Laughing Coyote

1933 Pierce arrow 836 7 pass

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Nice car, seems to have represented all four corners of the country plus most of Canada during it's life.

I don't think the "period correct" paint sceme will help.¬†ūüėĄ

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Nice car, but a little brightly lit.  

 

The screws in the window sills were not a good idea of someone's. 

 

Nice car though !!!

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3 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

Nice car, but a little brightly lit.  

 

The screws in the window sills were not a good idea of someone's. 

 

Nice car though !!!


 

John, read carefully........the ad says period correct colors..............obviously your mistaken. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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What's with the leather front seat? It's a sedan, not a limousine, right?

 

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If that car was $28,000 or even $38,000, would you guys be making fun of it?

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4 hours ago, edinmass said:


 

John, read carefully........the ad says period correct colors..............obviously your mistaken. 

Sorry my mistake - :)

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If only they had matched the paint color with the blue broadcloth, painted the wood spokes and fitted black wall tires, it would look very elegant and consistent with the taste of its era.   "Less is more."

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If I were to see any pre-war car with a similar bright and dark color scheme, I would immediately assume that it was rodded.  It's just the way my mind interprets it and in this case my interpretation was be wrong.

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1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

If that car was $28,000 or even $38,000, would you guys be making fun of it?


My comment was the ‚Äúfactory correct colors‚ÄĚ.............I was not making fun of it. As a Pierce Arrow owner, and representative of the marque, the color comment is so far off the mark, it bothers me. I could comment endlessly on the car just from the photos, but I it‚Äôs not my job to to either help or hurt it‚Äôs sale. As far as price, to each his own..

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1 hour ago, 58L-Y8 said:

If only they had matched the paint color with the blue broadcloth, painted the wood spokes and fitted black wall tires, it would look very elegant and consistent with the taste of its era.   "Less is more."

I have a very original, low mileage 1933 Auburn sedan with natural / not painted spokes (and a dark blue exterior).  @edinmass I’m curious, do you know, were all Pierce wood spokes painted in 1933?

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Yes, ALL Pierce wooden wheels were painted when new, there is no proof that they ever used stained or natural finish wood.

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Thanks Ed!  Now I’m curious about my Auburn.  ...time for some research.

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Interesting car, but he is asking a premium price.  Lots of work to bring it back to its original glory.  In 1933 Graham had optional white wall tires, looks like Pierce did also. 

 

image.png.1df2a6b0e3afbfeb255a8838946fb52a.png

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16 hours ago, bryankazmer said:

I've not seen color-coordinated roof insert fabric before

Actually, color coded/keyed roof inserts were a thing in the 1932-ish to 1936-ish time period - as cars were becoming more "modern," 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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Years ago I saw text from a serious historian, museum curator. He described wanting ONLY 100% original untouched cars for his museum. It was because restored cars always seem to reflect (include?) colors, styles and small fashion elements from the time they were restored. 

 

However much people seem to like "old" cars, it is way too common to fix them to look like whatever is currently in the showroom when the work is being done. ("Make it look new again") 

 

These tiny elements of design seem to be invisible until the finished product is viewed many decades later. 

Kinda like looking at pictures of yourself from high school. "Did I really dress that way??" 

 

During the 1970s I remember the 57 Thunderbirds all had narrow whitewalls.

At the same time the 61-67 Lincoln convertibles all had 'classic' wide whitewalls. 

Both in opposition of what was original equipment. . . . .

 

Maybe its not about history, its only about standing out?

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I agree with m-mman completely.  We see the same thing in Victorian houses, particularly in the SF Bay area where there are so many.  Starting in the 70's, the "painted ladies" boom started with all kinds of garish paint schemes, like this:

 

victorian_painted_lady-resized-600.png.3453124eab541f2418fbf1f917e6406b.png

 

Whereas, when built, most of these houses had very somber, earth tone schemes (or were simply mono-tone), like this:

 

victorian_house_painted_exterior-resized-600.png.8bd83bed73c18066610a0ca2ff0a1c94.png

 

This PA reminds me of the same phenomenon.

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I can't comment on whether or not the car is correct.  While the colors are not my style (at all!) The car certainly has a good presence.  Paint is not a minor matter but if you were willing and able to tear the exterior apart and respray it, say, monochromatic dark blue or dark gray, even with the whitewalls and wood spokes,  it would look much better.  Just my opinion. 

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Does it matter if the same colors are on an open car?

 Maybe if we went away from having to have the original colors that many to me are very drab looking. With all the browns and tan colored cars out there for an example you not attracting a younger following who like the brighter colors to be noticed. How many auto manufactures today have brown or tan colors on their chart and just try and sell a used brown car.  

If you want to attract the new generation you are not going to do it with many of the ugly colors that are authentic. 

  Just my thoughts on color and and opening another can of worms.  
14344.jpg

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)

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52 minutes ago, Joe in Canada said:
 

Does it matter if the same colors are on an open car?

 Maybe if we went away from having to have the original colors that many to me are very drab looking. With all the browns and tan colored cars out there for an example you not attracting a younger following who like the brighter colors to be noticed. How many auto manufactures today have brown or tan colors on their chart and just try and sell a used brown car.  

If you want to attract the new generation you are not going to do it with many of the ugly colors that are authentic. 

  Just my thoughts on color and and opening another can of worms.  
14344.jpg

Better blues on this Packard - the wheels are a bit brightly lit and the car would probably be better served with the wheels being the darker blue, but otherwise "period".  The painted chassis is a nice touch.

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I think we only have slides of our 1931 Cadillac Town Sedan, though it was done to match a factory magazine illustration and basically looked like this excepting factory painted metal sidemount covers.

 

download.jpg.367511373b8988714c6d1e24024aec1e.jpg

 

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Maybe  the  color would  look  better if  it  was  a little softer.

IMG_0787.JPG

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I'm kinda partial to this 1929 Chrysler roadster blue combination....

roadster.jpg

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4 hours ago, Joe in Canada said:

Does it matter if the same colors are on an open car?

Yes, I think it does. An open car is expected to flashier and brighter.  An open car is a "Look at me!" type of car

Any sedan or closed car is expected to be more conservative. Sedans were commonly equipped with shades to hide the occupants. . . . .

 

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