Dynaflash8

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Dynaflash8 last won the day on February 24 2019

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About Dynaflash8

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    '39 Buick Team Member
  • Birthday 10/19/1938

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    Served 15 years on AACA Board, National President 2005

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  1. Unfortunately I couldn't find anybody, at the time it was advertised, to go and look at it for me. I was highly interested. The late former owner was a member of the Buick Club of America and I think before he got sick the car was probably, basically, a restored car. Then, I understand, it sat in a garage for six years and varmints got into it.
  2. This sure a shame that this car can't be saved, but as the old man used to say, "you can't save them all." This model is the only Buick I ever wanted and never was able to acquire at a price I could afford..............just one time when I was young and had no money.......$125 intact in the area of Odenton and Fort Meade, MD. I've had over sixty old and new Buicks in my 81 years. Earl Beauchamp, Past National President AACA, BCA #55. Those side moldings are extremely important and extremely hard to find. Good luck.
  3. You can look in the COKER catalog, but wait, I'll go out to my office and check it....wait....the 2019 Catalog says 3 1/4 inches wide. I bought them in 2018, but I don't suppose they were any wider then. They are dismounted and out in my back garage. I had them mounted on 49 Buick rims. Earl
  4. Twenty-one months ago I purchased five new 820R15 radial witewall COKER tires for my 1941 Buick Roadmaster. I drove it on one CCCA Tour (200 miles round trip) and then put it into a restoration shop. After it was restored I drove it on another CCCA Tour of 480 miles, and then decided I didn't like the look of radials. These are COKER AMERICAN CLASSIC tires. I put the car into a different local shop to rebuild the front end and the entire brake system. The car only has 59K original miles on it, but I had the parts and wanted to make it as close to new condition as possible. I probably didn't need to do any of this work, but I wanted a "new" 1941 Bu ick Roadmaster. Crazy? Heck, I'm 81 years old, why save those NOS parts? When I did that I went back to COKER and bought five original-style new 7.00x15 bias tires. Unfortunately I don't think the guy is going to get the car worked in and finished in time for me to take it to Miami If you have read all of this you should ask what about the five radial tires. Well, they cost me $1600, and the spare has never been on the road. Less than 1,000 miles on the tires and I want to sell them. The price is $750 plus shipping. I am 155 miles north of Miami if you're coming to the show and want to pick them up, buy them and I'll hold them until you get here. They're in my garage.............remember, only about half price. Earl Beauchamp, Jr., 804-366-4870, Sebring, FL or suzybelle39baby@aol.com BCA #55
  5. Twenty-one months ago I purchased five new 820R15 radial witewall COKER tires for my 1941 Buick Roadmaster. I drove it on one CCCA Tour (200 miles round trip) and then put it into a restoration shop. After it was restored I drove it on another CCCA Tour of 480 miles, and then decided I didn't like the look of radials. These are COKER AMERICAN CLASSIC tires. I put the car into a different local shop to rebuild the front end and the entire brake system. The car only has 59K original miles on it, but I had the parts and wanted to make it as close to new condition as possible. I probably didn't need to do any of this work, but I wanted a "new" 1941 Bu ick Roadmaster. Crazy? Heck, I'm 81 years old, why save those NOS parts? When I did that I went back to COKER and bought five original-style new 7.00x15 bias tires. Unfortunately I don't think the guy is going to get the car worked in and finished in time for me to take it to Miami....oh well. If you have read all of this you should ask what about the five radial tires. Well, they cost me $1600, and the spare has never been on the road. Less than 1,000 miles on the tires and I want to sell them. The price is $750 plus shipping. I am 155 miles north of Miami if you're coming to the show and want to pick them up, buy them and I'll hold them until you get here. They're in my garage.............remember, only about half price. Earl Beauchamp, Jr., 804-366-4870, Sebring, FL or suzybelle39baby@aol.com
  6. Even in 1971 I was paid $75 a day cash for "Tora, Tora, Tora" which was more than I made at work, so I took vacation time. They dressed us in oldtime clothing and put fake 1941 tags over our tags. I thought they did a good job taking care of us in downtown DC. Most of us drove down from the Baltimore area every day. And some days we drove back home with our oldtime bulb headlights. I wonder if I'd do that today? 😊 I remember a '38 Studebaker, a '37 Dodge, a '41 Chrysler, my car, and a Packard 120 (about a 1936 I think), a '37 Oldsmobile coupe. There may have been more. I was contacted by a Classic Car Club guy who said they needed some everyday cars, and in our CHVA Region in Baltimore that was basically all anybody collected.
  7. My car was seen parked (back end) at the War Dept, and was seen driving by the Navy Department on Constitution Avenue (I think that is the correct Avenue). I rather think the old Navy Department building is no longer there.....memory tells me it was one of those Tempo Buildings that were all over DC. I grew up just outside of DC in Arlington, VA
  8. Yeah, I never saw or herd tell of it in a theater, but I also found a VHS copy and saw that . All you saw of my car was the guy sitting in the back seat and a pair of headlights coming into one of the government buildings at night. I DID, however, see our club member, John Palmer, in his one line role playing in place of Dan Duryea who was missing that day. Do you remember that? It was a long time ago now. Happy New Year there in California. I'm in Florida now.
  9. My blue '39 Buick was used in the movie "Tora, Tora, Tora" way back in 1971 along with some other cars in our Baltimore club. We ate well and were paid well. My car was in several scenes both driving and parked. We were paid well and ate well. The way Paramount paid daily us was a hoot. My '39 Buick convertible sedan, recently sold, was used in the movie "The Secret Files of J. Edgar Hoover in DC. I drove the "star" in one scene where he sat in the back seat. This wasn't a highpriced movie and I think few people ever saw it. The blue car was used in a TV movie called something like "Franklin & Elinor". Most of those were night scenes and I never saw anything of my car, except maybe one whitewall tire, but we ate well and were paid well. A friend used his Oldsmobile's a month or so ago in a movie in Orlando and he was paid a lot better than we were back in the seventies 🤤. By the way Buick35, when I was born in 1938, I came home from the hospital in the exact same car as yours. I owned an identical model for some five years and drove it on at least two Glidden Tours. I sold it when they upped the Glidden through 1942. It ended up with a dealer in Orlando and he sold it to somebody in Spain...sad ending for a nice old original 1935 Buick Series 41 Special. I hate to see any nice old car go overseas...just how I feel. Marty Roth are you still going to Miami and coming by my place for those tires. They are standing ready in my detached garage. Earl
  10. Oh yes, last year on the Sentimental Tour in Mississippi. The bank on the side of the road was so steep I almost turned the car over; but I can still drive pretty good. Other members on the tour jacked the car up, pulled the wheel and put on the spare. The backup driver luckily had a rope and tow hitch on his pickup truck and pulled my car back up the road out of the muddy shoulder. The restored car was very muddy underneath. He took the tire to a tire shop and they installed a new tube in side patch in case I needed it. It was a new tire that ran over a nail and I had to run flat on it to get off the road, but it was insured and Coker replaced it. This could have happened to any modern car. Other tourists tried to install new points and condenser in the 71 Rivvie on that trip, but the NAPA condenser wasn't any good and didn't last 30 miles out of town, but replacement I had bought on the tour held up until I got home but a bad ignition NOS "show" wire caused a miss for the whole 350 miles. I stopped at a huge repair garage at the end of the PA turnpike before Rt. 70 south and the 30-something mechanic had no idea what to do with the distributor so I limped back to VA on a wing and a prayer. I'm too old for that kind of nervous strain.
  11. My cars are restored, but they are old and NOS parts are old....sometimes gone bad on the shelf. You just can't trust any car, new or old, but newer cars can be fixed on the road with readily available parts and younger mechanics taught or who have experience repairing them. For the most part they have no idea what to do on an old car with ancient technology. You've proven your own words, you have mechanical ability. For years I had friends readily available to help, as you say. Now that I'm 81, most of them are dead or incapacitated. For that matter I'm somewhat incapacitated now myself. I'm not sure I can change a tire anymore after recent major surgeries. The deal with the 71Rivvie is a real case in point.
  12. My question is, if you are not mechanically inclined, like me, and your car breaks down far from home, what do you do? I carry some simple stuff like points & condenser, distributor cap, water pump, and I have an electric fuel pump in line on a switch in case I have to use Ethanol. I even carry a spare fuel pump, because you don't want to run too far on the electric pump if the mechanical fails. I carry a master cylinder and wheel cylinders just in case. On a tour with a '48 Buick the master cylinder started to leak bad. A kit was available from NAPA, but no mechanic at the Buick Garage knew how to rebuild one and in the end I had to buy a reamer for the mechanic who thought he could. They they didn't have a tool to bleed the brakes because the master cylinder was on the frame. On a Tour to Ohio with our 1971 Riviera the points went up, and I couldn't find a modern mechanic who knew how to install points & condenser. So, when I got home I had an electronic ignition installed..problem solved. So I got one for my 1939 Buick and it wouldn't work because the engine area got to hot for the thing to function. Home again, I had a new rebuilt distributor installed with points & condenser and went back to it. Even if you carry new obvious breakdown parts there are no older mechanics left who ever learned how to install them. And NOW, IF you have a pre-1961 Buick with the torque tube drive train, you can forget finding somebody to install a clutch, u-joint or any rear end parts, including wheel bearings and seals. You can restore all you want, but parts, especially NOS parts, can often fail and leave on the side of the road (maybe at 25 degrees or 100 degrees) and that is no fun. I use a trailer with a modern truck (Suburban is still a truck to me). That way I have AC and I can get the puller fixed if I have to. And that has happened twice, once with each Suburban I've owned.
  13. Basically, I think it is six of one but half dozen of the other. The people at BOB's are much nicer, friendlier, etc.; but often they don't have what I want so then I go to CARS. But an example of a difference is that recently I needed a rebuilt fuel pump in a hurry, and I hadn't rebuilt my last core for the shelf. CARS had it on the shelf, but with a $100 core charge. I didn't like that, but sometimes you do what you have to do. So I got the last used fuel pump off the car in the garage and mailed it to the as the core for another $14 and change. That's been a month ago and I still don't have my $100 back. They keep saying the rebuilder hasn't gotten around to insuring he car rebuild my old one. Well, the car was running when I bought it two years ago on that fuel pump, but it was leaking from a gasket. I see no reason for them fooling around so long to send my core charge back. I have called twice. But I've known the owner since he ran a flea market spot with NOS Buick parts and I know he is a straight shooter....he just doesn't live nearby anymore and has a manager I think running the business. As for Bob, I knew his father who started the business. Only problem I ever had with Bob was my restorer insisted the new rebuilt clutch wouldn't work, so Bob send another one and had them send that one back. Then he called me and complained there was nothing wrong with the first one. All I know is the second one worked. I think the shop mechanic was a retired Chevrolet garage mechanic and there may have been something he didn't understand at the King of the Road-----a straight8 Buick 🙂
  14. You'll be out driving along in 5-7 years and one day one of those radials will blow out, blow your wheels apart and your fender off. Wanna take that chance? I decided not to.
  15. Marty, You can get a brand new water pump for that car from either CARS or KANTER. Still looking for you to come by in February to pick up the tires -🙂-need the money. Guess you heard that I've retired from judging. Earl ( suzybelle39baby@gmail.com .