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Here is the sleeper of the Amelia Island Auctions - 1932 Lancia Dilambda


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A think the knock on Lancia as a marque is misdirected - they were known for innovative engineering.  I would argue that the smaller size helps driveability, BUT the concerns with both overall driver room and "the Italian driving position" are very much to be checked.  Castagna is certainly a quality coachbuilder - well known for bodies on Isotta-Fraschini.  Pebble Beach if it stays in the US, but likely to end up at Villa d'Este.

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Ronn, 2 here in CT.  The Carini's and a MARC member who drives his a lot.  One more in RI collection.  Tom L. Sold off some high end As for RI guy, not sure if he is moving that one along also.

 

Oddities but don't really trip my trigger, so if I see one I will send you the lead. 😊

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Hartung auction had one or two- but copies. sold for not much.

 

has always been my favorite A. whole thread on the Barn from several years ago.

 

I tried buying the only remaining 1930 up in NY, but it is only the body and missing everything........

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24 minutes ago, bryankazmer said:

A think the knock on Lancia as a marque is misdirected - they were known for innovative engineering.  I would argue that the smaller size helps driveability, BUT the concerns with both overall driver room and "the Italian driving position" are very much to be checked.  Castagna is certainly a quality coachbuilder - well known for bodies on Isotta-Fraschini.  Pebble Beach if it stays in the US, but likely to end up at Villa d'Este.

Agreed, though most people have never seen one much less worked on one.  Having grown up with a 1927 7th Series Lambda in the family, I will say that very single part on one is totally fascinating (ex. unibody construction) and while mechanically challenging via parts supply issues (surprisingly some stuff is available though and it was made with a machine too mentality to begin with) they are popular cars for tours in Europe.  As to drivability - the 7th series car was really no different than driving a MGTC - all be it larger, more HP, and a little better stability/handling.  And, this one is as nice of condition and as complete as any Lancia comes.   Also, keep in mind that it is basically designed for the American Market - a real oddity in itself too.  Hopefully, this gets out on concours circuit both as an unrestored car and then someday again as a restored car. 

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It is a good thing my entire retirement account was wiped out last week  or I would bid on this just to prove my point.   I'd be tooling around on the Pebble tour in the back seat.    Kirk would be wearing the chauffeur's cap.

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Enough should have come back yesterday to get the car AJ, but you may need to drive it yourself

 

 

and lost again today!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! time to get the Yugo out........

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Steve Plunkett has a mid 20s Cadillac in his Cadillac collection called the chicken coup Cadillac. He has the car on the mezzanine  in the main car salon. In its original condition never restored and only cleaned up for display. The same may happen to the topic car here. 

Steve Plunkett.jpg

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)
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So.......I agree 100 percent with Matt on this one..........

 

Its a neat, unusual, and interesting car. Now a few more comments...............

 

Its tiny, and there is NO getting around the chassis length.

Its styling is uninspired at best...........

Cheap and easy Pebble ticket......I think NOT. It MIGHT get a consideration, with a chance of placement. Maybe.

Does anyone here know “the” Lancia collector? Why doesn’t he own it? Answer.......he probably doesn’t want it.

 

This is a cool coach built car with an interesting engine............but the real question is, who is going to fall in love with it and restore it, as it’s too far gone to be a true preservation car........unless you dump 80k in it to make it look like a real preservation car, which it will then no longer be. Trust me on this there are a lot of older Restorations that are being pushed as preservation cars today. 
 

The insane question is......if acquired for free, and someone was willing to dump the 300-400k to make this a really nice car, who wants to do that much work on a small town car? It’s a weird car......that’s why the price will be so low.

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Okay, I have a silly question (maybe a couple?). If the car is that small? I have never been close up with one of these.

I have been looking at it here for a couple days, reading all the comments at least twice. It is newer than I generally go for, I prefer to stay 1927 or earlier, in part because one of the local clubs I really like is a "nickel age" club and cuts off after '27. Yet somehow, I like the silly thing. So I am trying to imagine how small or large it may be. Would it qualify as a CCCA Classic? Would it be a given? Or one of those "please apply" oddities.

Now, there is virtually no chance I would be able to consider trying to buy something like this, and the year would be all the reason I would need to keep walking. I certainly cannot afford to care for it properly, another reason why I should not consider it even if I could. Frankly, I am reaching too old to consider something that needs that much work. Ten years ago I would have loved it!

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6 hours ago, edinmass said:

So.......I agree 100 percent with Matt on this one..........

 

Its a neat, unusual, and interesting car. Now a few more comments...............

 

Its tiny, and there is NO getting around the chassis length.

Its styling is uninspired at best...........

Cheap and easy Pebble ticket......I think NOT. It MIGHT get a consideration, with a chance of placement. Maybe.

Does anyone here know “the” Lancia collector? Why doesn’t he own it? Answer.......he probably doesn’t want it.

 

This is a cool coach built car with an interesting engine............but the real question is, who is going to fall in love with it and restore it, as it’s too far gone to be a true preservation car........unless you dump 80k in it to make it look like a real preservation car, which it will then no longer be. Trust me on this there are a lot of older Restorations that are being pushed as preservation cars today. 
 

The insane question is......if acquired for free, and someone was willing to dump the 300-400k to make this a really nice car, who wants to do that much work on a small town car? It’s a weird car......that’s why the price will be so low.

 

Make up your mind.  Either it is small and powered fine by 100hp engine,  or it is big and heavy  and under powered with a 100hp engine.   

 

As for Pebble,   your American car bias is showing. You think it is 200  never before seen interesting cars just lined up every year?   It is very hard to fill out that show field every year.   This car is a gift.

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36 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

Make up your mind.  Either it is small and powered fine by 100hp engine,  or it is big and heavy  and under powered with a 100hp engine.   

 

 

100 horsepower is pretty good and comparable to cars of the period, but it's only ~230 cubic inches (3.9 liters). It's going to be pretty soft on torque. That's what I was getting at when I said it was under-powered. It's small, but I bet it's still pretty heavy with custom coachwork on it. It's smallish so it's not Packard heavy, but certainly heavier than, say, a small series early '30s Buick. I know exactly nothing about that engine--although I find the design fascinating--so I don't know if it needs to rev to make its power. I like the independent front suspension, too.

 

Definitely a cool package of advanced thinking in the design, but all my remarks above still stand--it just misses all the important marks for someone to invest serious money in the restoration.

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Maybe just propaganda but if D. Cameron Peck did ever bother to own this car then it must be fantastic end of story. He was one of the first to even think of collecting, had his pick of anything and everything and reportedly wouldn't think twice to drop $1000 on a car when everyone else thought $400 was the moon. He's a guy who knew nice.

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14 hours ago, alsancle said:

This shows the V8 configuration:

 

lancia%201930%20dilambda-3.jpg

 

One, that's a pretty neat design. But two, does it look incredibly crude to anyone else? I mean, it might just be the old photograph, but those valve guide things running down the center look like they were hand-made by an 8th grader and the ports in the block almost look like they were drilled by eye rather than with measurements. I mean, the cylinders barely look round. I'm sure it's a trick of the photo's angle, but I find it amusing nonetheless. It's easy to believe that Italian workmanship of the period is just that crude. Who would expect anything else? If those guys could make tires by hand and each one is unique to fit a hand-made wheel, they would. Standardization? Feh. It's not the Italian way.

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Agree with Matt that the engine doesn't have enough torque for a car weighing in at over 4500 lb.. If D. Cameron Peck did own this car wouldn't it show up in his auction, or did he sell it before the auction? Strange that the auction company could not research this reported previous owner.

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5 minutes ago, A. Ballard 35R said:

Agree with Matt that the engine doesn't have enough torque for a car weighing in at over 4500 lb.. If D. Cameron Peck did own this car wouldn't it show up in his auction, or did he sell it before the auction? Strange that the auction company could not research this reported previous owner.

 

I have been banned from discussing auction companies' abilities and procedures on this forum but speculation and conjecture is probably all that exists for this particular car. That auction description should have more asterisks on it than Barry Bonds' batting record.

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, mike6024 said:

Stock market has been brutal

 

Since mid-last week, I have heard of several Cincinnati companies where there employees will not touch their shipments from China - basically stuff is piling up on docks and warehouses and the Unions are supporting such = kind of shoots in the foot that good idea of cost savings to make it in China and the "global economy" as well when these sort of problems arise (and anywhere for that matter).   That said, where there is a problem there is also opportunity  and stock market will rebound. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)
On 3/3/2020 at 11:05 AM, 1950panhead said:

Spare tires ... (I think)

 

 

24955871-1-6.jpg

1197016142_image(8).thumb.jpg.013b5e26767cfe8f3156cfbf787fca30.jpg.ab7686f29f33ab8c596c7eb8b3e5e492.jpg

Yes, a pair sidemount wheels in the front corner of the garage and with a set of tire covers too in the matching brown paint.

 

Probably should be a front bumper laying around and the luggage trunk is probably in the house used as a cedar chest 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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8 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

I have been banned from discussing auction companies' abilities and procedures on this forum but speculation and conjecture is probably all that exists for this particular car. That auction description should have more asterisks on it than Barry Bonds' batting record.


Wow......banned from certain subjects! I’m impressed! I don’t even have a warning point yet......although I have had one post removed back about five years ago. Never bothered to ask why. For the first time in twenty years, my better half was asking about what I was posting about here, and read the thread. All she did was shake her head. She asked about one hundred question about the car.........I told her being the winning bidder at the auction  was like getting the coronavirus ................you will be dead or dead broke before you get a ride in the car by the time it’s finished!

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Victoria is cleaning up a whole lot better than this will and besides the running board stuff to make it right,  I have about $30 in cleaners and sandpaper invested so far. :) 

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8 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Victoria is cleaning up a whole lot better than this will and besides the running board stuff to make it right,  I have about $30 in cleaners and sandpaper invested so far. :) 


Randy...........don’t worry about the 30 bucks.........when you get the headlight reflectors you need, your budget will experience the Tiffany & Company retail experience! 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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But then common wisdom on these forums says the car is worthless since it would cost more to restore than it is "worth". " Beware the Philistine who knows the price of everything but the value of nothing."

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Just now, Restorer32 said:

But then common wisdom on these forums says the car is worthless since it would cost more to restore than it is "worth". " Beware the Philistine who knows the price of everything but the value of nothing."

 

And then the owner tries to sell it and says, "I need to get all my money back out of it plus a little profit, too." Beware the Philistine who spends too much and knows the value of nothing but expects to find another sucker to make him whole anyway.

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9 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

I would take the Pierce Arrow next to it instead. 


the one incorrectly labeled a Model 42?   Ed can elaborate.

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Whatever model it is,  I'll take it over the Lancia.  Like everything you would be the man of the day when you show up with it all restored after spending untold sums of money like one can do on any car.  Then in a year it will be another old unusual car, to which there are many.   Probably after a few years out of the show circuit people will forget about it.  It's cool, but not overly impressive or memorable like the Silver Arrow or some of the other cars that are emblazoned in our old car Noggins. 

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