Restorer32

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Everything posted by Restorer32

  1. Oakley Sumpter...now there is a name I haven't heard in maybe 30 years. First resto shop I was ever in was his in Maryland in about 1967. Dad almost bought a Model T Huckster truck from him but $700 was too much to pay for an old car, even if it was restored.
  2. Maybe but the property he bought was about 75 miles from his home where the car resided.
  3. 4 covers in excellent condition. Fit 17" wheels and accommodate Packard hub caps. Chrome ring around outer circumference in good shape. $500 plus shipping for the 4. Pics to follow.
  4. Looking for a pair of hood sides for a '33 Packard 1001 Standard 8. Any restorable condition considered.
  5. Friend of mine was restoring a '29 Packard Phaeton. For some reason he was missing the driver's side lower hood panel. He also bought investment properties. While cleaning out his latest real estate buy he found a high shelf in the attic, too high to see into so he reached up to feel if anything was there and you guessed it, he pulled out a '29 Packard driver's side hood panel, the only car part in the building.
  6. I would be interested in any 17' adjustable spoke wire wheels.
  7. Automotive clear will not crack if you add a flex agent as recommended when spraying plastic bumpers etc. As a test we sprayed a length of plastic welting with clear with a flex agent. We were able to literally tie the welting in knots without the clear cracking. Am I confused but doesn't "artillery wheels" refer to wheels with steel "spokes" rather than to wood wheels?
  8. Years ago we had a client who decided to do what he could before turning his one of a kind 1908 vehicle over to us for restoration. I told him he could save some $ if he were to strip the ugly paint from the wood wheels. On his own he decided that sandblasting the wood wheels would be the most efficient way to remove the paint. It was but it also ruined the wheels, as you can imagine.
  9. I looked for a pair of external horns for a '32 Packard 900 for over 35 years. Searched Hershey every year. Never found even one. Then two years ago a pair, already restored, showed up in an online auction. Moral is to never give up.
  10. Client of ours tried to buy a car (and have us restore it). The owner had 4 identical examples of the same car. He would not sell even in the face of our well heeled client telling him to "name his price" and meaning it.
  11. If the wheels were in our shop we would use oxalic acid to bleach the water stains, rinse with water then coat with West System Epoxy. We would then sand and apply a second coat of West System or any other epoxy coating. We would not varnish the wheels. We would spray them with automotive clear tinted to look like varnish. The oxalic acid works best if you brush it on and leave the wheels out in the sun. May take several applications of oxalic before you see results. Don't believe anyone who tries to tell you wood wheels have to "breathe". They don't.
  12. We have originals for patterns and they are relatively simple to make. Decided on regular 14 ga steel since apparently Ternemetal is no longer produced.
  13. Many years ago we built a convertible top assembly for a '31 (I think) Pierce 4 door conv that was found on a bluff above a fjord in Norway. Does anyone remember this car?
  14. We also did a complete restoration of a '27 Kissel Brougham. Showed it at Hershey maybe 12 years ago. Was nominated for a National Award. It too was sold at auction and I have no idea where it is now. Thanks to Ron's collecting and restoring, Kissels have come out of obscurity and into the light. Quality built cars and just enough "different" to be interesting.
  15. One of the more fun restoration we have done. With no driver's side door it was almost impossible to get into the thing with the top up.
  16. The one we did was all yellow until Carini decided to paint the fenders black and eliminate the portholes from the top. We finished the restoration in 1996. It sat in the Kissel museum in Wisconsin until 2010 or so when it was sold. We retrieved it and got it running again and shipped it to its new owner in France. The new owner drove it across France in a 600 mile reliability tour. He declared it "reliable but not very comfortable to drive". He then sold it to Hyman Classic cars who traded it to Carini for another car. I have no idea where it is now.
  17. When I was a kid we went to the local dirt track races. Once saw the on track flagman get run over while starting a race. Broke his arm.
  18. I do not believe Kissel ever actually referred to their speedsters as "Gold Bugs". This was a name suggested, I believe by an owner of one that happened to be yellow. We restored and showed a '27 Brougham as well as the Carini Gold Bug, which he modified from original so "it would be easier to sell". Apparently Amelia Earhart referred to her Gold Bug as "The yellow peril".
  19. At our shop in South Central PA. Phone me at 717-515-8617 and I will give you a brutally honest description of the car.
  20. Here's your chance to restore a Full Classic open Packard with sidemounts, wire wheels and rumble seat. Price is certainly negotiable. Must be sold in the next 6 months or so.
  21. My Uncle started in TV as an on air personality in 1952 or so. To supplement his meagre salary he also "called" races at some of the local dirt tracks. One of his jobs was to determine which drivers were too drunk to drive. A little drunk was OK but if they were really plastered he had to black flag them. Made for some exciting racing.
  22. I would assume drivers are considered employees of their respective teams and as such are covered under Workers Compensation laws. Cannot Imagine what their workers Comp Insurance must cost.
  23. We had a local driver who competed in the, as I remember, 1957 Daytona Race. He finished something like 15th which he considered very good considering his pit crew had to change tires with a lug wrench, not being able to afford power equipment. Johnny Mackison I think.