my wiring harness account to Dave. I chose the RI harness as to how it would look and function as original. The extra loom and wires they added for me to have turn signals cancelled that out.

  Actually Larry the additional wires would make the job better as they would allow you to have turn signals and a third brake light.  I converted my trunk light to a stop light and running light by installing a double contact socket  and just adding a wire from the left brake light wire. Unfortunately you would have to splice into your new wiring harness though.

 My biggest challenge was the slant back doesn't have as much room for the larger bulb. My job is very crude but but I wasn't very concerned as nobody sees it unless they take apart the trunk light. Here are a couple pictures of my crude conversion.

 

Carl

DSCF0319.JPG

DSCF0320.JPG

DSCF0315.JPG

DSCF0318.JPG

DSCF0304.JPG

Edited by 1937-44
Difficulty adding pictures (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

37-1944:       About adding a brake light to the license plate light on the trunk lid   (  1937 Special in our case )    .........we did this successfully .   

 

We removed the single contact socket and replaced it with a double contact socket.      Then we used a 1154 double contact bulb.  Like you we found it was difficult to fit in a double contact bulb ......but.then we found 1154 bulbs with a smaller glass envelope....this solved the matter.

 

We also found that adding a third brake bulb caused too much much voltage drop ( the extra amps caused this ).  So we added a parallel wire from a terminal on the headlight switch hence to the stoplight switch hence to the brake wiring back near the rear bumper.   In hindsight...I think the brakelight switch we were using wasn't heavy duty enough and was the souce of much of the excessive voltage drop.

 

I'm sure glad we now have three stoplight bulbs in the rear.....the original set-up of two bulbs was too hard too see.and unsafe.

 

Jack Worstell     jlwmaster@aol.com

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Jack I haven't noticed any problems with my third brake light drawing to much voltage, however I still run old stock switches. Like you I get leery of the small tail lights on our cars. If I ever buy a new wiring harness I'm going to see if they can add an extra wire in the harness for the trunk brake light.

 

Carl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We drive a lot at night, at least once a week and sometime two or three times. We have bright halogen bulbs in the stock taillights but I am not thrilled with just two little lights even if they are bright. The thing I am thrilled about is that there is not to many cars out at the late hours we normally go for a drive and also our streets mostly have street lights. Here in Vegas many places are open 24 hours so you can go to a market or an AUTO ZONE or food place etc 24 hours. We are retired and at 3 am we don't mind going shopping etc as the stores and streets seem almost empty compared to the daytime. Our old car is a joy to drive without traffic and noise and the hot sun. Even the old AM radio works better at night. Notice that the license plate light adds a little more light to the rear.

38 from rear at night.JPG

Edited by LAS VEGAS DAVE (see edit history)
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuesday November 28, 2017:  Update at the paint shop...  Rear Fenders

 

 

DSC_3142.thumb.JPG.b6b0f45b669f3ac534fbcb41b420366b.JPG

Here, the Left Rear fender is in yellow self-etch prime and the Right Rear fender is still getting the skim coat sanded smooth.

 

 

DSC_3156.thumb.JPG.02c380277551b9dc803cc34163fe47de.JPG

Both in self - etching prime inside and out.

 

 

DSC_3370.thumb.JPG.cb4c9256301c265cc4256fb1ccf806f0.JPG

Then the grey build up prime coat is applied, sanded, then sprayed with a skim coat to guide the sanding process

 

 

DSC_3373.thumb.JPG.55cc64b4ea13c4a2af6b147cbd477810.JPG

As Bob sands the grey primer, you can easily see the color change between the guide coat and the primer

 

 

DSC_3401.thumb.JPG.129cd175af2b670fc4fc63473dd038ea.JPG

Then the underside is sprayed with rubberized undercoat.

 

 

DSC_3396.thumb.JPG.bf147453b42a3ffb4a9b3e1e4998eef3.JPG

The next step is three coats of color.  Super Jet Black base coat.

 

 

DSC_3424.thumb.JPG.a05e71f81b301b6cda2fc71cf685ebca.JPG

Tack rag to prepare the fenders for the clear.

 

 

DSC_3417.thumb.JPG.5de4c92b2a9fd94eb0e505d40e5916b1.JPG

Once both are wiped clean, it's time for the clear coat.

 

 

DSC_3410.thumb.JPG.78be59f660f51920365a0ffe67752fc7.JPG

Bob mixes 3 parts Clear with 1 part activator.

 

 

DSC_3414.thumb.JPG.62068bdb046f98483115743bfe9f8fbd.JPG

This is the Activator - Reducer.

 

 

Then I had to leave because the smell was overwhelming.  

The fenders will get wet sanded and buffed Friday and hopefully I can pick them up Saturday morning and install them onto the car.

 

 

Have a great day!

Gary

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary,

 

I am new to your thread.  My brother turned me onto your remarkable project.  What is absolutely mind boggling is that you have done all this in a year ! 

 

I started my 36 Pontiac Master Six Business Coupe over a year and a half ago, only to be interrupted with issues that seem to pop up all the time, further delaying my progress.  You are giving me incentive to get that car back on the "front burner". 

 

I also have a 36 Plymouth P2 Touring Sedan.  It is mechanically in excellent condition and I drive it almost daily.  It is a survivor with only a very poor paint job (the fenders looked like yours, with the crazing showing up).  I got new running boards made for it but if I put them on, they will stick out like a sore toe in a tight shoe. 

 

Until I pull the trigger on a frame off restoration, I will drive it as it is.  I did put in a new Rhode Island Wiring and Cable complete wiring harness (the wiring was crumbling and the lights were dim), rebuilding my light switch, dimmer switch, restored my heater (like your work on yours), and went through the cooling system, clutch and brakes.  Other than that, it is all stock and original.

 

The engine has never been apart.  No need.  It runs like a top.  71,000 original miles and no knocks or lack of power.  I did source and install an original MoPar oil filter housing, replacing the throw away variety.  

 

All of us out here marvel at your tenacity and thoroughness.  You are leaving no stone un turned. My brother and I are guessing that you are self employed.  This gives you the advantage to make runs and errands in the middle of the day when necessary.  Otherwise, you are at the mercies of waiting till the weekend to drag to the hardware, auto parts store for the little things.  And you know that that is a time eating portion of any restoration.  

 

Over the Thanksgiving holiday, I started on your blog........and could NOT STOP reading.  Following every step of the way was addicting.  I too am a detailed individual and when I do something, it has to be correct or I will not do it. 

 

I do have a question. I may have missed you addressing that step;  When you are painting the black stripes in your freshly chromed pieces,  I did not see you "etching" the chrome before you painted the black into the grooves.  Were you advised to paint the accent black directly onto the chrome without "prepping" the surface before you applied the paint?  If you did not prep the chrome, what paint did you use that will adhere to the chrome without the fear of it coming off in the future? 

 

I doubt that you car will ever be subjected to being driven in inclement weather or a wash job using a hose and bucket of soap vs. misting with detailer and using the miracle fiber cloths. But still, that is a question that I have.  I will be painting my chrome pieces and if there is a specific paint for that job, I would like to know what it is.

 

Again, fantastic work.  We all await the next post sitting on the edge of our seats!

 

Randy   

 

P.S.  You can see the restoration of my heater and my instrument panel  (of the Plymouth) at my site. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow!

Randy, thank you for the nice words!  That's what keeps me going.... and of course tons and tons of helpful advice that I get daily through this site.

 

This Buick certainly is the largest project I've ever taken on.  Restoring Model "A" and Model "T" Fords seem relatively easy compared to this car, but the restoration techniques learned carry through.

 

The chrome recesses:  All I did was wipe out the depth with a tooth pick and rubbing alcohol or acetone to clean the groove.

I used Rust Oleum flat black in the grooves and wiped it off.  I hope it holds up.

 

I'm sure there is an "etchant" or an "adhesion promoter" of some sort that would keep the paint in the grooves, but like you said, this car won't be abused so I'm hopeful that the paint stays. 

 

I really appreciate everyone following along, and I hope that I have helped others out there the way the more experienced ones have helped me!

 

Respectfully,

Gary

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wednesday,  November 29, 2017:  Trunk locking mechanism

 

Today I got the trunk mechanism restored.  I think the trunk lid will be the next part painted. 

 

 

DSC_3427.thumb.JPG.cc87c9deef07f9c205d2e0ad694ea00c.JPG

Step one, of course, was to completely disassemble the unit.

 

 

 

DSC_3426.thumb.jpg.2ed2ff93bccf7c2b67550666deda9516.jpg

The side that faced the trunk lid (the side you don't see when you open the trunk) was in much worse shape than the side that faced the actual trunk.

 

 

DSC_3450.thumb.jpg.e06195e1da34e35e7a0e4da0235b3c1b.jpg

Took over an hour to wire wheel all the rust and the last remnants of the grey paint.  

Strangest thing:  As I was cleaning these parts, I could actually get a whiff of that horrible mice smell that inundated the car!  It was like it was ingrained in the paint!

 

 

DSC_3459.thumb.jpg.2c513ba2b808af6dec3311732b4185e2.jpg

All the hardware wire wheeled and washed in acetone.

 

 

DSC_3461.thumb.jpg.79c47d1d86ccde6f869ec8a266930735.jpg

All the fasteners cleaned up and ready for paint.

 

 

DSC_3464.thumb.JPG.6d4443f04885c9aa5e1f745b0d564ed8.JPG

The hardware first got a coat of SEM Self-Etching primer.  It was a beautiful 64 degree day today so perfect to paint.

 

 

DSC_3467.thumb.jpg.6b9a94f2de15b587491899317358d90d.jpg

If you've never tried the SEM primer, I recommend it highly.  Flows on smooth, no runs...  good stuff.

 

 

DSC_3485.thumb.jpg.83c582e313d5b3e58a89855c77598655.jpg

I let the primer dry in the garage two hours, then back outside to spray the SEM "Trim Black" to all the hardware.

 

 

DSC_3491.thumb.jpg.98d373dbbe4ce5a735e8c3d07811844a.jpg

I painted the screws and lock washers in a gloss black.

 

 

DSC_3500.thumb.jpg.6c9b70f195919d5f39752794b9d13169.jpg

Now hanging overnight to dry.  The trim black leaves a really nice semi-flat, satin-type finish.

It's a nice contrast to the gloss black that will be under the trunk lid.

 

 

DSC_3501.thumb.jpg.e95d867900e59350458187bafef1e90c.jpg

The flash nailed it, but the detail is not lost.

 

 

Going forward, I'll be picking up the rear fenders Saturday and most likely work with John Sat or Sun getting them installed.

I think they are much easier than the front fenders in that there are only 12 bolts per side, and all go into the rear quarter.

 

 

Have a great night!

Gary

 

 

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thursday, November 30, 2017: 

 

50K views!

 

Thanks to everyone following along!!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thursday, November 30, 2017:  Paint Shop Update:

 

IMG_7257.thumb.JPG.293f6991043cde19fabec200bb12518d.JPG

January 2017:  Condition of the air cleaner.  It was pretty dented up.

 

 

DSC_3379.thumb.JPG.0be81acaed8222c8bdcf3d93efd4e132.JPG

Bob sanded it down, and hammer - and - dollied the dents out of the lid.

 

 

DSC_3384.thumb.JPG.5c88b5c46154488540c0577b676177c6.JPG

After removing all the paint

 

 

DSC_3476.thumb.JPG.d55935cec4f8699737d91fbf83f631bb.JPG

Application of the filler to smooth out any remaining dents...

 

 

DSC_3480.thumb.JPG.351254ca88c3e67e8f9ae23b2ea8f1b0.JPG

Awaiting its final sanding / prime and Super jet Black!

 

 

DSC_3518.thumb.JPG.865dce8ebd498ad5185f8202e8363b68.JPG

Bob started wet sanding the rear fenders this morning.

 

 

DSC_3505.thumb.JPG.cbae67148e2363e52eba9bd707ab989f.JPG

Squeegee to find any spots requiring more 1200 grit wet sanding.

 

 

DSC_3508.thumb.JPG.38b1a70050f7f37aaf072840ed59d1fa.JPG

When it dries, you can see the spots that need more attention.

I'll be picking up the fenders Saturday morning, and dropping off the hood.

 

 

DSC_3495.thumb.JPG.c3518bfc080df414306117907e3c3846.JPG

I started getting the body ready for the fenders by tapping every cage nut using Copper-Eze.

I'll measure and install the fender welting tonight  using double sided tape so Saturday's install will go easy.

 

 

 

Have a good one!

Gary

 

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Gary W said:

Thursday, November 30, 2017: 

 

50K views!

 

Thanks to everyone following along!!

 

Of only you had thought to charge a dollar per view! Lol

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary, Bob has a really nice calendar on the wall..  the ol dog!!  I like it..

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

#2... Amazing work brother... 

It's very possible, this could be the most interesting and most educational Automotive blog in the world!

The attention to painstaking detail is amazing.

Must say too, you have lots of good folks following here and they obviously appreciate the hard work and level of dedication you bring to the project. 

If they could have only seen the how it started...with dad's old Lionel trains 50 years ago, they would understand even better!!

Great job Gary... as usual. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like poor Bob has hammered and dollied most of his fingers, too!  I guess that's an occupational hazard in his line of work. :wacko:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saturday and Sunday December 2 & 3, 2017:  Rear Fender installation / Brake lights / Mud Shields

 

Very busy this time of year getting ready for Santa.  This post spans the two days, as my work was more sporadic, squeezing the Buick in between Holiday parties, decorating the house, hanging lights and wreaths... you know the drill!

 

 

DSC_3787.thumb.jpg.4f71d492a4eaeaaf0dfbd5e6dd8a97d0.jpg

Saturday morning.  Getting home from Bob's shop with the newly painted rear fenders.

 

 

DSC_3944.thumb.JPG.22bbd7ad3342c30af8a1b2023d907e88.JPG

All the cage nuts are tapped with Copper-Eze.

All the running board nuts are loose so it can be adjusted fore and aft. 

Then I cut about 10 small (1") pieces of double backed tape and set them between the cage nuts.

I use the double backed tape to start aligning, measuring and cutting the fender welt.

By using the small pieces, you can measure, remove, cut, replace, measure..... until it's right.

 

 

DSC_3805.thumb.jpg.eb2cd9f28b4e9fe2995079df544328bb.jpg

Making the first preliminary slices to start forming the arch of the fender contour.  The tape keeps it steady enough to measure it out.  

I use a sharpie marker to mark the holes and make various notes.

 

 

DSC_3939.thumb.jpg.ed4893594f742c49c63349bbdc7a3e2c.jpg

After cutting the slices, punching the holes and getting the welt ready for install.

Then, I used this as a template and simply cut a duplicate for the other side.

 

 

DSC_3855.thumb.jpg.6b7a92c3b8fc7ffcd54807bf04f822aa.jpg

Now over to the driver's side.  Here, I'm laying out the double-backed tape along the inner aspect of the fender.  

Now that I have the welt cut, I use a full piece of tape the entire length.

 

 

DSC_3867.thumb.jpg.69bd936f3225b3afe68f0ccc20f1b872.jpg

Begin setting the welt in place, pushing it into the tape which holds it nice and firm.

 

 

DSC_3869.thumb.jpg.5a3218ad1fa65f9eb0d5f10c5a80930c.jpg

Finish around the rear section.  There are many slices there to make that tight turn.  

I remove the "tab" between every other slice just so it lays nice and doesn't bunch up.

 

 

DSC_3884.thumb.jpg.5b192a0fa5f48f6eb2a4f81ae60a6c8e.jpg

Close-up of the welt taped in position ready for the fender installation.

 

 

DSC_3891.thumb.JPG.d2a2da825d9731fdc3d02445b5c79e6a.JPG

My wife and I were running out to an 80th birthday party, but she still had to get ready so I grabbed my boys and the three of us got the driver's side set in position.

 

 

 

DSC_3899.thumb.jpg.a3ba3f2a3748929853df3af56463dbe2.jpg

I was watching the welt stay nice and straight as my son Kyle began running in a few bolts to hold it steady

 

 

DSC_3894.thumb.JPG.854d7c1f9f36fe228f8d903cf1ff6589.JPG

With the three of us working, the job didn't take more than 10 minutes to get her bolted in.

Kyle is pulling the tail lamp wires through the rubber base to get the tail lamp installed.

 

 

DSC_4184.thumb.jpg.3cb0c54ea36aa8d6508fdd0c9e217a83.jpg

The wires now run through the body, under the fenders and out through the hole in the top of the fender.

 

 

DSC_4186.thumb.JPG.b296156901008de8dd5f4929c0c8e540.JPG

Wire the base....

 

 

DSC_4190.thumb.jpg.49b7745c43c978eb6af89c9fe24237bd.jpg

Tighten her up!

 

 

DSC_4043.thumb.jpg.602c3ac0cffc6d963a6b658306a0b29b.jpg

Today, (Sunday), after completing my "honey-do" list, I again enlisted the crew to help me get the passenger's side rear fender installed.

 

 

DSC_4044.thumb.JPG.5bffd956add462eb286259f71d8affcd.JPG

Matthew (13) in the back, I was up front watching the running board and Kyle underneath getting some bolts started.

 

 

DSC_4063.thumb.jpg.e5cd72a668cf2d5fa883207490a2a0df.jpg

You can see him through the gas filler opening.

 

 

DSC_4062.thumb.JPG.80fd40c414618387e24328c2c718a00c.JPG

I was on welt patrol, being sure it was staying nice and even while the bolts were being drawn in.

 

 

DSC_4105.thumb.jpg.b0d9edb06098a23dd9355570c08d0835.jpg

It's great watching the kids get involved.  Finishing getting the twelve bolts installed "finger tight" to start.

 

 

 

DSC_4162.thumb.jpg.36ea744b991bfc2980b7a85e40a3d1be.jpg

I finished up this side by installing the tail lamp.  (Why is it lit, you ask?.....  I think my brake light switch is malfunctioning)

 

 

DSC_4205.thumb.jpg.e366d92caf789df7f7616a3c4fd29bb8.jpg

Here it is lit up.  

 

 

DSC_4111.thumb.jpg.6e00e3a608624862d460493ac01c8cf5.jpg

Then I went around and tightened up the twelve bolts from front to back.

 

 

DSC_0515.thumb.JPG.75a137f5c28d93c4bd98c63b02fb8d70.JPG

Then it was on to the mud flaps under there.  This was January 2017.

 

 

DSC_4201.thumb.jpg.af220f2f6aedeaef9700a9ecc4110aa8.jpg

Here we are today.  Nice transition.

 

 

DSC_4207.thumb.jpg.aed8ac0f57b33293f640422e74fd76e4.jpg

So, she's looking really nice now!  The fenders really dress it up.

 

I have to tighten up the running boards, install the gas filler tube and now try to figure out why the brake lights are constantly on.

It is only the brake wire that is live on both sides.  The other white wire is dead  (Until the lights are turned on, of course)

 

Have a great night out there!

Gary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now