Dynaflash8

Is hobby interest in pre-WWII cars Dying?

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Posted (edited)
50 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

Different strokes, to me color is about the least important variable in my choice. Unless it is completely jarring I am much more concerned with many things other than color. I agree that the right color can make a given car look better, but rarely will it sway me one way or another when considering a purchase.

A couple of times I have bought cars that were in a color I thought ugly. But over time they grew on me and in one case is now my preference.

 

Greg in Canada

1966%20Mustang%20GT%20Coupe%2072.jpg

 

 

Great little Mustang! We had this one in the shop and I really liked the color--in fact, I almost thought it was the same car, but ours was not a GT. It was, however, a nice original, untouched V8 coupe from down south. We had people fighting over it.

 

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23 minutes ago, TerryB said:

 In 1970, the cutoff was 1945, with about 40 years to choose from and pretty much all candidates were pre WWII era.  Even the 1955-57 Chevy models were still mostly just well used old cars at that time.

 

That's a very good point. The rolling cut-off for at least the AACA's "antique" classification is constantly adding new cars to the mix. To some, that's a good thing, but to many hobbyists, there's a definite point where a car doesn't really seem like an "old" car. I'll admit that I have found myself questioning some of the attendees at some meets simply because the cars are those I grew up with and don't really seem like they should be collectable cars. They're just regular cars. However, then I think about it and realize I'm nearly 50 years old--some of those "late model" cars that don't seem all that old are actually older than our 1930 Model A was when I was enjoying it as a kid!

 

I'm admitting my bias and have to remember to poke myself sometimes when it creeps into my thoughts. I think we all have it in some way or another. I've learned that it's OK to like whatever you like as long as you like it. The minute it stops being fun, don't do it anymore. If you want a 1985 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera sedan, well, I'm not going to stop you or think less of you. Have fun!

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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This is about as far back as I will go for a driver. Pre Viet Nam War. My brother and I learned to drive in a '38 Nash LaFayette back in the 60's that my grandpa gave to him.

 The majority of my teen year cars were mid 50's Ford products back as far as a 49 Meteor.  A 59 Cadillac, then a 63 Eldorado convertible when I was 17.I really wanted a Mustang and got a 1967 by 1972.

  By then (72-73) the late 60's muscle cars were getting rusty and cheap enough for me to afford after lusting after them in Hot Rod magazines a few years earlier.

Now I'm ready to drive 70's full size luxo barges.

image2.jpeg

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6 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

That's a very good point. The rolling cut-off for at least the AACA's "antique" classification is constantly adding new cars to the mix. To some, that's a good thing, but to many hobbyists, there's a definite point where a car doesn't really seem like an "old" car. I'll admit that I have found myself questioning some of the attendees at some meets simply because the cars are those I grew up with and don't really seem like they should be collectable cars. They're just regular cars. However, then I think about it and realize I'm nearly 50 years old--some of those "late model" cars that don't seem all that old are actually older than our 1930 Model A was when I was enjoying it as a kid!

 

I'm admitting my bias and have to remember to poke myself sometimes when it creeps into my thoughts. I think we all have it in some way or another. I've learned that it's OK to like whatever you like as long as you like it. The minute it stops being fun, don't do it anymore. If you want a 1985 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera sedan, well, I'm not going to stop you or think less of you. Have fun!

 

When I started having the 1985 judged, many folks called it a "late-model" without any artifice. Now folks in the same hobby only call it a late model to tease me. Everything is relative and everything changes over time—the NCRS initially planned to never judge any car newer than 1962.

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Posted (edited)

The other advantage to a border line used car / hobby car is price. When I decided I needed to rejoin the ranks of TVR owners after a 20 year pause I was shocked by how expensive the 1960's cars had become. I ended up with a 1974 because that was simply the only one I  could by then afford. A 1960's example like I had owned in the past were easily twice as expensive and in many ways inferior to the 1973 and up , improved chassis cars. The early cars have charm in abundance, but are mechanically frail. If prices were even I would chose charm over practicality, but I am not going to pay double for charm.

 

Greg in Canada

 

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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A '39 Buick has a lot of personality to the front styling; like a bugeye sprite.

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In reference to what Matt said about 30 years ago she and I went to an auction by Kruse  Auctions not too from from our home.  As we were walking through the lot of cars to be auctioned she remarked that to her this lot seemed like the cars the bidders drove to the auction to bid on the real Old Cars.

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13 hours ago, j3studio said:

Auburn 851 Speedster in either (I believe) Empress Beige or Palm Beach Tan,

Are you sure that isn't "Cigarette Cream"?

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13 minutes ago, Dynaflash8 said:

Are you sure that isn't "Cigarette Cream"?

Ya, cigarette cream.  You see a dozen speedsters painted 'cigarette cream and they are all a different color.   40% of speedsters are red ,  40% are cream.  the last 20% are all other colors.  

When at the ACD reunion, I don't want to see my self going the other way.  

IMG_4425_3708 copy.jpg

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11 hours ago, mike6024 said:

A '39 Buick has a lot of personality to the front styling; like a bugeye sprite.

Beauty is to the beholder.  Personally, I have thought my entire life (80 years) that the front styling of a 1939 Buick was the most beautiful on any car ever built, but only so long as it had the optional front fender lights.  Without them, the styling is homely.  Now that is what is in my minds eye.  A log more Buick enthusiasts over my lifetime think the 1938 Buick is the most handsome.  I always imagined they looked mean instead of pretty.  A 1935-36 Auburn speedster or convertibile coupe is beautiful, but a sedan definitely is not.  I welcome anybody to differ with my "minds eye".  The large majority of collectors have a different view of auto styling that appeals to them.  A 1941 Buick looks strong to me, like the B-27 Flying Fortress. 

 

As for newer cars into the hobby, even an old guy can appreciate them.  I enjoy AACA National Tours more than shows anymore.  So I've tried to have a car to cover every tour except the Vintage and Reliability Tours.  I'm not enough of a mechanic to deal with earlier cars.  The best Buicks we ever had in hour family were the 1991-2005 Buick LeSabre and Park Avenue.  My Dad and I owned six of them (4 were Park Avenues).  So, when I wanted a tour car that could go anywhere, modern mechanics could still work on, and it didn't need a trailer to attend tours 1100 miles away from home, I looked for a 1991-1994 Park Avenue (25 years).  I found a 1991 with only 3,061 verified original miles on it.  I had to buy new tires, and that's all.  I drove it to the AACA National Meet without even cleaning the engine or polishing it and won a 1st Junior.  It feels pretty much like the 2005 Park Avenue I turned in on a new (and hated) 2017 Buick.  So, at 80 years old, it fills my need now.  In no way is it as beautiful as my 1939 or 1941 Buicks, but it doesn't have babbit bearings, no air, or even a points & condenser distributor like my two pre-war Buicks either.  It's a stretch to call the Park Avenue an antique, I agree, but AACA offers something for everybody except a local chapter in this end of the earth Sebring, FL where I unfortunately chose to live out my retirement.  Collecting antique cars is not ALL ABOUT driving them 75 miles an hour down the Interstate.  I drive the old cars on tours when I trailer them there, and within a 100 miles radius of home, but unfortunately there is not much to do withing 100 miles of here.....two lane, 60 mph, tractor trailer truck loaded east-west roads.  I decided to sell the two '39 Buick convertibles because they can do the same thing the sedan can do and they require a closed trailer for long hauls to AACA National Tours.  I'm thinking of getting an aluminum open trailer with a shield on the front, but I'm waiting to see how putting in a new heart valve goes.

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Late customer of ours was not allowed to put the car he was driving on the show field at  one of the early Hershey meets because it was "too new".  Did I mention he was driving a '36 Auburn Speedster?  Some time in the early 1980's we were asked by the Hershey region to remove a sign from our flea market stand advertising '64 XKE parts because they were too new. Time marches on.

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56 minutes ago, Dynaflash8 said:

Are you sure that isn't "Cigarette Cream"?

 

No. That's why I said "I believe." I don't trust my ability to match the old paint charts to the colors I am seeing.

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36 minutes ago, Curti said:

When at the ACD reunion, I don't want to see my self going the other way. 

 

If I had an 851, this would be the last of my considerations …

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In 1963 my Dad and I went to the Watkins Glen Grand Prix. There was a concours in the park downtown. The two cars I remember were a Pierce-Arrow Silver Arrow and a Studebaker Avanti. I liked them both.

But I was young and enjoyed them the way a child would.

 

Oh, we drove down in the style of the day, too.

1549028596_002(3).jpg.4d1cc63eb9cb18568a32af43d28ab7ee.jpg

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1 hour ago, Dynaflash8 said:

Beauty is to the beholder.  Personally, I have thought my entire life (80 years) that the front styling of a 1939 Buick was the most beautiful on any car ever built, but only so long as it had the optional front fender lights.  Without them, the styling is homely.  Now that is what is in my minds eye.  A log more Buick enthusiasts over my lifetime think the 1938 Buick is the most handsome.  I always imagined they looked mean instead of pretty.  A 1935-36 Auburn speedster or convertibile coupe is beautiful, but a sedan definitely is not.  I welcome anybody to differ with my "minds eye".  The large majority of collectors have a different view of auto styling that appeals to them.  A 1941 Buick looks strong to me, like the B-27 Flying Fortress. 

 

As for newer cars into the hobby, even an old guy can appreciate them.  I enjoy AACA National Tours more than shows anymore.  So I've tried to have a car to cover every tour except the Vintage and Reliability Tours.  I'm not enough of a mechanic to deal with earlier cars.  The best Buicks we ever had in hour family were the 1991-2005 Buick LeSabre and Park Avenue.  My Dad and I owned six of them (4 were Park Avenues).  So, when I wanted a tour car that could go anywhere, modern mechanics could still work on, and it didn't need a trailer to attend tours 1100 miles away from home, I looked for a 1991-1994 Park Avenue (25 years).  I found a 1991 with only 3,061 verified original miles on it.  I had to buy new tires, and that's all.  I drove it to the AACA National Meet without even cleaning the engine or polishing it and won a 1st Junior.  It feels pretty much like the 2005 Park Avenue I turned in on a new (and hated) 2017 Buick.  So, at 80 years old, it fills my need now.  In no way is it as beautiful as my 1939 or 1941 Buicks, but it doesn't have babbit bearings, no air, or even a points & condenser distributor like my two pre-war Buicks either.  It's a stretch to call the Park Avenue an antique, I agree, but AACA offers something for everybody except a local chapter in this end of the earth Sebring, FL where I unfortunately chose to live out my retirement.  Collecting antique cars is not ALL ABOUT driving them 75 miles an hour down the Interstate.  I drive the old cars on tours when I trailer them there, and within a 100 miles radius of home, but unfortunately there is not much to do withing 100 miles of here.....two lane, 60 mph, tractor trailer truck loaded east-west roads.  I decided to sell the two '39 Buick convertibles because they can do the same thing the sedan can do and they require a closed trailer for long hauls to AACA National Tours.  I'm thinking of getting an aluminum open trailer with a shield on the front, but I'm waiting to see how putting in a new heart valve goes.

 

Earl, are 100% correct, and I also feel that the 1939 was one of the best looking cars made, for that part most (the LaSalle's were a little behind the curve, my opinion)of the GM line in 1939 was beautiful and presented the art-deco era so well, it was the end of that era of styling, same could be said for the 1960 GM designs. A 39 Buick is one my bucket list cars, My father had a 39 Pontiac that was used as a back round car in the film the "Godfather" we never were able to find it, but when that film was made those cars were only 20 to 25 years old, so pretty much used cars

 

 In 1982 I was 24 years old  and remember showing up to local AACA region event with a 59 Impala, and one of the active voices in the club told me " you got yourself nice used car."  Turn the clock ahead to 2005  the same guy shows up with a nice low mileage late 1980's Oldsmobile, I guess everything goes full circle.

 

I wish you a lot of luck with the valve job on your heart, later today when I get some more time I will send you a PM on the open trailer from my experience.   

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Posted (edited)

Like 1932, 1939 was a great year for design, agree especially so for GM.  Love the Caddys and mini-cad look of Chevy for 39 as well as Buick.  Really a zenith for art deco design in cars.

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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When I was a kid and close to driving age my dad was looking at one of those “bathtub” Nash autos as his next car.  His brother had bought one at a local used car dealer and the dealer had another that my dad was going to inspect.  When we got to the dealership I was terrified that my dad was going to buy this one and I would be stuck driving this UGLY car around during my high school days.  My personal disaster was averted when dad decided not to buy it.  Fast forward to today and I think it would be one cool ride to have!  Lots of fine cars and stories in the car world.  Then there was the time I passed on a nice TR3.....

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Is interest in pre war cars fading? Here are fifty Pierce Arrows on tour this week in the mid west. 

A4792D89-2966-41B2-A4B2-8B474F3B7F3B.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

Hardscrabble region of the HCCA will have its very first tour June 22. Open to all HCCA eligible cars and other cars up to 1932. Is interest dying? Certainly not.

Edited by Brass is Best (see edit history)
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10 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Is interest in pre war cars fading? Here are fifty Pierce Arrows on tour this week in the mid west. 

Edinmass,

    I would say the answer is a big  NOPE!  

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We have thirteen 100+ year old cars registered for the annual HCCA KISS one & two cylinder car tour next week in McMinnville OR.  

Many of the KISS Tour participants are also registered for the Modoc CA tour the following week.

 

So, I would say that interest is definitely not fading. 

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48 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Is interest in pre war cars fading? Here are fifty Pierce Arrows on tour this week in the mid west. 

A4792D89-2966-41B2-A4B2-8B474F3B7F3B.jpeg

 

Man o Man, if one only had the resources to be a part of that.....auto nirvana ! And I bet the surrounding roads are old car friendly as well !  We can all dream. Down to the lotto store for me.

 

Greg in Canada

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, John348 said:

In 1982 I was 24 years old  and remember showing up to local AACA region event with a 59 Impala, and one of the active voices in the club told me " you got yourself nice used car."

I heard that "used car" thing many times with my 39 Buick sedan back in the 1960's in Baltimore, it almost regurgitated me.  When I was elected President of AACA in 2004 I had to make a speech in Philadelphia at the Annual Convention.  In that speech I declared the term "used car" as an dirty word in AACA, but I don't think enough people were listening. 😀

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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56 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Is interest in pre war cars fading? Here are fifty Pierce Arrows on tour this week in the mid west. 

A4792D89-2966-41B2-A4B2-8B474F3B7F3B.jpeg

 

Thanks for the glorious pic, Ed.

I just wish I could be out there with my PAS family enjoying the friendship, the cars, the tours and food.  :)

 

 

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1 hour ago, Dynaflash8 said:

I heard that "used car" thing many times with my 39 Buick sedan back in the 1960's in Baltimore, it almost regurgitated me.  When I was elected President of AACA in 2004 I had to make a speech in Philadelphia at the Annual Convention.  In that speech I declared the term "used car" as an dirty word in AACA, but I don't think enough people were listening. 😀

 

I recall the speech,  I was there that year

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

Is interest in pre-war cars fading?  Here are fifty Pierce Arrows on tour this week in the mid west. 

 

It's encouraging that clubs like that remain active, and the

old cars are getting out on the road.  However, to answer

whether interest in pre-war cars remains strong, we have

to consider the bigger picture.  I hope the answer is positive:

 

---Is the Pierce Arrow Society bigger than it was 20 and 30 years ago?

---Do more Pierces get out to national meets?

---Are as many Pierces actively driven by members compared to then?

---Are other clubs, such as those for Stutz, Marmon, Packard, Elgin,

     Hudson-Essex-Terraplane, etc. growing and getting new, younger members?

 

I hear the brass-era contingent are holding their own.  Are there any

other encouraging signs to report?

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