Matt Harwood

1933 Buick 90 Series Club Sedan

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I am not too keen on advertising a car being sold by my former business partner, but if any of you are like me and a '33 90-Series Buick is on your must-have list, he has what appears to be a decent one. It's a desirable club sedan in good shape and appears to be mostly original with some fluffing along the way. I don't know details. I will say that if I had not wiped myself out financially with The Car That Shall Not Be Named, I would go over to his shop and try to buy this Buick. Full Classic, extremely rare, desirable club sedan, and in the right kind of condition to buy and fix up and come out ahead later. If it's usable as-is, this is as close to a slam-dunk as you get in the pre-war car world.

 

Don't hem and haw, don't waste time with "If only I had the room," or "My wife won't let me," or "If only I were 5 miles closer!" If you like it, I would be happy to go look at it for you; I'm local and I'm friendly with my ex-partner so he'll let me see it and drive it no problem. I can also help with shipping and logistics. My time is valuable but I'll do this free of charge for a Buick friend who genuinely wants this car.
 

I only list it here because I'm kicking myself that I can't have it, but I would very much like one of my Buick friends to have the opportunity. The price is right at $37,900 and like I said, this is THE early '30s Buick to own and potentially a FANTASTIC car. Let me know if I can help!

 

http://www.vintagemotorcarsusa.com/vehicles/details_new.php?id=592

 

001.jpg

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Wow, that's a great car.  I've always been a fan of the 90 Buicks.

 

I would comment that I don't think all that interior is original, think the seats and back doors at least have been redone.  Still, if it's good mechanically, you could have a ton of fun for only a quarter ton of money with that car.

 

And I do agree, when shipping cost across country is probably 5% of purchase price, if you want it buy it.....

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Fabulous rare car. I have to agree that the upholstery and door panels do not appear to be original, nor is the carpet on the front floor. I wonder if this is the one that was owned by Sandy Jones in northern Colorado. His was all original, but had moth damage on the original upholstery, which could explain why this one has been redone inside. He passed a couple of years ago and the car was for sale by his wife. I would love to own it, but alas, it is beyond my budget unless the seller wanted to take a '32 56-S in trade.

Pete Phillips, BCA #7338

Leonard, TX.

Edited by Pete Phillips (see edit history)

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I believe both of Sandy's cars were limousines or 7-passenger sedans, not club sedans.

 

I should note that I have not seen this car in person and don't know anything about it beyond the fact that I wish I could have it.

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Matt' I agree on the "wish I could have it" comment.  As a good friend States, we make our choices, a lot of people could "choose" to own this, including us, but we make alternate decisions...

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Matt, I quit the hem and haw routine five years ago when I made the decision to send the earnest money check to purchase the late David Corbin's 1939 Roadmaster 81.  I've never looked back. What a companion car to my 1949 Super 51--one that I've owned since 1978. I truly have fun with both of them. We all have a limited time on Earth to enjoy these cars!

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Matt is right. Both of Sandy's Buicks were series 90 limited cars.

I had a chance to ride in the green on several years ago when I visited his home in Ft. Collins.

I found him to be a fine gentleman in every sense of the word and we corresponded regularly.

He was a treasure of information as I brought my '40 LTD out of hibernation.

I know his wife was trying to sell the black one, but I have not learned of her progress.

 

Mike in Colorado

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This was posted over in a Lincoln thread.   Same car?   The black one is a better deal,  but I love the styling.   I'm not a two tone guy but this works, rust and all.  I like the spokes better than the artillery wheels.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Survivor-1933-Buick-91-Club-Sedan-1932-1934-Ford-Coupe-Roadster-SCTA-Push-Car/123852892709?

 

s-l1600.jpg

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The black 1933 Buick series 90 club sedan with Fisher No Draft Ventilation is one powerful super attractive vehicle.  I'd switch the radiator cap with the Isadora Duncan radiator cap used on 1933 Buick cars that cost about $3 new as an accessory. Great story behind that radiator cap. 

 

On the night of September 14, 1927, in Nice, France, Duncan was a passenger in an Amilcar CGSS automobile owned by Benoît Falchetto, a French-Italian mechanic. She wore a long, flowing, hand-painted silk scarf, created by the Russian-born artist Roman Chatov, a gift from her friend Mary Desti, the mother of American film director Preston Sturges. Desti, who saw Duncan off, had asked her to wear a cape in the open-air vehicle because of the cold weather, but she would only agree to wear the scarf. As they departed, she reportedly said to Desti and some companions, "Adieu, mes amis. Je vais à la gloire!" ("Farewell, my friends. I go to glory!"); but according to the American novelist Glenway Wescott, Desti later told him that Duncan's actual parting words were, "Je vais à l'amour" ("I am off to love"). Desti considered this embarrassing, as it suggested that she and Falchetto were going to her hotel for a tryst. Her silk scarf, draped around her neck, became entangled around the open-spoked wheels and rear axle, pulling her from the open car and breaking her neck. Desti said she called out to warn Duncan about the scarf almost immediately after the car left. Desti brought Duncan to the hospital, where she was pronounced dead.

 

The English language was much more pure and with class than today. Sadly the lexicon in modern times has suffered. When was the last time any of you readers used the word "tryst"?  So much more refined and sophisticated than saying "going to her hotel to get f_ _ _ ed". 

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13 hours ago, BucketofBolts said:

The English language was much more pure and with class than today.

 

Yeah, but it reminded me of a guy who got his tie caught in a lathe.

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Nice car - I would say totally new interior and quite a bit of paintwork done over time, but looks like needs new tires and probably many some solid hours of tinkering and it should prove a truly worthy car. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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On 9/21/2019 at 8:23 AM, alsancle said:

AJ I bought that one :) 

 

 

 

On 9/21/2019 at 8:23 AM, alsancle said:

 

 

This was posted over in a Lincoln thread.   Same car?   The black one is a better deal,  but I love the styling.   I'm not a two tone guy but this works, rust and all.  I like the spokes better than the artillery wheels.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Survivor-1933-Buick-91-Club-Sedan-1932-1934-Ford-Coupe-Roadster-SCTA-Push-Car/123852892709?

 

s-l1600.jpg

 

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Good for you Dav.  Whatcha going to do with it?  I think it is very cool but the work needed makes me tired.

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1 hour ago, Davlet said:

 

 

 

 


And I was was gonna mention I actually like the two tone which is usually not my style.

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8 hours ago, alsancle said:

Good for you Dav.  Whatcha going to do with it?  I think it is very cool but the work needed makes me tired.

 

 

Will be rebuild. 

but in cheaper laber place :)

 

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1 minute ago, Davlet said:

 

 

Will be rebuild. 

but in cheaper laber place :)

 

 

Can't be Massachusetts.   What is the cost of shipping to Eastern Europe and what are the labor rates in dollars?   Here is anywhere from 60-100/hr.

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I still kick myself in the arse for selling the all original and extremely solid '34 90 series Club Sedan I had years ago.  But heh I needed money and the 6 grand I got for it made life a bit easier for awhile.

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1 hour ago, Restorer32 said:

I still kick myself in the arse for selling the all original and extremely solid '34 90 series Club Sedan I had years ago.  But heh I needed money and the 6 grand I got for it made life a bit easier for awhile.

 

 

The GOOD OLD DAYS.........when 6 grand would make life easy to live for 12-18 months.........now............three weeks.

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Matt -- In your description of this very fine Buick, you suggest that it is a good candidate "to buy and fix up and come out ahead later."  But it seems in recent years that the notion of profitably speculating via auto restoration has become seriously questionable -- especially in the case of pre-war 4-door-sedans.  However, you're in the biz and you oughta know, so here's a question:   is a plan to "come out ahead" by investing time and money in a sedan of this vintage even remotely realistic?  

 

Thanks!

       ~ Charlie Manes

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Well, I didn't really mean that it would be profitable, only that you could sort it and perform some modest restoration work, and those chores should pay for themselves, more or less. I think the car is desirable and while it doesn't justify a full restoration, I don't think it's at peak value, either. Detail the engine bay, make everything work properly, perhaps freshen a few chrome pieces like the grille, new tires; those are all things that would add enough value to justify doing them. That's all I meant.

 

Ultimately you'd have one of the best-looking closed Buicks that's also a Full Classic, and arguably one of the better road cars of the period. As I said, I'd own that car today if I hadn't wasted all my savings buying a similar Full Classic club sedan that promptly cratered itself in a most expensive way. Yeah, I'd be sorting it, buffing it, and driving the hell out of that Buick next spring. 

 

Just for comparison, this car sold well into the six-figure range not too long ago. And it's brown.

1934-Buick-Series-90_000GK_460x369.jpg

 

 

Heck, this carnival of a Buick brought twice the asking price of the black car I mentioned (I don't care that it was made for the Queen, it's a disaster):

1933-Buick-Series-90-_000BA_459x307.jpg

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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