Seafoam65

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Seafoam65 last won the day on July 2 2018

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About Seafoam65

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    Winston McCollum #13242
  • Birthday 02/23/1952

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Plano, Tx.
  • Interests:
    Car hobby, boating and fishing

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  • Biography
    Born 1952......Own several cars that I show and drive....1965 buick Riviera, 1969 GTO Judge convertible, 1970 Chevelle SS396 hardtop, 1979 Trans Am, 2013 Mustang, 2010 Camaro .....BBA from University of Texas 1975, Car repair business owner in Plano, Tx. since 1975. My Dad bought a 65 Riviera brand new in September 64, I learned to drive in Dad's 65 Riviera in 1967.....finally bought my own in 2013

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  1. I mailed a check to a vendor on May 20 who is located 5 miles from me and he hasn't received it yet.......the US government in action!
  2. After all the above comments I went out to my GTO and ran my fingers through the carpet fibers. Then I ran my fingers through the carpet fibers on the perfect unmolested original carpet in my 65 Riviera. There was ABSOLUTELY NO CRUNCHING OR STIFFNESS in the GTO's spray died carpets and ABSOLUTELY NO DIFFERENCE in the texture, stiffness or softness of the two carpets. CASE CLOSED......we are done now. Having been in the car repair business for 47 years, I have found that the main difference between the guy who works on his cars on weekends and the guy who works on cars 7 days a week is that the part time hobbyist will always fixate on the most difficult way to accomplish the job in question and will reject the simple effective way every single time. Recent examples on this forum are fighting speed nuts and barrel clips to install a nameplate on a fender when it could be glued on in ten seconds, or tearing the entire dash out of a car to change the heater core, rejecting taking it out from the engine side. Now we are ripping out interiors to remove the carpet and then mixing up a batch of RIT dye to dye the carpet, then reinstalling the carpet and interior, when it could be masked and spray dyed in about twenty minutes with absolutely perfect results. All of this reminds me of the old Texas Aggie joke inquiring how many Aggies does it take to change a light bulb? Answer: 5 1 to stand on the ladder and hold the bulb, and 4 to pick up the occupied ladder and rotate it.
  3. The brand is SEM and the part no. for black is 15013. My O'reilly's doesn't keep it on the shelf but can get it from the warehouse in a couple of hours. On my GTO the carpet was like new other than the color had faded to purple due to sun exposure at car shows with the top down on the car. Generally I never put the top up on my GTO, I just have a car cover over it when not driving it. Sometimes I have gone several years without putting it up. I can honestly say that the carpet in the GTO looks better than it did when I first installed it back in the 90's......the black color of the carpet was never that deep and vibrant even when it was new. An added bonus was that the color of the carpet strips on the bottom of the front door panels never matched the main carpet exactly......now it does match and it really looks great.
  4. Nope......the carpet is soft and pliable and looks fantastic with the O'reilly's fabric dye.
  5. The fabric dye that O'reilly's sells is great for carpet......I used it on the faded black carpet in my GTO and it looks better now than when the carpet in the car was brand new.
  6. You will need to use yellow paint.....I used yellow paint in an aerosol can....sprayed a wet coat on a piece of sheet metal then stuck the stamp in the paint while it was still wet and stamped the compressor with it. The correct location on a 65 is on the passenger side top and side of the compressor between the black and silver Frigidaire decal and the black and orange CAUTION decal below it. The correct positioning of the stamp would be so that you can read it straight up and down when looking at it while standing in front of the side of the passenger fender.
  7. Be aware that speed nuts are very prone to strip out on the stud so that when you go to remove them later, they just spin and won't come off. If that happens at a later date, the fender would have to come off to remove the emblem....another reason why the ten second weatherstrip adhesive method is the way to go.The car makers figured that out 40 years ago.....all emblems on cars are held on by adhesive now.
  8. My 70 Chevelle SS 396 came with them, it has four.....two for the lap belts and two for the shoulder harness belts
  9. If that balancer hasn't ruined the crankshaft already it soon will.........don't drive it anymore till you tear it down, inspect the crank snout and key and replace with a good balancer.
  10. How many times do I have to say this.....all you have to do is put a dab of 3M yellow weatherstrip adhesive on each stud of the emblem and put it on..........allow 24 hours for the adhesive to set before driving the car......takes about ten seconds to do. The emblems on my GTO have been held onto the fenders this way for 47 years so far.
  11. The main competitor was the Pontiac Grand Prix........back then if you were a Ford guy you bought a T-bird no matter what. GM guys had to choose between the Grand Prix and the Riviera......the Grand Prix won out with more sales than the Riviera. People who bought Fords in 1963 were not going to switch to GM......if the management of GM thought the Riviera was going to steal sales from the Thunderbird, they were kidding themselves.......sales of the T-Bird in 63, 64, and 65 sailed right along just as in 60, 61 and 62..
  12. They have two nipples on them, one on each end of the part. Usually they are round in shape........and have one nipple going to the intake vacuum hose and one on the opposite side of the valve going to the hose for the trunk release. Inside them is a check valve which allows vacuum to flow in one direction only. They usually were made of plastic, but I have seen metal ones on older cars. On some GM cars the valve is located right next to the vacuum reservoir, on others it is located right at the intake manifold vacuum nipple.........It will definitely be in one of those two places. I'm not sure what they did on the 65 riviera as my car doesn't have that option. The same kind of check valve was used on the A/C controls vacuum feed hose so that when you accelerate the engine and vacuum drops to zero, the A/C doesn't blow out the defroster.
  13. You are apparently missing the vacuum check valve at the intake manifold. without a working vacuum check valve in the system, all the vacuum bleeds into the intake manifold the moment you shut off the engine. The reservoir is of no use without a working check valve in the system.
  14. Tom, the spring in your picture is flatter than the one on my car......the one on Steve's car is flat as a pancake which is why his horn doesn't work.By the way, I think it may be possible to bend the part to make it useable again if the metal still has it's tensile strength.....it's worth a try.