playswithbrass

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About playswithbrass

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  • Location:
    London, Ontario

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  1. playswithbrass

    Jacox or other Steering Box

    What are you going to use it on?
  2. playswithbrass

    Old BOSS TIRE TOOLS

    Terry ,wow I do like your part store.Would you please post some more pictures? Thanking you in advance pete
  3. playswithbrass

    Flexplate question

    First let me congratulate you on using the correct name! It is not the ring gear which is found with the pinion. When I worked in the dealership used six inch long bolts to take the place of the original bolts already there,remove the torque converter bolts, all bell housing bolts and trans mount bolts,then slide the trans back on the six inch bolts ,use a pry bar between the flex plate and the torque converter to help.You then have just enough room to undue the flex plate bolts and remove the plate. Doing it this way keep the tranny in line for reassemble and you do not have to undue cooler lines,shifter etc.. It was called the flat rate way. When I started my apprenticeship I was told first you learn the correct way to do the job then when you are good you can use the flat rate way. Cheers pete
  4. playswithbrass

    What to do with beautiful original tires - 27 years old

    Are you sure this car was not originally supplied with Goodyear’s? Isn’t U.S. Royal an after market tire? There should be a date stamp on them somewhere Cheers. Pete
  5. playswithbrass

    Where do you get rare parts ?

    Yes always try to get the best for your money.This took 13 years but, did I learn a lot .Anybody know of another 1912 McIntyre? Super rare ,but not a big buck car.cheers Pete
  6. playswithbrass

    GM Headlight Switch- removal

    Pull the switch out,then reach under to the body of the switch and and depress the spring loaded button and at the same time pull out the knob.Spring loaded button opposite side to the wiring connector. Hopes this helps.cheers pete
  7. playswithbrass

    Where do you get rare parts ?

    Word of mouth,networking in a circle of like minded people.Don't expect this to happen overnight,it will take years to establish your credibility .Many try ,few succeed,because they want instant gratification . Once you have established that you are a honest and sincere hobbyist you will be amazed what is available to you.It does also help to have a machine shop in the basement. Cheers Pete
  8. playswithbrass

    Heading to USA

    Lump, you should try Marmite from the UK and you would be even more convinced what makes people drive on the other side of the road
  9. playswithbrass

    Car on old shipwreck

    https://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/90-years-later-ghost-shipwreck-at-bottom-of-lake-huron-in-remarkable-shape Thought you would all find this interesting.
  10. playswithbrass

    What do you display with your car at a show?

    Please nobody say a crybaby kid!
  11. playswithbrass

    HORSE HAIR UPHOLSTERY MATERIAL

    Be careful with horsehair. We stored some in the basement and then got an awful lot of clothes moths. Found the bag was full of them.
  12. playswithbrass

    What to material to use between a wood and metal joint?

    Twenty years ago I had a similar problem.I used urethane windshield setting sealer and painted over it.Still has not cracked.
  13. playswithbrass

    What's your most 'unexpected' part find?

    Finding the sales brochure for my 1912 McIntyre in mint condition.
  14. playswithbrass

    How do you undo early pre WW1 universal joints?

    You will probably have to disconnect the rear end from the leaf springs and and move it rearward to gain the required clearance to remove the driveshaft. Pete. Ps brake rods etc.
  15. It would be what is referred to as a similar fluid grease.Most early cars run this instead of the steam cylinder 600 oil.I use a ESSO product Marvelube grease EP 9F in the transaxles of my early cars.