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Period RACE CAR Images to Relieve some of the Stress


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More Lnaghorne photos from the files at the AACA Library & Research Center...tons of race track brochures have been saved from a huge variety of tracks.  Very cool material.  We have a bunch of board track stuff too I will try to find at lunch time. 

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I hope these come out well enough to be seen. They are from a small booklet 2 1/4 x 3 3/8 inches of the Brooklands race track in England  most likely dating from the immediate post WWI era.

Cover says "The Snapshot Album of Brooklands Motor Course - Weybridge - Vest pocket Souvenir. " back cover states : Official publication by permission of Brooklands Automobile Racing Club.

Due to the nature of how it was made is difficult to scan .

 

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Edited by Walt G
typo (see edit history)
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Walt those are awesome!  I will try to post more stuff over the weekend but I hope some of the early race car guys jump on this...some pretty fascinating photos.  

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Here is a picture of Jimmy Murphy driving and my great uncle Ernie Olson the riding mechanic at their win at LeMans France in 1921.  They were driving a Duesenberg.

 

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55 minutes ago, A. Ballard 35R said:

I believe the first American car to win Le Mans was the GT 40 Ford in 1966. Where all did this outstanding car race, especially with your great uncle as mechanician?

 

Actually not true.  They won LeMans and then came back and won the 1922 Indianapolis 500.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1921_French_Grand_Prix

 

Here is the Indy story.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1922_Indianapolis_500

 

Both in the #12 Duesenberg.  The car is on display in the Indy track museum

 

Additional information on the race, etc...

 

https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/articles/single-seaters/f1/jimmy-murphys-1921-french-gp-victory

 

One of the  best memories I have of him was when he and his wife Yvonne came to our wedding in 1978.  We have pictures of their attendance.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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So how many of you knew that the stadium at  Hershey that is now home to football games , concerts and the race car conditioning runs in October was once a real race track!  14,000 seats, paved, crash rail and in the background the famed Hershey Hotel!!

 

 

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42 minutes ago, Larry Schramm said:

 

Actually not true.  They won LeMans and then came back and won the 1922 Indianapolis 500.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1921_French_Grand_Prix

 

Here is the Indy story.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1922_Indianapolis_500

 

Both in the #12 Duesenberg.  The car is on display in the Indy track museum

 

Additional information on the race, etc...

 

https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/articles/single-seaters/f1/jimmy-murphys-1921-french-gp-victory

 

One of the  best memories I have of him was when he and his wife Yvonne came to our wedding in 1978.  We have pictures of their attendance.

 

 The first Le Mans 24 hour race was 1923. The event at Le Mans - not the same circuit as the 24 hour event - in 1921 that Duesenberg won was the French Grand Prix. 

 

American cars ran at Le Mans in the late 1920s - Chrysler and Stutz - but did not win. Neither were 'factory' efforts. 

 

I think Ballard is right in saying that the 1966 win was the first by an American car - even though it was engineered and built in England it was powered and financed by Ford - and the drivers were New Zealanders.

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OK all , as you can see despite all that AACA CEO Steve Moskowitz has to do for our club he is taking the time to post race car period photos as well. Sure he loves them , but what a thrill and opportunity for all of us to see what "OUR CLUB LIBRARY" has!   I am doing this in bold type to urge all of you, to take a few minutes and look to see what you can come up with that would be great for all of us to see, be it here in the race car images or elsewhere. Yes, the historian /author in me is speaking about this but also give it some consideration that period images give us exactly that open window to the past that we are curious about - be it cars of 25 years ago or over 100 years ago. Help us all out , share what you have, it doesn't take much to "give back" and by sharing what you have it benefits all of us , and it may be the one moment in the day some people can think 'wow that was cool' and it made them feel good. Preservation of vehicles history is what AACA is all about. SUPPORT YOUR CLUB , note it is your club.

End of lecture 974 1/2 ...............................thanks, Walt Gosden

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Look up Ray Nichels for an interesting read.  
 

Ray was involved with Indy cars and NASCAR.  He worked with Pontiac’s ‘Bunkie’ Knudson, then became MOPAR’s man to roll out the 426 Race Hemi in 1964 when GM pulled out of racing.  Drivers for Nichels were from A to Z, included AJ Foyt and Paul Goldsmith (pictures 1 & 3 - Pat O’Conner - last picture).

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Edited by Uncle_Buck (see edit history)
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I have know way of positively identifying the fellow in the photo, but I believe it is H.D. Carpenter of Philadelphia with the ex Ira Vail 1919 INDY 500 factory Hudson team car. He bought it from Ira Vail and raced it locally and drove it on the street. The car would turn up for sale on a used car lot some time around 1948, and made the letters to the editor with a photo in Motor Trend. I had the issue but it got sold or misplaced. If you have a full run of the magazine and free time it would be good to see again. D. Cameron Peck bought the car, then sold it to Lindley Bothwell who painted it yellow. I was featured in Old Cars Illustrated, then Bill Harrah bought it. I had a chance to buy it at a Harrah auction, but passed, building the house was more important. Tom Barrett bought it and restored it. Today it is in South Korea the the Samsung collection.

 

Bob 

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Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
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I like this National as well. Some say it is a staged picture but wow what a picture. Some years ago a friend had a brass era National chassis. The thought at the time was it would be too expensive to restore, it needing a body constructed. By the time I figured out what I could do with it, he had sold it.

 

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8 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

I have know way of positively identifying the fellow in the photo, but I believe it is H.D. Carpenter of Philadelphia with the ex Ira Vail 1919 INDY 500 factory Hudson team car. He bought it from Ira Vail and raced it locally and drove it on the street. The car would turn up for sale on a used car lot some time around 1948, and made the letters to the editor with a photo in Motor Trend. I had the issue but it got sold or misplaced. If you have a full run of the magazine and free time it would be good to see again. D. Cameron Peck bought the car, then sold it to Lindley Bothwell who painted it yellow. I was featured in Old Cars Illustrated, then Bill Harrah bought it. I had a chance to buy it at a Harrah auction, but passed, building the house was more important. Tom Barrett bought it and restored it. Today it is in South Korea the the Samsung collection.

 

Bob 

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Bob- I believe this the Hudson Racecar you are referring to? This was at the 1981 Harrah's Auction. I was at the sale, even though I was still just a kid.

 

This was the first auction after Harrah's death and preceeded the big auctions in the mid/later 1980s. I remember hearing from Clyde Wade and others that this particular auction was to get rid of the "junk" cars that were outside and not indoors. Most of the cars at this auction were either unrestored, unfinished or great originals. I remember walking around the open sided, covered sheds and seeing this race car with the other cars. The other "junk" cars included in this auction included a 1913 50HP Pope Hartford,  1907 60HP Stearns, Stout Scarab, 1912 Packard 30 Runabout, 1912 Mercer Type 35 Touring (probably a raceabout today....!!!) 1939 Graham with a Saouchik, sliding door, convertible body, Stutz DV-32 Lebaron 4P speedster, Stutz Monte Carlo, Hispano, Bugatti,  numerous smaller brass cars and open/closed Full Classics. Of course, there were lots  great early Fords and numerous Franklins. There was virtually nothing in the sale newer than WWII. There were 143 lots in this auction-mostly cars but also some boats and planes.

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Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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Well, Walt G wants to push (encourage!) people to add photos, I guess I should try to post a few. Most of what I have on my computer has been shown on various places before, so some here may recognize a few of them. However, if this works, and there are no complaints, I will try to share a few others I have.

 

This is one of my favorite era action shots of a model T racing car. Several photos were taken that day, and this car appears in a few of them. 

Notice the left front wheel! The car has steel disc wheel covers on it. The stamped covers are attached on the outer side of the wooden spoke wheel to give the appearance of steel disc wheels. Such wheel covers came in a variety of styles, and quality. Many such sets had both inner and outer covers for a more complete appearance. This is likely a cheaper set with only outer covers. Even cheaper sets had nearly flat sheet metal, and also show up in era photos from time to time.

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I don't try to "harvest" too many photos of racing cars (sometimes I wish I had?). Usually pictures that have some details or information I am particularly interested in. 

 

This one, not a Ford, and I do not know what it is. But it intrigued me so much I just had to clip it. I get the feeling from the photo that it was likely taken somewhere in Europe.

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This is a Morton & Brett brochure for the car body in the photos Wayne posted above, note the different wheel choices on the cars. Radiator shell options also differed, the one in the photos is referred to as Fiat Style. Bob 

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Altoona  board speedway in 1931.  1 1/4 mile track.  I hope the resolution shows the condition of the boards..yikes!  I have read stories of splinters and chunks of wood flying at the faces of the drivers and the condition of this track proves it!  Some special kind of bravery to drive back in those days.  

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Wayne, I dare say none of us have any original photos. They have all been circulated across the web but it doesn't hurt anything to post them again here. Please, post away!

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13 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

I don't try to "harvest" too many photos of racing cars (sometimes I wish I had?). Usually pictures that have some details or information I am particularly interested in. 

 

This one, not a Ford, and I do not know what it is. But it intrigued me so much I just had to clip it. I get the feeling from the photo that it was likely taken somewhere in Europe.

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This one intrigued me so I made some enquiries. The code at the lower right was a clue, although I did have some assistance.

 

The links should give those interested something to keep you occupied in these times of 'lockdown'.

 

An interesting story. Frederic Rossel was an ex-Peugeot engineer who went into business for himself.

 

https://www.translatetheweb.com/?from=fr&to=en&ref=SERP&dl=en&rr=UC&a=https%3a%2f%2ffr.wikipedia.org%2fwiki%2fFr%C3%A9d%C3%A9ric_Rossel

 

I think the car was used in hill climbs rather than races - the main pic here is at Gaillon, but the second link is at Mont Ventoux

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b6917502v.item

 

http://tonton84.centerblog.net/rub-ANNEES-1900-COURSES-DE-COTES-AU-VENTOUX.html

 

And for those that can read Spanish - http://www.pilotos-muertos.com/2013/GruaErnest.html

 

Although there is an English version available - http://www.pilotos-muertos.com/2013/GruaErnest.html - which among other things confirms the Rossel was the winner at Gaillon in 1911.

 

Seems the Gaillon event was only 1 km (or 1,000 metres) - this one is not easy to read but does explain the criteria and details of the hill - https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/archive/article/september-1951/36/early-hill-climbs

 

For a comprehensive look at the history of European hill climbs see here - http://www.kolumbus.fi/leif.snellman/hcwg.htm

 

 

 

 

 

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How about a race day group. They appear to be from the same track, probably the same day, although I found them in different places. 

Again, I don't know where this was, but a few of the cars can be seen in more than one picture. I would guess from the tire sizes and a few other car details that it would likely be about '27 or '28. Tires on racing cars became smaller and more "balloon" rather quickly about that time. By 1929, few racing cars would have been running such skinny tires.

I love that tow truck! It appears to be a late '10s or early '20s large sedan modified.

 

 

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And how about something a little earlier. I can't remember where I found this one, but it was some time back.

Written on the photo is "Corona Speedway", and the year 1913. I am not sure if this is the famous Corona Road Race, or a track nearby. The city of Corona is famous for their road races in the mid '10s. They were one of the few cities in the US that allowed such races on city streets, and it was quite a big event for a few years. They ended after about 1916 in part due to the war efforts, as well as the tragic crash that killed Wild Bob Burman, his mechanician, and at least one spectator (online sources vary on the number of spectators killed or injured, I would need to dig out a reliable source to be sure of the count?).

Bob Burman had been crowned "King of the Racing Drivers about a year before his death.

By the time the Great War had ended, most people in the United States had agreed that serious races on public streets was not a good idea. While Europe and a few other places continue to do real road racing, the US has done most of its racing on the controlled situations of racing tracks.

 

And fitting my tendency towards bizarre humor, a bit of "historic" Corona to fight "present" Corona.

 

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Edited by wayne sheldon
spotted a typo :( (see edit history)
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A computer glitch fouled the posting, so rather than try to delete it, I switched to another photo.

It says "Overland Park". Don't know myself where it is, but they are sure kicking up the dust!

 

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Edited by wayne sheldon
Computer glitch (see edit history)
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Thanks Steve! 1975, I remember listening to the race on the garage radio while working on my Riley 4Port that would debut at Hershey in the Fall, hard to believe how fast 45 years have gone by. Bob 

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Junior in high school listening to my first Indy 500 on a new radio given to me for my birthday.  1964 and I had to hear that Eddie Sachs was killed.  Remember exactly where I was when I heard the news.  I remembered being deeply moved.  The 500 has a lot of memories for me and I feel very fortunate to have driven a Pace Car in 2002 for the start of the race.  Was given the lndiana license plate off the car too that said OLDS!  

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Those helmets did a lot of good!  :)

 

My car is the Caleb Bragg third from the left. It is an S74 Fiat that won the American Grand Prix in 1912 in Milwaukie, Wisconsin  I have raced it for many years and it is a blast to drive with 180 hp and 750 foot pounds of torque.  (from George Wingard current owner ...the engine compartment must be seen to be believed!)

 

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