suchan

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Everything posted by suchan

  1. https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1937-chrysler-imperial/ Beautiful BIG 7 pass sedan.
  2. Clean, green coupe:https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1940-buick-coupe-3-speed/ Not sure if the green leather upholstery was a factory option, but a nice looking car with sidemounts. Bid's already over $13K.
  3. Even if the dealer is clueless, you'd think the owner could've given some details for the ad. Wiki-info doesn't cut it. Now that Luke mentions it, the dash is a strange hodgepodge of circular and linear, like Packard wanted to go with the trend, but couldn't quite bring themselves to give up the round speedo. Design by committee? I thought at first it might be a scam, but maybe it's just a bad ad.
  4. I think we've whipped this dead horse sufficiently. Folks have been putting radials on cars that were delivered on bias ply tires for a long time. I've been doing it myself for 40 years without a problem. The only difference I noticed is that I got fewer flats and the tires handled and rode better. Here's a tire, 6.50-16, the size came originally came on '39 Specials, $130, that would be fine for a spare, or a set to drive on until a restoration is finished and the owner chooses (or not) to spring for a set of Cokers or Diamondbacks: https://www.millertire.com/products/truck-tires/antique-truck-tires/6-50-16/6-50-16-deestone-hwy-rib/
  5. Tubeless tires, radial or otherwise, will seal on any modern-style solid rim. I think the main argument put forward against radials is that they can place more lateral stress on old rims in cornering, and if your rims are in poor condition, or you drive your car beyond its capabilities, they may fail. Tubes should only be used if the rims aren't airtight (wire wheels, etc.). Instead of added security, using tubes when they're not needed just introduces another unnecessary source of problems.
  6. Looks like a nice car at a fair asking price. Put one of those great factory two-tone paint jobs on it, and head for the car show. Or better yet, buy the car, ask the seller to hold it until August, check out Hot August Nights, and drive it home!
  7. Just a good ol' car. C'mon, somebody needs this!
  8. Specials have low gear ratios as it sits. Buying undersize tires just exacerbates the problem with high engine speed, and to my eye, it looks weird. If you want some relatively low cost tires to roll on, how about this :https://www.tirebuyer.com/tires/size/205-80-16 Tall, narrow tires are pretty much the domain of antique car and truck specialty shops nowadays, and if you're not concerned about "old-timey" appearance, truck shops offer MUCH better prices. There's an ongoing conversation about radials, but I've used them on my '38 Buicks and my '37 LaSalle (no tubes, of course), and they work great, handle better and roll smoother than bias ply.
  9. We used to live in that part of Nevada, East of Reno, and I think I saw this car before it was "dealt with". It wasn't too far gone to restore, but it would've taken a very dedicated buyer to see its potential. Individual tastes aside, the seller is taking a huge loss at the asking price. Check out those driving lights!
  10. "Original" has gained some range in its meaning, like "organic" foods. Nowadays, it means the owner hasn't gotten around to dropping in a small block Chevy or installing a Mustang II front end. For a 90-year-old car, this one is as original as most buyers would expect. Looks like a nice car for the asking price, but I think Franklins are generally undervalued.
  11. https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1928-plymouth-model-q-four-door-sedan/ Nice car, needs re-commissioning.
  12. Good asking price for a nice 120 coupe. Handsome car.
  13. I looked for an interesting '38 Century for months before I bought my '37 LaSalle, and now they're coming out of the woodwork! Yeah, let's hear about the rust, and see some engine/underside pics. I've never seen even a picture of a 2 dr Century before, either than sales brochures. Looks like somebody found a big box of bumper/radiator guards at the swap meet. I'm sure the buyer will find a ready market for the extras.
  14. If you click on the link to eBay, you're re-directed to a '51 Packard of the same general body style, but in MUCH better condition. The car in the original listing needs everything.
  15. $18K asking, and it'll be the center of attention at every car show. Sounds like a bargain to me. Not sure I consider the bodywork overall as beautiful, but it's definitely striking, and that nose is spectacular.
  16. Not mine, unfortunately. Pretty, clean car. A buddy had one years ago. Fun to drive, quick (for a mid-50's wagon). https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1955-buick-century-5/
  17. Nice car. And it's got the "Chevron" dash! Not sure about the supposed rarity, though. I don't go to that many shows, and I've seen a couple of them. Just lucky, I guess. Fair asking price.
  18. Concours DeLemons material. Paint it bright yellow with flames down the fenders!
  19. Lots of question marks (not running, sitting for 30 years), but undeniably a cool car and reasonable asking price. I doubt that's original paint, and that should give the buyer a little more leverage.
  20. At least they didn't call it a barn find. I can see it now: "featured marque: six-cylinder Packard sedans of the '20's!". I didn't know they made Non-Skid tires that big.
  21. Fun car at a good price. Someone needs to jump on it.
  22. Believe what I tell you, not what you see...I guess now the term "gaslight" not only applies to the brass era cars.
  23. I had the same problem with a 38-41. Windshield gaskets had been bad for some time, and the rust at the the top of the dash held it tight. Could be under the brown gunk was smeared up there in an effort to limit/ conceal some rust? And coincidentally those little screws?