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Period RACE CAR Images to Relieve some of the Stress


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Here is a #9 Locomobile, but I don't know what year it is. Race car numbers are a bit of a mystery, did the car get a different one the following year, did they change from event to the next event? The number mystery went on well after WWII if you look at race programs, guess there were a lot of extra numerals added with tape. Bob 

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Very nice  reading material here.. ! wouuw .. thank you all   .!

 

I have a question .?

does the name   JEAN BIER SABIN car sounds familiar to any one here..?

it's a 1914,  4 cylinder SUPERCHARGED chain driven car.

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1 hour ago, apolo1100 said:

 

Very nice  reading material here.. ! wouuw .. thank you all   .!

 

I have a question .?

does the name   JEAN BIER SABIN car sounds familiar to any one here..?

it's a 1914,  4 cylinder SUPERCHARGED chain driven car.

 

 

Something other than a Chadwick? Bob 

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This is a 1907 type 40 Locomobile. Two of these stock cars were stripped down by Andrew Riker, the chief engineer at Locomobile, to enter into races after the #16 car and its sister, the number #1 car, were produced at a cost of $40,000, something akin to $800,000 today, when new Locomobiles were selling for $3000. The #1 car was destroyed at the end of the 1906 Vanderbilt Cup Race and the #16 car was used for promotions but I don't believe it was entered into another race. Locomobile was a low production company and its leadership intended to keep it so. The company would need to sale a lot of cars to justify the  cost of special race cars so after the 1906 race, the two stock cars were used.

 

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I believe car numbers were issued for each race by the race promoters. The numbers on Locomobile's cars changed with each race. This may be one reason the #16 Locomobile car was never entered into another race, that and the fact that if it had lost the next race, the opportunity for publicity would have been greatly diminished.

 

 

Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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Here is Russ Snowberger in 1930 with his Studebaker President straight-8 powered car.  It must have been a posed shot as he is wearing a tie and the radiator hose is not connected.

 

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Interesting. I think in those times most men wore white shirts and ties while at work. Though I never met him or have no way to know but it was said of my great uncle that He could go under a car and work on it all day and come back out just as clean as he went under, all while wearing white pants and a white shirt.

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Apolo,

 

Chadwick is attributed the use of the first supercharger. An early Chadwick is or has been put together and there is an effort to make a supercharger to install on the car. You can read about it on The Old Motor website. As to the name you referenced, I googled it and nothing comes up. Can you provide any other information?

 

 

Edited by AHa
typo (see edit history)
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In 1915 Carl Fisher drove this custom Packard 3-38 roadster as the Pace car for the 1915 Indy 500 race. Here is the car at the start of the race , the next photo is the same car on the Indy track in 2016

I500-1915-Starting.jpg

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Model T Ford based dirt car, Buffalo wire wheels, most likely a Fronty head, car behind it has a Model A axle so this it at the end of T based cars 1928 or so. Bob 

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8 hours ago, AHa said:

Apolo,

 

Chadwick is attributed the use of the first supercharger. An early Chadwick is or has been put together and there is an effort to make a supercharger to install on the car. You can read about it on The Old Motor website. As to the name you referenced, I googled it and nothing comes up. Can you provide any other information?

 

 

My honey's dad told us about a relative of his. Turned out to be Chadwick who originally started out making commercial, laundry machine mechanisms and graduated to stoves. Then got into cars and supercharged stuff.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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The Corona Speedway used Grand Ave as the track.

Side streets were closed off and they raced around Grand Ave, which was one giant circle.

It was one of the premier races in the US before the Great War.

Grand Ave is still configured the same way and most of the historic houses on the south end of Grand Ave are still there today.

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Thank you zepher for posting that! I have seen that poster before on the internet, but did not have a good copy to post (and I am really not that good with computers!).

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And it looks like they had quite a large gathering to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of the Corona Road Races.

 

 

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1923 INDY 500 winner Tommy Milton in the HCS Special. There were no Stutz parts in the car other than the signature on the check to Harry Miller. It won INDY with a standard MILLER radiator shell. The car is totally restored today. Bob 

OIP.jpg

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Capt Eddie had an amazing life.

He lived more in his one life than the average dozen people do in theirs.

 

I am very proud and honored to own one of his namesake cars, a signed copy of his autobiography and some memorabilia from his incredible life.

 

I own one of the finest automobiles ever produced in the world, but my avatar is in reverence to the man that was larger than life.

Edited by zepher (see edit history)
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19 minutes ago, zepher said:

Capt Eddie had an amazing life.

He lived more in his one life than the average dozen people do in theirs.

 

I am very proud and honored to own one of his namesake cars, a signed copy of his autobiography and some memorabilia from his incredible life.

 

I own one of the finest automobiles ever produced in the world, but my avatar is in reverence to the man that was larger than life.

 

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Zepher, I'd like your opinion on this picture I bought off eBay years ago because it was Maxwell related. It shows drivers having what I assume was a post win toast. What is your opinion on the left hand driver being Eddie?

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If that is Eddie, then he had to be really young in that picture.

Maybe too young to have been a driver for Maxwell at that time.

It just doesn't look like Capt Eddie enough to me.

Maybe the others could be cross referenced as being his mechanics at the time?

 

But what a great piece of racing history!

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40 minutes ago, zepher said:

If that is Eddie, then he had to be really young in that picture.

Maybe too young to have been a driver for Maxwell at that time.

It just doesn't look like Capt Eddie enough to me.

Maybe the others could be cross referenced as being his mechanics at the time?

 

But what a great piece of racing history!

 

He would have been 24-25 years old and this picture supposedly shows him before he drove for Maxwell.417914400_Maxwellteam1.jpg.c4a29f7a9a255edb9ad731b212c2330e.jpg

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19 minutes ago, hddennis said:

 

He would have been 24-25 years old and this picture supposedly shows him before he drove for Maxwell.417914400_Maxwellteam1.jpg.c4a29f7a9a255edb9ad731b212c2330e.jpg

 

Capt Eddie is on the far left for those that are wondering.

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On 4/21/2020 at 7:37 AM, Steve Moskowitz said:

Those helmets did a lot of good!  :)

 

My car is the Caleb Bragg third from the left. It is an S74 Fiat that won the American Grand Prix in 1912 in Milwaukie, Wisconsin  I have raced it for many years and it is a blast to drive with 180 hp and 750 foot pounds of torque.  (from George Wingard current owner ...the engine compartment must be seen to be believed!)

 

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The Fiat S74 needed a tall hood because of the 200 mm engine stroke and the overhead camshaft.

 

 

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It is fantastic to see era pictures of early cars and then find out that specific cars in the photos still exist! Restored and showing their "stuff" again and still.

Thank you for posting that engine photo!

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27 minutes ago, wayne sheldon said:

It is fantastic to see era pictures of early cars and then find out that specific cars in the photos still exist! Restored and showing their "stuff" again and still.

Thank you for posting that engine photo!

 

I have seen it run, although it was about 30 years ago that it visited NZ. I recall them push starting it - it would light up in a cloud smoke, sort of like a big radial aircraft engine - but then clear and run strong. The car is chassis #1 the car that Caleb Bragg used to win the 1912(?) US GP. Not sure who drove it in European events.

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I would love to hear the story of how the S74 Bragg car survived. I find it very curious why some cars are saved through time and others disappear completely. Sometimes the car is intentionally saved but other times the car gets saved because it is lost and forgotten and rediscovered. The Locomobile old 16 is an example of a car that was intentionally saved. On the other hand, the car Locomobile built one year earlier for Mr Harold Thomas, which placed third, remains lost. Both cars were huge works of mechanical engineering, and costing thousands of dollars to build. One would think after such a large outlay of cash to build the car, it would remain to this day.

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This has been a fantastic topic and I could look at the photos for hours.  In my own archives there are several that I would love to know more about.  This photo is what I believe to be an American Underslung but when? What race?  Who is the driver?   Another challenge for racing enthusiasts-

A few more early unidentified car/event photos coming later.

Terry

American Underslung.jpg

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Here is another unique action shot. Notice the riding mechanic is holding the spare tire and appears to be bare holding on.

The Vanderbilt Cup | Hemmings Daily

This car sure is smoking bad.

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4 hours ago, AHa said:

I would love to hear the story of how the S74 Bragg car survived. I find it very curious why some cars are saved through time and others disappear completely. Sometimes the car is intentionally saved but other times the car gets saved because it is lost and forgotten and rediscovered. The Locomobile old 16 is an example of a car that was intentionally saved. On the other hand, the car Locomobile built one year earlier for Mr Harold Thomas, which placed third, remains lost. Both cars were huge works of mechanical engineering, and costing thousands of dollars to build. One would think after such a large outlay of cash to build the car, it would remain to this day.

 

The reality with race cars is that they become obsolete quickly. Particularly race cars that are not modified production cars. Parts rapidly become completely unavailable . And even if you could keep it running what would a person do with a 5 year old race car? No such thing as vintage racing up until the late 1970's.

A handful survived, and a further handful have been recreated either from a few fragments of a completely new construction. But 95% of them were crashed , engines blown up and never rebuilt, used up as spares, left derelict and ultimately scrapped, you name it. It is really only in the later 1970's and later that anything other than a few 

very significant early race cars were sought after. Once they were obsolete as a competitive race car they were just so much metal. And most ended up back in the furnace. 

It happens to this day. The real danger zone is when they are 5 - 20 years old. Non - competitive for what they were built for, and as likely to get parted out as to survive intact. Entry level class cars survive better, say Formula Ford. Because technology does not progress as quickly in the lower class ranks. And there are always new drivers wanting to get their feet wet in an older / cheaper car. But mid rank classes and higher the tech moves very quickly

and the costs are very high even for an older car. If you can afford racing at this level it only makes sense to use as up to date a car as possible. So a 5 year old car is a totally lost cause. Things were not any different 100 years ago. Salvage what you can from the 2 years ago car and put the money into this years car.

 

Greg in Canada

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