Dynaflash8

Is hobby interest in pre-WWII cars Dying?

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 I hope your surgery goes well and you look back on this thread not as a criticism but as a possible learning experience. I've been following not because your car is my ideal car or because I'm ready to sell any of my cars, but the time is getting closer to selling even though I still get tempted to buy another.  I'm following for my own sake and wish you well in the upcoming surgery and the sale of one of your cherished cars.

 

Carl

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My Grandfather used to say "I heard its a piss poor man who won't go half way. I'll split the difference with you."

 

I was pretty young, but recognized it as a great way to boost you own self esteem and put the other guy in an awkward position.

 

Ahhhh, my formative years.

Bernie

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Posted (edited)

Okay, all of you got what you wanted.  I told the dealer I want the car back at 1 PM on next Tuesday, May 28.  I have to go up there to see it before I have AAA pick it or decide to drive it the 55 miles home.  It's been sitting for 5 months, but it has often sat that long in my garage, except the new battery might be dead by now.  He thinks I'm too old and sick to drive it home myself...ha.  But, I might take the easy way out.  I have AAA for 125 miles.  I hope I made everybody happy.  I dont' know if I'm happy or not.  He said he'd reduced the price to $41,500 and cut his commission, and I don't disbelieve him.  Actually, I like the guy personally.  But, according to one of you who should know, you can't just keep cutting the price.  After my heart surgery, maybe I'll put it up for sale in Hemmings, BCA and other places or maybe I'll wait until I'm 82 when I plan to sell the truck and trailer (June, 2020).  Hear this.  My wife is a tough cookie.  If anything happens to me I'll bet she'll be harder to deal with than me. 😀  Oh yeah, I'll take all the advice and remove the Trippe Lights and put them in my trophy case.

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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Earl, all I want is to see you maximize your price.  From what you posted, it seems pretty reasonable.  Good luck getting the car and with the next steps.

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3 hours ago, Dynaflash8 said:

 I told the dealer I want the car back at 1 PM on next Tuesday, May 28. ...

 He said he'd reduced the price to $41,500 and cut his commission... 

 

Earl, I trust all will be well with you.

You and your wife could always put the car on sale now,

for very close to your bottom-line price, and she could

do much of the dealing.  Your dealer may be willing to take

$41,500, but he still has the 1939 Buick listed at $52,500

on his own website:

 

http://www.mjcclassiccars.com/1939-buick-special-phaeton/

 

And he still has it listed at $62,500 on the Hemmings website:

 

https://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/dealer/buick/special/2221273.html

 

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A happy point to ponder:

One of our local AACA region members had a big sale

and dispersed most of his car collection.  However,

he lived well beyond that, to 100, and he and his wife

even celebrated their 80th wedding anniversary.

 

He regretted selling off his cars too soon!

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8 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Earl, I trust all will be well with you.

You and your wife could always put the car on sale now,

for very close to your bottom-line price, and she could

do much of the dealing.  Your dealer may be willing to take

$41,500, but he still has the 1939 Buick listed at $52,500

on his own website:

 

http://www.mjcclassiccars.com/1939-buick-special-phaeton/

 

And he still has it listed at $62,500 on the Hemmings website:

 

https://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/dealer/buick/special/2221273.html

 

I'll do any dealing as long as I'm living.  The price will be at the $37,500 when it goes on sale.  Meanwhile, if I really get it back Tuesday it can rest safely in my garage until I'm able and ready to do that.

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A good rest for both of you and everything will be better! 👍

 

Take care.

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

A good rest for both of you and everything will be better! 👍

 

Take care.

Frank: I wonder just how good and complete Mary Washington Hospital in Fredericksburg is.  When I lived in Montross, all of my friends who had any serious problem had to go to MCV in Richmond.  I'd dearly love to move back to Montross, but the state income taxes and snow turn me away. We have a good governor and no state income taxes here in Florida.  We've been looking at Lake City because they have a great AACA Region club, very active, and the climate is much like Virginia without the snow.  Living in Montross was the happiest time in our married life, especially before I retired in 1992 and we moved there full time from Maryland.  Until then we used the place for weekends.  I had 5 acreas, 3 in hilly grass.  Cutting that grass would kill us now.  I knew that and since we were 1/4 mile off the road, we decided to sell out in 2005 and come to Florida.  And yes, this is off the subject.  Please don't throw the thread off line with a bunch of comments on this off-thread note to Frank.

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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On ‎5‎/‎18‎/‎2019 at 6:52 AM, Dynaflash8 said:

auburnseeker: The same guy recently sold a '38 Ford 4dr convertible for $38,500.  That is easily in the ballpark of what I want.  His price gives him room to accept a trade-in if somebody wants to go that way.  Where I come from the asking price never means anything.  I had a $55K second home in VA listed for $49,900 that sold for $35,000 and her initial offer was $25K.  That's how the real world works.  I still think the market is drying up for not just pre-WWII cars but pre-1955 cars that aren't Fords, V8s or speciality cars like say a 1953 Olds Fiesta etc.

 

Earl:

 

It's regrettable that some part of the hobby is a popularity contest.  That is why whether pre war or post war some Chevys and Fords sell for more money than Buicks and Oldsmobiles. 

 

I'm no expert but monitor the non auction high end market.  There is a culture shift going on and there are fewer buyers. edinmass and others move in a different more affluent collector world than 95% of us. 

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On ‎5‎/‎14‎/‎2019 at 2:32 PM, Matt Harwood said:

 

Good point--always look at what else that money will buy. I've found that there are two kinds of buyers for most cars: the specific buyer and the opportunity buyer.

What else can I buy for that money? We should all ask ourselves that question before we paste a price on any car we're selling.

 

Ding ding ding!!!  This is it for me, and I am not necessarily the benchmark for the market but I am at another tipping point where I can come back into the market and buy.  It will likely be this year.  My budget will be, eh, $40,000 tops.  And I probably won't spend that.  I want 2 cars not one. 

 

It's not fair to compare your car to some of the cars I am considering, but at age 55, I like cars from the teens to the 90's.  My sweet spot would be the large cars from Cadillac and Buick in the 1970's.  Yep, people collect those.  And I can get a low mileage well taken cared for collector car from this era for $6000 to $14,000. 

 

Or - there are 60's convertible "drivers" all day long for $10,000 to $15,000.  The fifties are an interesting sub market right now. 2 door hardtops and convertibles are pricey but if a collector wants to experience the hobby and smile all the way, get a four door sedan for - you guessed it - $10,000 to $15,000. 

 

I am following several 40's Cadillacs for no more than $20K asking that are not selling.  I am looking at a 1920 Cadillac for $25K asking and so on.  I am trying to get 2 cars for what you are asking for one.   I feel that scratches more itches, and I know Earl you have probably had more than one car at certain times. 

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A happy point to ponder:

One of our local AACA region members had a big sale

and dispersed most of his car collection.  However,

he lived well beyond that, to 100, and he and his wife

even celebrated their 80th wedding anniversary.

 

He regretted selling off his cars too soon!

 

In the end, it is only money and in most cases..........................extra.

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1 hour ago, mercer09 said:

In the end, it is only money and in most cases..........................extra.

 

Money is not that hard to get, and a buck is a buck. "I" have a '64 Riviera.

 

As to selling a car too soon in life, a lifelong friend of mine died a couple of years ago. Any time he saw me put a car up for sale he would ask "Okay, what don't you like about that one?". Perceptive guy. (Maybe he asked just a bit more coarsely)

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Yes Bernie, money is not hard to get. But it all needs to be eventually  paid back; with interest, although these days that part is not so painful as it once was. Now that I am retired debt is something I personally avoid unless a true deal of a lifetime miraculously appears.

 The old car price slump still hasn't effected my local market. Asking prices are still generally  quite high, although it's hard to tell if anyone is actually finding a buyer. Perhaps another few years are necessary.  There are still too many empty nester's around here that downsized their house over the last 3 or 4 years and have a very substantial bucket list bank balance.  For some of them an old car is still on the list so prices ; optimistic or not, seem to me to be very strong. I hope to stay in my present home up to the end so no windfall gain for me. In any case the local property bubble finally seems to be deflating so it would not be much of a payoff anyway, plus a ton of work to relocate.

 

 

 

Greg in Canada

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My comment was meant to be more general. All money is pretty much the same. All cars are different in many specific ways.

 

Referring to the person who sold his cars too early and outlived his expectations, when the car is gone, whether a "64 Riviera or a '39 Special, and all one has is the money, you are left with a handful of money that is just like anyone else's money. Personally, I am shooting to live to about 106. The Riviera will be with me. I wouldn't exchange it for some universal commodity like money. If I couldn't drive it I would sit and look at it...... probably in that same pneumatic draftsman's chair I sit in today.

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Posted (edited)

Sorry Bernie; I misunderstood the "money is not hard to get" part, I thought you were making a more generalized statement about money.  You actually meant if you have a reasonably valuable; ready to drive, car it is not hard to sell and turn into money.

 

I thought you were talking about new money, not the conversion of an existing asset into liquid cash. It's that new money part that gives many of us a challenge.

 

Yes , as long as one has a few desirable assets liquidating them should be reasonably straightforward.

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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If I couldn't drive it I would sit and look at it .............

 

i CAN DRIVE THEM, BUT GET IMMENSE SATISFACTION FROM JUST LOOKING AT THEM DAILY.

 

so many variations in this "hobby".

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Those of us who can recognize a Model A Ford from a block away just by its sound are becoming fewer and fewer.

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1 hour ago, mercer09 said:

If I couldn't drive it I would sit and look at it .............

 

i CAN DRIVE THEM, BUT GET IMMENSE SATISFACTION FROM JUST LOOKING AT THEM DAILY.

 

so many variations in this "hobby".

Having the car or project is everything to me, its been a great hobby, so many great cars and people over the years. The "Golden Years" of the hobby will always be a highlight I look back on. Bob 

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1 hour ago, Restorer32 said:

Those of us who can recognize a Model A Ford from a block away just by its sound are becoming fewer and fewer.

I can and have done that a few times, usually when alone but at least I get that satisfied feeling...  😉

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True, I get the most pleasure out of fiddling with mine. The problem is that after the doldrums of the late 70's to early '90s, cars are getting interesting again with many examples available in the sub-$10,000 range. Further the improvements in drivetrains, tires, and lights cannot be denied (particularly here with over 50" of rain a year).

 

Have always ad at least one convertible (have three at moment) and finding I like retractables better than cloth tops (even Pontiac had one before the demise & are cheap now).

 

So the if one specific area seems to be shrinking, it is because the market as a whole is growing again as the next wave of interesting cars are reaching 25 now and the skill set for maintaining them is different. Not more difficult or hard to learn, just different.

 

If anything the real problem is that mechanics today are trained to be parts swappers and not repairers so the ethos of the industry is changing. One big sign is that a stock 55 Chevvy brings less at auction than one with an Art Morrison chassis and LS drivetrain. Modern times.

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I have lived 80 years and never found money easy to find.  Like my Dad, I do like the warm feeling of invested money paying me a check every month.  When old cars were $50-600 it didn't make much difference, but now it makes no sense to me to have cars sitting around that there is no place to drive them to, and no club with members to socialize with to be found.  The hobby to me was always the people in it.  I am frustrated by the fact I moved to a warm climate only to find I miss all of my old car friends and there are damned few around here.

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Where you live has much to do with it. When I lived in Southern California, both Orange County and Los Angeles County driving had no joy in it. All flat, crowded 4 lane boulevards and freeways. I did enjoy going places, like a tourist, looking around Hollywood. But there was no way to have a nice drive, unless you would really get out of it. In northern California roads through the hills are easily accessible.

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Also how far you drive is a consideration. When I lived 15 minutes from work in Richmond, I drove old cars a lot to and from work (no, not with antique plates, unless I was exercising or working on them :)). Now that I drive 40 miles to work on a 4 lane road, I rarely take any old car there (well, my co-workers think I do since the daily drivers are close to AACA eligible!). And then there is dealing with antique plates and rules at work.... Just not happening.

 

Where Earl did live, driving from there back towards me is very pleasant old car driving area. Lots of small roads to bypass or be part of tourists.;) Great touring area, just stay east of I-95!

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On 5/13/2019 at 3:12 AM, 1937hd45 said:

THANK YOU! The hobby will be fine without the iPhone people. Bob 

 

 

Havent read the whole thread yet, but the last 5 or so posts above this one sure point out some stuff.

 

CCCA - they seem to only recognise cars they are well out of reach of the average Joe (for “full classics”.). That’s an issue.

 

AACA - People like the above where they say the hobby doesn’t need young people, despite the fact it’s population is rapidly dying out. Good luck getting new people when you don’t want new people. It’s a toxic attitude to dislike someone for their use of technology. I don’t use any of the Facebook, Twitter etc platforms either, but I have a basic understanding of them and sure do see their use. Facebook alone is responsible for killing off thousands of forums by making them redundant (although I much prefer forums, keeps information easier to find and more visible). Facebook (and I hate Facebook with a passion) has a huge market place, and gives huge exposure. It’s incredibly stupid to not advertise something for sale in places where it’ll get the most exposure based on your personal biases.

 

As for is interest in pre war cars waning; I’ll say no. It’s just the prices are getting too high for most.

 

Cheers,

Troy.

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