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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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2 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

105692689_3991914457516658_7282459512023353427_o.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_sid=825194&_nc_ohc=1IXHqjYW-gUAX9N0nnM&_nc_ht=scontent.fluk1-1.fna&oh=537b1a00b77152639e4d3124a7bd1325&oe=5F1A108C

This photo was taken in Brooklyn, NY . the dealer was Conover T. Silver who had some custom Willys - Kinight - Overland cars made to order in the teens /twenties era. Makes sense as Brooklyn had a lot of wealthy residents there and could afford a custom body built to order. William Pase had the Franklin dealership in Brooklyn ( as well as several other locations) and also saw amazing sales of that marque with several custom bodies being ordered as well. I have many of Pase's photographs that were taken of his operation here in Brooklyn and in Manhattan.

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Here is the "what I learned today" detective wise - Thank you Randy Ema.

 

I had these two Duesenberg photos saved in a folder as the same car - they are supposedly on the same drive with same building behind, appear similar shades via B&W photos, and ...  That said, Randy Ema was quick to point out they are different Duesenberg Murphy Beverly's and you can tell bey he trim on the rear fender.  

 

Now can you imagine the fluke day of walking out of the office to for a second need to figure out which Duesenberg Murphy Beverly is yours ? 

 

Lupe Velez - Johnny Weisemuller -  J449-2462 Murphy Beverly engine only survives 

gettyimages-3170306-2048x2048.jpg

 

 

Conrad Nagel walking past -  J419-2448 also scrapped

gettyimages-3296906-2048x2048.jpg

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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4 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Thanks A.J.  I thought LeBaron too, but couldn't match up other details with that coachbuilder in my references.   The headlights look too round and mounted to high to be the factory units, maybe Marchals?

 

The headlamps ( look to the left in the photo to see another one peeking out and the bumper is also Duesenberg) are Grebel, produced in France. You know them, as they are some what flattened circles. They came in several sizes and produced spot lamps as well. Someplace here I have a sales catalog on them if I can find it I will post. The Grebel lamps were available in NY City through the accessories dealer Nil Melior.

WG

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10 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Things & Stuff........

 

lebaronhudson.jpg

 

Good Looking Hudson - no offense to Hudson owners, but my Mom says I cannot ever have one as that is not what the cool kids drove (she drove a 1947 Cadillac Fastback) - apparently it was some sort of dating criteria (Dad drove an Austin Healey 100-6).

 

Sidenote:  Mom is also anti - Nash, Rambler, Studebaker, Kaiser, Willys, and .... 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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4 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

 

Sidenote:  Mom is also anti - Nash, Rambler, Studebaker, Kaiser, Willys, and .... 


Seems she has pretty good taste.......but they did make a few nice Studebakers.

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In Sweden the Oldsmobile Curved Dash was the most popular private car in the early days of motoring.

Prince Eugen (1865-1947) in his car at Djurgården, Stockholm https://www.waldemarsudde.se/in-english/prince-eugen/

 

I think the man in the second photo worked for the Swedish Olds  Importer Gjestvagns and latter founded his own Company, importing one of the more popular American automobiles

 

 

IMG_2949.JPG

IMG_2948.JPG

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2 hours ago, Bob Jacobsen said:

1934 Brunn Pierce Towncar in Brunn frame - can you spot the reversal?981254224_IMG_24483.thumb.JPG.22db216775f0bb0712cbd85a679b00eb.JPG


 

So your the one who ended up with this photo...........I wondered where it went to.

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12 hours ago, 30DodgePanel said:

Cantrell body works factory.jpg

J. T. Cantrell and Company, Builder of suburban bodies located in Huntington, Long Island, NY. In pre war days for the most part suburban was the name for a station wagon ( which meant you took the car with this body style  to the train station to drop off people or pick them up along with their luggage) . The "station" name in station wagon referred to the "train " station. This is the Cantrell plant ( later burned down at least once) just south of the long island rail road tracks and west of New York Avenue ( state route 110) . The Chevrolet chassis you see here started life as 2 door sedans and business coupes, mostly the latter which were made in the G.M. plant in Tarrytown, NY on the Hudson river about 100 miles away. These cars were shipped by rail to Cantrell and then the coupe bodies removed just aft of the front door post so that Cantrell could have a cowl/windshield and built their body on it. I did a history of the Cantrell Company for Hemmings Classic Car magazine within the past year or so that showed further pictures of the Cantrell brothers and their operation. Post WWII Cantrell mostly built station wagon bodies on Chevy , Studebaker and GMC truck chassis.

 

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Walt, That was a great article you wrote on J.T. Cantrell and Company, should be required reading for all who are interested in early station wagon body companies.   By the way, was there any documentation how they disposed of all the cut-away two door coach and coupe body sections?   One supposes Cantrell were the primary go-to source for Metro NYC body repair shops when they had need of such for a Chevy that had been rear-end.

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  • gwells changed the title to Period images to relieve some of the stress
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