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Time slips by and if you are like me, my Riviera doesn't get driven much at all.

I have Sta-bil in my tank but I believe the gasoline (or todays pumped corn cat piss) is well over a year old.

 

I see on the 'net this is alleged as a very bad thing to let happen. I have nightmares of gummed up lines and carb.

 

What are your thoughts? Should I drain the tank and lines immediately?

 

Thanks

 

 

 

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Drive your car and burn it out and put new gas in it.....It's very hard on the car to just sit that much without being driven. You need to drive it at

least every three months or so, weather permitting.

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If the engine seems to be running OK, I would not worry about it.  I use Sta-Bil 360 (kind of gold color - not red) for gas treatment when sitting and have not had a problem.

 

Prior to using that stuff, I got a chaulky white powdery corrosion on the inside surfaces of my gas cap when the car would sit with today's crap gas.

 

You can also look for an ethanol-free gas source near you. Popular for boats around here. But you need high octane for the Riv Nailhead... harder to find alcohol-free.

 

😎

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I fill up like ever other week (if not more) because these days I drive it more than I do my regular daily driver. 

 

It doesn't help that the gas tank on the Riv is so small and the fuel economy is so bad.

 

PWB - I think you should be fine.  It looks like gas with Stab-il can last up to 2 years. I would run it a little and fill it with new fresh premium gas to dilute the old gas, just in case. 

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I have been filling the tank with ethanol free gas before long storage.  Around here in Michigan it's usually about 90 octane. 

 

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Drain 5 to 10 gallons through the carburetor every week and be sure to jostle what is in the tank around pretty good.

 

Lots of other stuff on the car will benefit as well.

 

When I was servicing cars I had a customer who owned four old cars I quoted him a price of about $3,000 per year to drive each one 50 miles a week. It was pretty close to the cost of monkeying with stuck and deteriorated parts repaired due to sitting idle.

 

On a Saturday afternoon I told him I was going to a cruise night 50 miles away. He said "Here, take my '56 Eldorado and see if you can tell what's wrong." He drove me home the next morning after I had run the 100 mile round trip.  He still thinks I did something to repair it. Didn't touch a thing but the door handle and steering wheel.

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4 hours ago, PWB said:

Time slips by and if you are like me, my Riviera doesn't get driven much at all.

I have Sta-bil in my tank but I believe the gasoline (or todays pumped corn cat piss) is well over a year old.

 

I see on the 'net this is alleged as a very bad thing to let happen. I have nightmares of gummed up lines and carb.

 

What are your thoughts? Should I drain the tank and lines immediately?

 

Thanks

 

 

 

Two ways to test for water: 1. Drain about a half quart of gasoline in clear glass jar. If there is water in the gasoline the water will puddle on the bottom of the jar.

2. I also use water paste you smear on clean piece of wood. If water is in the gasoline the stick will change colors where you put the paste. I’ve had a bad time with water in my gasoline and ethanol problems with my small engine power equipment.

if you can get ethanol free gasoline where you live use it in your zRiviera. Boat marinas and small airports will let you buy small quantities.
Turbinator

 

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1 hour ago, 60FlatTop said:

Drain 5 to 10 gallons through the carburetor every week and be sure to jostle what is in the tank around pretty good.

 

Lots of other stuff on the car will benefit as well.

 

When I was servicing cars I had a customer who owned four old cars I quoted him a price of about $3,000 per year to drive each one 50 miles a week. It was pretty close to the cost of monkeying with stuck and deteriorated parts repaired due to sitting idle.

 

On a Saturday afternoon I told him I was going to a cruise night 50 miles away. He said "Here, take my '56 Eldorado and see if you can tell what's wrong." He drove me home the next morning after I had run the 100 mile round trip.  He still thinks I did something to repair it. Didn't touch a thing but the door handle and steering wheel.

 

Yep. Drive them—they were designed for that!

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Puregas.org 

 

Find that station near you that sells the ethanol free gas.  Most of the time it's the highest octane gas which is a bonus as well.  

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I always top mine off when it gets to about 1/2 full.  ;)

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I believe it was the BCA national meet in Denver where the Pre-war division had some very good tech sessions.

The subject of gas came up,  mainly what to do about ethanol gas.....however someone said that Marvel Mystery Oil worked as well as

Stab-il and had other benefits.    The discussion immediately shifted to the Marvel Oil and everyone raved about using it in gas and oil.

I started using it in my gas powered tools and equipment and the cars that are not driven regularly  can't say I have seen a difference but

I also have had no problems

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I have found that ethanol gas,  even with seafoam creates problems in my truck on long storage. 3 years in row I had to take the carburetors apart to clean the white powder in fuel bowls from the ethanol when it evaporates. You couldn't drive the truck it ran so bad. I would use ethanol free all year but they charge a dollar more a gallon around here. With social distancing I have not needed gas yet, will probably fill tank on the Riviera today. 

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21 hours ago, RivNut said:

Puregas.org 

 

Find that station near you that sells the ethanol free gas.  Most of the time it's the highest octane gas which is a bonus as well.  

 

But the ethanol free gas near me is 87 Octane. 

 

I cant put that pee in my tank!

 

Where do you guys get hi-octane ethanol free gas???  The nearest jet-fighter air base?

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

There are some Conoco stations around me that have the Premium no-ethanol gas.  Did you look for your city on the Pure-gas.org website?

 

https://www.pure-gas.org/

 

 

 

 

Edited by RivNut
added link (see edit history)

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22 hours ago, Turbinator said:

Two ways to test for water: 1. Drain about a half quart of gasoline in clear glass jar. If there is water in the gasoline the water will puddle on the bottom of the jar.

Yep.  This is the gas I drained from the tank of a wood chipper that I was just gifted because "It doesn't run."

 

water-in-gas.jpg.c083899c9288ebaac8173548af1965f2.jpg

 

Cleaned the cottage cheese out of the carb, filled it with new gas, and it runs like a top.

 

That's the second piece of equipment I've scored like that with the same problem.  Moral of the story: don't store your stuff outdoors.

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1 hour ago, PWB said:

 

But the ethanol free gas near me is 87 Octane. 

 

I cant put that pee in my tank!

 

Where do you guys get hi-octane ethanol free gas???  The nearest jet-fighter air base?

 

 

 

  Find a local oval track or drag strip and chances are you will find a service station in close proximity that carries high octane racing fuel. Marinas will often carry ethanol free fuel but not sure if you`ll find high octane there.

Tom Mooney

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OTOH, racing fuel is several times the cost of regular leaded gas -- which is substantially more expensive than unleaded as it is.  At some point, there's a cost/benefit ratio to be considered.

 

You can also buy Race Gas.

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Gasoline Mileage these daze

43237FAE-D454-4655-9106-146490DADEDE.jpeg

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2 hours ago, KongaMan said:

Yep.  This is the gas I drained from the tank of a wood chipper that I was just gifted because "It doesn't run."

 

water-in-gas.jpg.c083899c9288ebaac8173548af1965f2.jpg

 

Cleaned the cottage cheese out of the carb, filled it with new gas, and it runs like a top.

 

That's the second piece of equipment I've scored like that with the same problem.  Moral of the story: don't store your stuff outdoors.

I’ve read small airstrips in my area will sell ethanol free 100 octane gasoline to folks who bring an airplane or a container to the pump. I do not know how much the 100 octane is at the pump. Other entities that sell fuel and oil have non ethanol gasoline in quart cans that cost a fortune.

Ive heard the 10% ethanol gasoline has a stabilizer already in the mix. The fellow said if you add more stabilizer to the ethanol gasoline you make the situation worse. I could not tell if what the fellow said was fact or fiction regarding stabilizer.

Turbinator

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The lack of non-ethanol fuel must be a regional/area thing. Most of the gas stations in my area (central Wisconsin) have non-ethanol premium. In all of my travels through the years I have not really had a problem getting non-ethanol gas in the areas I have been through. The only place I ran into a problem was Iowa where I have heard they grow some corn. I always carry a couple of bottles of additive to handle a tank of ethanol laced fuel if that should be the case.

 

There is a small airport in a city that is 15 miles from where I live. I hear that they sell high octane leaded gas. It is expensive and most will go and get enough for 1/2 a tank and then mix with their normal gas.

 

Bill

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On small engines, if I have varnished up fuel in carburetor and fuel tank, I take carburetor apart, and remove fuel tank, I have a large pot I put on outside gas grille and mix lemon juice and water together, and boil for about 10 minutes, then put back together, now it runs like a dream. Next I am going to do the same to an automobile carburetor to try it.

 

Bob

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4 hours ago, Riviera63 said:

The lack of non-ethanol fuel must be a regional/area thing. Most of the gas stations in my area (central Wisconsin) have non-ethanol premium. In all of my travels through the years I have not really had a problem getting non-ethanol gas in the areas I have been through. The only place I ran into a problem was Iowa where I have heard they grow some corn. I always carry a couple of bottles of additive to handle a tank of ethanol laced fuel if that should be the case.

 

There is a small airport in a city that is 15 miles from where I live. I hear that they sell high octane leaded gas. It is expensive and most will go and get enough for 1/2 a tank and then mix with their normal gas.

 

Bill

Bill, your observation about the availability of non ethanol gasoline being regional is correct. I must drive at least 45 miles in any direction to find ethanol free gasoline. Central Maryland is not the most densely populated area in the US, but the air gets dirty at times. I suppose the suppliers believe the demand for non ethanol gasoline is low or the government prohibits sales in Central Maryland.

 

Some people believe adding more stabilizer to ethanol gasoline increases chance of more moisture. In most cases I keep the gasoline tanks on my small engines dry as possible especially over longer periods. My zRiviera has been in the garage without an engine for 3 months. I tested the gasoline for water 2 different ways for moisture. No moisture was found in the sample. I still may drain the tank and put in 5 gallons of fresh gasoline when I start the engine.

Turbinator

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Posted (edited)
On 6/19/2020 at 2:04 PM, PWB said:

Time slips by and if you are like me, my Riviera doesn't get driven much at all.

I have Sta-bil in my tank but I believe the gasoline (or todays pumped corn cat piss) is well over a year old.

 

I see on the 'net this is alleged as a very bad thing to let happen. I have nightmares of gummed up lines and carb.

 

What are your thoughts? Should I drain the tank and lines immediately?

 

Thanks

 

 

 

I'll probably be chastised for saying this but my personal experience has been I have not had issues with year old gas other than a barely noticeable drop in performance or idle quality. There is so much hatred written out there on 10% ethanol gas I just haven't experienced it in anything larger than a weed whacker or chainsaw engine which are very sensitive to age of gas and believe me I have a lot of gas engine equipment.

I quit using Stabil 10-15 years ago because in "my experience" it doesn't perform the miracle work as folks like to think. I know people that have had more trouble and they use Stabil in everything. There are variables that affect how well a vehicle or piece of equipment will deal with old gas.

 

Not sure how much gas is in your tank but you could get a cheap electric pump and stick a hose in the filler neck and pump most of the fuel out. But then you have to dispose of it and that can be a problem and cost especially if you have 2 or 3 5 gal cans but otherwise I'd try and run the car as-is and if it runs OK drive out the old gas.    

Edited by JZRIV (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, JZRIV said:

I quit using Stabil 10-15 years ago because in "my experience" it doesn't perform the miracle work as folks like to think.

 

x2.

 

I run all of my outdoor equipment dry at the end of the season, with the exception of my snowblower (because that season never ends here...) Actually, the snowblower has a pretty large tank, so I simply close the petcock and run the carb dry.  Then I top off the tank with new gas before I run it again.  I fill my boat (Mercruiser I/O) and classic cars as full as I can (with non-ethanol gas) at the end of the season  to leave as little air space as possible to minimize opportunity for condensation to occur.  No Sta-Bil, no issues.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks all for the input.

 

Indeed, my car was idling horribly as I posted the symptom here over a year ago.

 

I couldn't find anything wrong and could only guess it was old fuel going bad.

 

Even some fresh fuels are already low quality from the get go.

 

At least prices now are below the stratosphere.

 

 

 

 

Edited by PWB (see edit history)

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