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MrEarl's Daily Therapeutic Dose of Buick


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For your health's sake, here is a daily therapeutic dose of pictures or other Buick related "stuff" found on the web or maybe even some of my own. Some may be artsy, some may be old, some simple, some hot, some cold , some happy, some sad, some abstract and maybe even avant-garde or grandiose. Guaranteed to furnish only the daily minimum requirement of Buick to barely keep you going. It is not meant to be a replacement for driving or working on your Buick.

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Oh,,,,,how I remember the first time I saw the 53 headlight design/trim, really like it, STILL do.

 

Lots of those pieces ended up on customs, nice compliment to Buick designers,

 

OH, OH, how I cherish those FITTY days in the dealership, we had a 53 SKYLARK & a FITTY FO LARK, you know the FITTY FO Lark that I tore the door off at two weeks old.  MOTHER NEVER KNEW, THANKS DAD!

 

 

Dale in Indy

 

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This photo is very interesting.  I can't be certain of the year, but it looks to be a 52 Chevy in the background with the hood adjar.  That tells me that even when virtually new, the late 40- early 50's cars could, under some conditions, run hot.  Also the photo subject, the 49 Roadmaster, towing what looks to be a 25 ft trailer, with at least 3 people inside, and preparing to decline 4300 ft  on drum brakes without power assist, tell me the factory brake systems are truly well designed.  This makes me feel a lot more confident about my 56.

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3 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

This photo is very interesting.  I can't be certain of the year, but it looks to be a 52 Chevy in the background with the hood adjar.  That tells me that even when virtually new, the late 40- early 50's cars could, under some conditions, run hot.  Also the photo subject, the 49 Roadmaster, towing what looks to be a 25 ft trailer, with at least 3 people inside, and preparing to decline 4300 ft  on drum brakes without power assist, tell me the factory brake systems are truly well designed.  This makes me feel a lot more confident about my 56.

 

The fact that people did it doesn't mean it was smart!

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8 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

This photo is very interesting.  I can't be certain of the year, but it looks to be a 52 Chevy in the background with the hood adjar.  That tells me that even when virtually new, the late 40- early 50's cars could, under some conditions, run hot.  Also the photo subject, the 49 Roadmaster, towing what looks to be a 25 ft trailer, with at least 3 people inside, and preparing to decline 4300 ft  on drum brakes without power assist, tell me the factory brake systems are truly well designed.  This makes me feel a lot more confident about my 56.

I was thinking about how the h*** they towed that giant trailer all the way UP there!    Now that you mention, yes the descent would be scary!

Edited by wndsofchng06
missed a letter (see edit history)
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Looks like the RM had a water bag on bumper, maybe a window water cooler, don't know what that item is on center hood?

 

4300 feet up, I don't know how steep the path up, but probably not the only car to make it up, & down.

 

We all know you don't have to rely totally on brakes, use a lower gear, don't ride the brakes, and do what you can to keep the speed down.

 

Many states back then forbid riders in the trailer as it was moving.

 

Dale in Indy

 

 

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It is a steep path now, and was worse before the road was modernized.  Poor 49 did not have an easy day. 

 

Could a 49 Roady be ordered with manual trans?  I doubt it could have made that hill with a Dynaflow...

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22 minutes ago, Fr. Buick said:

It is a steep path now, and was worse before the road was modernized.  Poor 49 did not have an easy day. 

 

Could a 49 Roady be ordered with manual trans?  I doubt it could have made that hill with a Dynaflow...

My first impression of the picture was:  YIKES!!

But if properly equipped (trailer brakes, load equalizing hitch, anti-sway, standard transmission, 4.XX rear gears) if would be fine.  I noticed blackwall tires on the rear...probably truck tires.

Still, if I had to go down the hill in front of it, I would want a 2 mile head start!

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6 hours ago, MrEarl said:

image.jpeg

 

Note that the biggest trailer in the park is pulled by a BUICK!

12932952_10207665870059644_1070174249049

 

Back when the wife sold new trucks, a GM factory rep was in town for a visit and said something very true:  Just about anything can get a trailer moving and keep it moving (especially if you don't care how fast it moves).  It's when it's time to STOP the trailer that things start to break!

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34 minutes ago, JohnD1956 said:

It looks like the same Buick from the first picture.  Perhaps the first trailer did not make it down the pass afterall?

I'm pretty sure it's the same Buick and same trailer. If you ask me, that trailer is every inch of 30'.  Anyone know the overall length of a '49 Roady?  I think you could get 2 of them in the length of that thing!

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56 minutes ago, SpecialEducation said:

I'm pretty sure it's the same Buick and same trailer. If you ask me, that trailer is every inch of 30'.  Anyone know the overall length of a '49 Roady?  I think you could get 2 of them in the length of that thing!

X2, I think the sun reflecting off the front of the trailer blocks out the writing over the window.   What's the car in the foreground pulling what looks like a motorcycle under a tarp?

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Yeah, they both say "The Magic Carpet" but additional Google searching hasn't produced more images or any more of the story for me.

 

Every time I look at that thing, I think of The Long, Long Trailer.

3969be24.jpg

 

That's a 34' trailer being pulled by a Merc.  Incidentally, the old flathead F*rd under the hood didn't have the guts to get the job done, so a stinkin' Lincoln had to step in for a few takes.  If they had just started with a Buick...

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20 hours ago, wndsofchng06 said:

I was thinking about how the h*** they towed that giant trailer all the way UP there!    Now that you mention, yes the descent would be scary!

 

 The trailer has brakes.  I did it in 1957 with a '52 Studebaker towing a 33 ft trailer. Coming down was not as scary as going up, not knowing if the engine was going to conk out.  Ahh, the things we did before we discovered " you can't do that!". 

 

  Ben

 

  P.S.  Burned the bearings out of the engine. That little 

Studebaker Commander was geared too high.

 

  Ben

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6 minutes ago, First Born said:

 

 The trailer has brakes.  

 

  Ben

  

My car hauling  trailer has brakes too, but that doesn't remove the anxiety of when approaching every green light and you silently mutter "don't you change, don't you change, don't you.... you SOB,  now do I stop or do I kick it and hope there's not a traffic camera watching"  Red lights have a morbid sense of humor 

I imgine  the torque that these old Buick engines had played into why you saw so many Buick's pulling big trailers. I have  a McCulloch supercharger that came off of a 55 Buick estate wagon that was used by the owner of a mobile home park to pull mobile homes around with.  That combination probably work well 

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And while on the subject of Buick trailering

 

image.jpeg

 

 Sort of makes me want to go out and buy a canned ham to pull behind Buttercup ... someday ...

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Fools who don't understand that P=m*v and cut me off cause more anxiety than traffic lights. 

 

Towing a Buick in an enclosed hauler gives a perspective and additional respect to what truckers deal with. 

 

That reminds me...I need to discuss the above equation and distance to pull back in front after passing a semi with the younger drivers in the house. 

 

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17 hours ago, RivNut said:

I think that Mr. Ear will like this one. Matching paint; matching side spears.

 

Buick_Roadmaster_Riviera_with_travel_tra

 

Ed

 

Love the car. Trailer..... ummm, not so much...

and I hope that is a typo and you are not making fun of my big ears?-_- :D

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8 hours ago, Thriller said:

Fools who don't understand that P=m*v and cut me off cause more anxiety than traffic lights. 

 

Towing a Buick in an enclosed hauler gives a perspective and additional respect to what truckers deal with. 

 

That reminds me...I need to discuss the above equation and distance to pull back in front after passing a semi with the younger drivers in the house. 

 

 

Oh, the stories I could tell... I used to move new cars cross-country for the Buick Pontiac GMC dealer my wife worked for.  We were in Norman (south Oklahoma City metro), and had sister dealerships in Broken Arrow (SE Tulsa) and Colorado springs that we traded with quite a bit.  The dealership had 3 rigs for trailering cars, and I was one of the few that was willing to drive the one with surge brakes. 

 

If you're unfamiliar, surge brakes use the force of the trailer pushing against the tow vehicle to apply hydraulic pressure to the trailer brakes.  It's simple & effective, requires no special wiring on the towing vehicle (which was usually a 3/4 ton truck plucked from the back row of the used lot), and works great on flat, straight road - which there is no shortage of in Oklahoma and Texas.

 

Flat, straight road is a little harder to find in Colorado Springs, though.  That fact is not very bothersome until you are coming around a tight curve on a steep grade, and some old blue-hair pulls out in front of you and proceeds to go nowhere.  You see, when the trailer is not straight behind the tractor, the surge brakes become less effective, which then makes the trailer want to push the back end of the tractor sideways, which makes the brakes even less effective, which makes the tractor even more sideways...  Not that I was ever actually passed by a brand new $60k SUV that I was hauling, but there were times that the possibility seemed awfully close!

Edited by SpecialEducation (see edit history)
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 I have done quite a bit of trailering but I am unfamiliar with the equation of which  you speak Thriller, can you  break that down into simpler terms 

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1 hour ago, MrEarl said:

 I have done quite a bit of trailering but I am unfamiliar with the equation of which  you speak Thriller, can you  break that down into simpler terms 

Welcome to Physics 101.

P=m*v  means,  "Momentum equals Mass times Velocity"

Works pretty good in a straight line, but as Special Ed stated, on our twisty mountain roads with "surge brakes" you have to throw in the "Vector".

You get the trailer kinked around in the middle of the turn and hit the brakes, that "surge" can kick your hind end right over the edge.

There are more than a couple of trailers at the bottom of Monarch Pass, deposited there by "flatlanders" who learned this lesson the hard way.

Particularly since guard rails are few and far between. Makes it easier to push the snow off the road.

We also lost a snow plow that way last year.

 

Mike in Colorado

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My father-in-law and mother-in-law were passengers in a Pontiac station wagon being driven by a friend of theirs when the two couples were vacationing in Colorado.  All of a sudden as they were going down a mountain they were passed by a Jeep being driven by a set of golf clubs.  The Jeep had come loose from the Pontiac wagon and the grade was steep enough that the Jeep just took off on its own.   They were able to pull it from a guard rail about another 1/4 mile down the road and continued on down the road.

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