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Your USED Tools Are Not Solid Gold (Dover)


63RedBrier
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We have all seen the photo of the Pontiac going back to nature on the beach, then there is this guy in Delaware...

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© craigslist - Map data © OpenStreetMap

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Your sockets are probably worn, your power tool anvils may be bent and/or worn, wrenches starting to be rounded, power tools with hundreds of hours on them. There is something with Delaware when it comes to people selling their tools and vehicles and thinking they are worth far more than they really are. Selling a brand new item? That's cool. People are getting the same thing from a store WITH a warranty thanks to a receipt. 220k mile Silverado? No, it is not worth $5,000 - East Coast road salt/ocean salt rust and without guaranteed vehicle servicing records? How about that furniture? Who knows what disgusting things were done on that couch; ripping Chipolte night gas on the cushions do not up the price. You also know those appliances you are selling had roaches in them - bugs don't increase the value of your fridge.
Might want to re-think that pricing, champ. """""""""""""""Like New""""""""""""""
  • do NOT contact me with unsolicited services or offers
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I once heard a scientific study on this phenomenon. According to research conducted, people consider an item inherently MORE valuable if they own it vs one they do not own. 

 

It was an interesting study that looked into how we value things, interesting stuff and practical for getting in a seller's mindset when making purchases. 

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3 hours ago, 63RedBrier said:

We have all seen the photo of the Pontiac going back to nature on the beach, then there is this guy in Delaware...

1
3125.png3125.png3126.png3126.png
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
© craigslist - Map data © OpenStreetMap

condition: like new

Your sockets are probably worn, your power tool anvils may be bent and/or worn, wrenches starting to be rounded, power tools with hundreds of hours on them. There is something with Delaware when it comes to people selling their tools and vehicles and thinking they are worth far more than they really are. Selling a brand new item? That's cool. People are getting the same thing from a store WITH a warranty thanks to a receipt. 220k mile Silverado? No, it is not worth $5,000 - East Coast road salt/ocean salt rust and without guaranteed vehicle servicing records? How about that furniture? Who knows what disgusting things were done on that couch; ripping Chipolte night gas on the cushions do not up the price. You also know those appliances you are selling had roaches in them - bugs don't increase the value of your fridge.
Might want to re-think that pricing, champ. """""""""""""""Like New""""""""""""""

  • do NOT contact me with unsolicited services or offers

You don't have to buy anything you don't think is worthy of the price. The person selling it is not the fool, It's the person that buys it for an outlandish price. The old case of supply and demand. Same goes for politicians, you either believe them or you don't, vote for them or you don't. That's the way the world works, it's not the fault of the person that want's to make a fortune on junk. 

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I try to make my sales presentation look like I made a mistake and the buyer would be taking advantage of me. No one has ever contacted me to point out my error. But a few have rushed in to buy and come back whining when they discover it was fairly priced and they didn't steal it.

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Some folks seem to take deep, personal offense to "overpriced" merchandise. I pay little mind. The market takes care of that stuff. Always. The seller can eat that old couch; they can be buried with that 10 year old Harbor Freight sander. Neither harms me.

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I always have an eye out for very good quality, used tools at swap meets and garage sales. Once I see the price tag 99% of them are still sitting on the table when I walk away. But I still manage to make a number of purchases each year. Over the decades my tool collection has become quite substantial. Every year there are thousands of tools on offer at events I attend, I can afford to be choosey.

 

Unfortunately the same isn't even remotely true with the vintage car parts that are the main reason for attending swap meets in the first place. Over the last 25 years , early parts have gone from scarce to rare to barely existent. Pacific North West events.

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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Every time I've loaded up to be a vendor, my expectation is to not bring that stuff home.   I usually sell stuff and immmediatly shop for more stuff.

I see my old stuff that I sold the first day in other booths on day 2 and 3.   Usually at a big mark up.  Sometimes I see it the next year too.  But, 

I'm happy it's gone.  

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1 hour ago, JFranklin said:

Did you buy Brady's last  retirement football?

When I wrote that I was remembering an old guy who asked about my reel mounted fluorescent trouble light. He excused himself and walked outside. I think he checked his pockets to make sure I hadn't spent his money on it.

 

Back in the early 1980's I spent about $50 on a pitman arm puller. It may have been the only one within a 15 mile radius from the way guys came around to borrow it. Still makes me smile when I open that drawer.

 

Money and old car guys have been some of the greatest antics I have watched in my whole life.

 

Way back an unwritten policy arose. My wife got my paycheck and my hobby money came from selling car stuff or servicing them. When I appear to be over spending just consider who that money came from. I don't take change very often. My wife says the buffalo milk squeezed out of the nickles is hard to get out in the wash.

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I can't help but chuckle a bit about some of this. My 2014 Silverado has 220,000 miles, although it still looks quite sharp, very good bright red paint, nice interior, loaded with options. I recently added a used heavy duty pickup to my fleet for hauling heavy trailers, and an acquaintance assumed I would be selling the Silverado. He came over and checked it out, and offered me $15,000. I declined, as I still like the truck, and it's WAY better on fuel than the diesel I just bought. And in our local market, trucks have to be pretty rough to be sold under 10 grand. 

 

As someone said above, the natural free market always resolves overpricing issues. I try not to be bothered much by such things. 

 

Cheers! 

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4 hours ago, Terry Bond said:

Ever notice almost everything on evilbay is "rare?"

Terry 

Well it's old and they're not making anymore of them, so naturally, it's rare. Right? Of course, they're not making anymore 2021 cars either. Oh well I tried! The problem with rare is that there are a lot of antiques of all kinds that are rare and it has no affect on their value. They're still worthless!

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My 85 HP Ford Pickup does not do much towing, but it's a great Utility truck for carrying the 1 HP bulldozer for the Boo Bros. 

I think there is still a market for it.   A V8 with 3 on the floor and a 411 rear end like the song says.  Comes with a gun Rack, but no cup holders.

 

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Edited by Paul Dobbin
text reposition, why does that happen??? (see edit history)
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 I do check CL every day. There has been a few items that I have bought,  but most, as mentioned, are priced on the moon.

 

 I did find a bargain once, it was a 100 year old, 8' cast iron brake that had fallen off of a truck and broke unobtanium cast parts. The owner had hoped to send his son to collage with the money from the sale before it fell and broke. 

 

 I bought it for close to scrap. I guess that he didn't know that it could be repaired with steel and a little imagination.

  After I repaired it, I sold my modern steel brake and came out way ahead with the money.

 You can't imagine what you can break with a 3000 lb. brake!

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But the “rare” thing works. Our local online auction house only has to include it in the description of an item and there are multiple bids and the price is way up days before the sale. I really don’t believe they know whether it’s rare or not, and it’s generally an estate sale so the owner isn’t there to tell them, but, hey, if it helps the take on the sale, then that’s what’s done

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Sounds like a song and the band is Dover. I could write that one. 😁 Ain't no gold in that old box. Just rusty worn chrome. Aint no gold in that old box. Get it in your dome. 😜 Rock it baby. Dandy Dave!

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