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Hey Auburnseeker, want another?


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Not mine. Saw it on FB. https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/210833356924831/

1932 Auburn 8-100a
Norco, CA · 18 hours ago · 
$30,000
 
 
  • About This Vehicle
    •  
    • Driven 50,000 miles
    •  
    • Automatic transmission
    •  
    • Exterior color: Tan
    •  
    • Poor condition
    • Seller's Description

      This is a 1932 Auburn two door sedan all original I just want a fair deal the two door sedan with a canvas top

      90470485_644150473031380_3712561398425845760_n.jpg?_nc_cat=108&_nc_sid=3b2858&_nc_ohc=m1vqdbwudlwAX9Xz90T&_nc_ht=scontent-msp1-1.xx&oh=5a132ada3bd7978b64b2cd8485cbdc2c&oe=5EA1EF02

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Love the hot rod headlights.

Think Ed or Matt will notice ?

Why would someone dump a car like that and not at least roll up the windows ?

Seems disrespectful.

Is there such a thing as "condition 6".

Though we've seen worse brought back to be a "star".

All it takes is the love of the mark and $$$$$$$$$$$$$

 

Mike in Colorado

Edited by FLYER15015 (see edit history)
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I think mine was a much better buy. ;)   I will say one positive is it has the pitchfork trim around the grille and that appears intact so that's worth a couple of bucks by itself.  I would say parts car is best. I need some headlight reflectors so this one won't work as a parts car for me.  Darn. 

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He has it for sale on the ACD page on Facebook. Insists it’s worth 35k. Another dreamer. Also says you must restore it, and not hot rod it. Another “easy” restoration. Randy’s car at the 100k price was a bargain! Just don’t tell his wife.....he told her he paid 80!🤫

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Since the Auburn seller is unrealistic, I’ll offer two of my “barn find Pierce Arrow’s” These cars are exceptional bargains, need very little work to enjoy, and are much more valuable than anything you have ever seen offered at auction. Good deal here boys.........you don’t have to pay extra for the barn storage...a totally unnecessary added cost. Both of these cars were parked behind the barn, where local children helped service the car, and local parts dealers stoped by and added all the missing parts. Start the bidding.......I want to get enough to buy a Murphy roadster........SJ!

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Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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1 minute ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

John M. Has been very politely discussing price with seller, but no dice.  He won't entertain $15k, more like 8-10k imho.


It’s a 2500 dollar car......if you want it for parts.

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Mark.........most of that car is now driving around. Manifold, head, and block are all on different cars. It was quite rough, but we saved everything we could. Look close, we actually had to cut down a 14 inch tree to get it out. It was so far down in the dirt we brought my John Deere backhoe to get it out. It was a swamp, so we had to wait for no snow while the ground was frozen. Interesting recovery.

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Gents one has to appreciate this is a VERY rare car, not a run of the mill Ford, Chevy etc, and it is a true AACA CLASSIC.

 1932 was during the depression years and total production of Auburn 2 door broughams was only 1988 units.This number included 6 cyl, 8 cylinder and 12 cylinder cars, that were shipped from the factory. A lot were probably 6 cyl cars and probably very few were 12 cyl cars. How many 8cyl cars were made then, I think very few.

 Yes 30K is way out the top and the car needs a total restoration which wont be cheap, but to buy this as a parts car or to hot rod it will be a shame. It appears to be reasonably complete, and yes the headlights are wrong and there no doubt is other stuff missing or wrong on the car, but where are you going to find another Auburn like this in a hurry.

IMHO, If you bought this car and restored it YOURSELF it will cost probably 20 to 30k plus your time. Fully restored this is a 40 to 50K car, so a sensible price is probably 5 to 6k.

 I would love to find ANY car of this age, in this condition, to restore over in this part of the world. I have been collecting and restoring cars here since the early 70's and have yet to find something this age with any seats or upholstery left, never mind this complete.

 Viv

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1 hour ago, viv w said:

Gents one has to appreciate this is a VERY rare car, not a run of the mill Ford, Chevy etc, and it is a true AACA CLASSIC.

 1932 was during the depression years and total production of Auburn 2 door broughams was only 1988 units.This number included 6 cyl, 8 cylinder and 12 cylinder cars, that were shipped from the factory. A lot were probably 6 cyl cars and probably very few were 12 cyl cars. How many 8cyl cars were made then, I think very few.

 Yes 30K is way out the top and the car needs a total restoration which wont be cheap, but to buy this as a parts car or to hot rod it will be a shame. It appears to be reasonably complete, and yes the headlights are wrong and there no doubt is other stuff missing or wrong on the car, but where are you going to find another Auburn like this in a hurry.

IMHO, If you bought this car and restored it YOURSELF it will cost probably 20 to 30k plus your time. Fully restored this is a 40 to 50K car, so a sensible price is probably 5 to 6k.

 I would love to find ANY car of this age, in this condition, to restore over in this part of the world. I have been collecting and restoring cars here since the early 70's and have yet to find something this age with any seats or upholstery left, never mind this complete.

 Viv

on

 

I have made a good living cutting up "very rare cars", and much higher end units than a production Auburn. Just because something is rare, doesn't mean it has value..........that said, in this market, you could easily buy several of the identical cars for the cost of restoring this one......and not have to wait five to ten years to go for a drive. Send this car to a major shop, and the restoration will run well over 400K. The body style was rather common in 1932....it was a "trendy" body style that year at all the shows.....and almost every car manufacturer mad lots of them. As for "proof" of these comments...........the most common body style that survives for ANY year Pierce Arrow........????????? 1932 Series 54 Club Brougham, yes....there are more of the 1932 Pierce two door cars than any other year or model Pierce.......car to guess how many survive? It was 54 cars at last count. As far as "hard to find" well I have been doing this 40 years, and I am pulling more cars out of barns, garages, sheds, and pole barns in the last five years than I did in the previous 25. And not Ford T's and Dodge Brothers touring cars..........there are plenty of running and driving turn key cars today trading at very fair historical prices............some people just expect a car to fall into their lap........it doesn't happen. We have brought home7 Pierce cars in the last 12 months...........two to sell intact....the others are already cut up for parts.......ant they were ALL much better than the Auburn in this thread.Photos are jest two examples.......the 34 was cut up for parts.........body is being used on a rusty car with bad wood the owner has been working on for years. The green 35 went to someone who is interested in preservation.  

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Here is a 1929 Pierce, with 40K original miles and paint.........and perfect factory upholstery. Always kept inside, no modifications. Won "best original Pierce" at the PAS. national meet. Fantastic car that ran 55 mph all day, no overheating, great oil pressure, well sorted, everything worked. I was asking 38K for it for over two years and had no offers. We drove it over two thousand miles on tours all over the US. Finally sold it to a guy who only like unmolested cars.......and this one was one of the best...........got 32k for it two years ago. Remember...it needed NOTHING. The market is shifting and project cars.....especially "rough, incomplete, bad wood,ect..." are very, very difficult to sell. 

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11 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

John M. Has been very politely discussing price with seller, but no dice.  He won't entertain $15k, more like 8-10k imho.

 

 

Well, if John bought it, at least it would be done correctly and driven regularly..........there probably are less than five buyers on that car over five grand..............and four of them are too old to do it and see the finish line. 

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Correct me if I’m wrong, but the green Pierce Ed had at Hershey was driving and less than the OP car??

 

Heres another comparison, my 15k Pierce-Arrow from eBay... I would much prefer this than 2 Auburn’s in that condition for the same price...

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Mark....you're a great example of someone who actually put in effort, and chased a car down, and "PULLED THE TRIGGER". Way too many people just can't get it done. I bought a Pierce last week sight unseen. Its in my garage up north, and I still haven't got any photos of it yet........

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

some people just expect a car to fall into their lap........it doesn't happen.

Well once in a while it does happen,  but you need to be ready even if it means stretching your finances to make it happen.  Well having a friend in the right places doesn't hurt either. ;) 

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5 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

Well once in a while it does happen,  but you need to be ready even if it means stretching your finances to make it happen.  Well having a friend in the right places doesn't hurt either. ;) 

 

 

Nothing better than getting good cars to good people.............the more you look, the more you find. Would you be interested in a very nice Pierce Arrow?🤔

 

 

I take Auburn trades........after they are sorted...........😷

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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1 minute ago, edinmass said:

 

 

Nothing better than getting good cars to good people.............the more you look, the more you find. Would you be interested in a very nice Pierce Arrow?🤔

 

 

I take Auburn trades........after they are sorted...........😷

Food for thought.  I do have her looking purdy though.  I smile every time I walk in the garage and steal a look at her.  I even find myself sticking my head back in for a second look on the way out the door.  

Kind of like a pretty girl in a sack dress.  With the paint color and touch ups , you look past to see the real beauty.  She could be olive green and I would still have to sneak a peek. ;) 

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12 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

Food for thought.  I do have her looking purdy though.  I smile every time I walk in the garage and steal a look at her.  I even find myself sticking my head back in for a second look on the way out the door.  

Kind of like a pretty girl in a sack dress.  With the paint color and touch ups , you look past to see the real beauty.  She could be olive green and I would still have to sneak a peek. ;) 

 

That's how you know you bought the right car. I advise people who are buying from me not to shop price or what the think they "should" buy or worry about their "investment," but rather to buy the car that simply makes them smile the widest. What other reason is there for owning one of these stupid things?

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13 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

Food for thought.  I do have her looking purdy though.  I smile every time I walk in the garage and steal a look at her.  I even find myself sticking my head back in for a second look on the way out the door.  

Kind of like a pretty girl in a sack dress.  With the paint color and touch ups , you look past to see the real beauty.  She could be olive green and I would still have to sneak a peek. ;) 

 

 

So it seems you are content with your purchase! Glad it brings that much joy to you. I remember well when I landed my "dream car" back twenty years ago.........ten years later it was still as good as the first.

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Just now, Matt Harwood said:

 

That's how you know you bought the right car. I advise people who are buying from me not to shop price or what the think they "should" buy or worry about their "investment," but rather to buy the car that simply makes them smile the widest. What other reason is there for owning one of these stupid things?

 

 

How about being a masochist? 🤯

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2 hours ago, viv w said:

Gents one has to appreciate this is a VERY rare car, not a run of the mill Ford, Chevy etc, and it is a true AACA CLASSIC.

 1932 was during the depression years and total production of Auburn 2 door broughams was only 1988 units.This number included 6 cyl, 8 cylinder and 12 cylinder cars, that were shipped from the factory. A lot were probably 6 cyl cars and probably very few were 12 cyl cars. How many 8cyl cars were made then, I think very few.

 Yes 30K is way out the top and the car needs a total restoration which wont be cheap, but to buy this as a parts car or to hot rod it will be a shame. It appears to be reasonably complete, and yes the headlights are wrong and there no doubt is other stuff missing or wrong on the car, but where are you going to find another Auburn like this in a hurry.

IMHO, If you bought this car and restored it YOURSELF it will cost probably 20 to 30k plus your time. Fully restored this is a 40 to 50K car, so a sensible price is probably 5 to 6k.

 I would love to find ANY car of this age, in this condition, to restore over in this part of the world. I have been collecting and restoring cars here since the early 70's and have yet to find something this age with any seats or upholstery left, never mind this complete.

 Viv

 

Ed, I am with Viv on this one. We all realise you are in a very well connected place in the hobby and as a double bonus in a part of the world where an abundance of desirable cars exist. Unfortunately the other 80% of us live in a situation where this is not the case.  My geographic situation is less than ideal but really I am only 3000 miles and

a international border from the land of plentiful barns and sheds, but Viv more than 8000 miles and a bit of an ocean away.

In theory either of us could jump on an airplane, rent a car , book a hotel room, arrange a viewing , arrange transport for our new prize , pay through the nose at both the currency exchange and the Customs shed , and so on. But the reality is that neither Viv or myself are millionaires.

In my part of the world there hasn't been a PA for sale that I am aware of for like a decade.

I think it is wonderful for you that you have so many of the things that you can look at  them in the same sort of way that I might look at 1966 Ford Galaxy's .  But please bear in mind what seems to be a every week event for you

is more like a once in a lifetime dream for others.

 

Greg in Canada

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I agree with Ed.  There is alot out there especially if you are willing to buy from a distance.  You just have to figure if it's worth it overall to you.    I'm in Upstate NY.  My 36 Cord came from CA,  My 60 Corvette came from Oregon. My Dodge Roadster came from ME,  which is over 6 hours through the back woods to here one way. 

I do understand the cross border creates a whole different issue,  but it's like everything it's more of an exception that a rule for Many members as they live in the States.  I have sold several cars to guys over seas though and they seemed to have no problem arranging everything including the sea transport.  It's all in how bad you want it. 

The Auburn must have been meant to be as that was only 3 hours away,  but I still bought it sight unseen and had it shipped. For what shipping cost,  it doesn't make sense to hook up a trailer for pretty much anything unless my Dad really wants to go along for an adventure. 

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Definitely any distance problem can be solved if enough money is spent. The people shipping cars overseas are in all likely hood not enthusiastic restore it yourselfers. Really the only point I am trying to make is that cars like Auburns, PA's , 20's Lincoln's and many others are actually very rare in many parts of the world.

There will be people who are strongly interested in cars like these in these further flung locations. But only a handful of these people will be in a financial position to buy from a distance.

 

Greg

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I understand the “early car dessert “ and border issue. Cars can be had for very reasonable money. You just need to look. Shipping is just a cost of playing. As far as money goes.......I’m a working guy. My everyday driver is a 06 Ford Focus, a 97 S-10 Chevy. I go cheap on every day cars so I can justify a tow vehicle and multiple trailers. It’s all about priorities. Without children to support........a choice I made, I can vacation and play with more toys. I do ok......but then again, I work many hours a week.........more than most. Also remember unlike most, I LIVE THIS HOBBY 24/7/365 ..............it’s my work, it’s my play, and my passion in life. I have a 15 Ford T, and enjoy it just as much as my 36 V-12 Pierce. And I had a much harder time finding a good T than I do finding a Pierce.

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I shouldn't be looking at projects of any sort. As has been pointed out many times on these forums a car that is sorted and ready to go is always the best overall deal. Its a way of dreaming about a vintage car that is priced out of reach regardless of condition. Matt's currently offered Marmon is a good example. Super car at a price that I am sure represents 

a very good value for money proposition. In my personal situation even that very reasonable price represents about 15 years of my post retirement hobby budget once it is sitting in my driveway. So a bank loan and a divorce. The car is a nice dream, the reality a nightmare.

 

Thanks for your perspective Ed. I do appreciate your devotion to the big classics. And it takes a special person that can have old cars for both a living and a hobby. I tried it when I was younger, worked as a mechanic in a general service shop , plus later in a restoration shop. My hobby cars became 

neglected. It just wasn't in the cards to work on the job all day plus on my own stull in off hours. It wasn't until I became a Ships Engineer that I could return any sort of focus to the old cars. And I know a reasonable bit about long hours. When I retired I had over 5 months paid leave that represented the overtime I had worked during the previous 4 years.

I run my person budget much the same way it sounds like you run yours.  I only have the one son but yes kids are a very expensive undertaking. And The West Coast of Canada is a stupidly expensive place for a retired person to live, I would like to move but that much like a the above Marmon purchase would also be the first step in 

the divorce process.

Old cars are definitely my play and passion, I just decided to turn the work in a very similar but separate direction. It will just have to be MGA's { I have owned them both for decades so all in cost less than an engine rebuild today }my very cheap Lola{ by Lola standards , about 1 / 10 of Matt's Marmon although it will need a further 5 G's or so } and my Staver { total time and money pit }. I will be luckier than many if they are all done within my lifetime.

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

I bought a Pierce last week sight unseen. Its in my garage up north, and I still haven't got any photos of it yet........


Now that takes some balls!

 

Call me lucky that it was an 8 I came home with, but I looked for something like it for a few years. At one point I thought I had an earlier PA car through a person here that I will forever consider a dishonorable seller. He claimed he was commissioned to sell two cars, but pressed for higher offers until he accepted mine, then said that the owner sold it out from under... I still say he used my offer to get a better one from some other person. I thought about smearing him publicly but what would it change? Live and learn, there’s A-holes in every hobby...

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39 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

I have sold several cars to guys over seas though and they seemed to have no problem arranging everything including the sea transport. 


Yep, my original model A Ford was last seen driving into the Swiss Alps, quite a distance from Maine and the buyer was pleased... but we’re discussing a very different animal... I don’t want to see it rodded, but in its current condition I sure as heck wouldn’t want more than  around $7500 into it, and even then it would have to be a labor of love as getting it roadworthy will be expensive without adding labor into the bill... and this is recent experience talking.

 

 

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I did get photos of the cars i bought at a distance and bought it taking the gamble. The vette had excellent photos, literally over 100 of it on a lift.  The Cord had a few cell phone close ups that were crappy and the Auburn had a few far away shots.  The Dodge Roadster I only got a couple of photos of and they weren't good.  It's just the level of risk you are willing to take.  (remember rarely will you ever lose every penny on a car you paid for it as Matt said) I could still have a near boat anchor under the hood of my Auburn but I was willing to take the risk.  Figure the worst,  hope for the best and figure it all in the equation.  I decided a long time ago I liked the odd stylish cars and that's what I wanted to play with so I knew I had to work hard and find a way to make it a reality.  Really no vacations,  living Frugally (driving my 15 year old truck) and always trying to position myself better with each car to get to my end game.  Also buying needy but not complete piles of projects was a good way to enjoy but not get as invested as with Restored show cars. (not that I wouldn't like to but realized it's just not in the cards)   I've never had a car that was better than a 2 and most were in the 3's.  Just as much or more fun.  I walk through a show and see cars I know guys have over 100G in.  Not even anything real special.  I tell the wife I could have one flawless car like that or the 4 I have in the garage right now.  Well actually 5 but that would push me over the line a little.  All bought as 4's or 5's and brought up to 3 ish condition over time. 

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17 hours ago, FLYER15015 said:

 

Why would someone dump a car like that and not at least roll up the windows ?

Seems disrespectful.

Via this Auburn Brougham: Issue is more that the entire roof has been caved in and is open to the sky (though I agree to windows needing rolled up or mostly rolled up on things that are stored) - it still may be a car that would give you a nicer steering wheel and dashboard than many 99% of the surviving cars, but how would you know that through all the dirt. 

 

Sidenote:  When you see an Auburn like this one with a open roof it is most likely from people standing on it or something falling on it, as car still is generally looks too solid otherwise for the issue. 

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5 hours ago, viv w said:

If you bought this car and restored it YOURSELF it will cost probably 20 to 30k plus your time. Fully restored this is a 40 to 50K car, so a sensible price is probably 5 to 6k.

 

I have never figured out how to do a CCCA car for less than like 60K when it needs comprehensive restoration (though is still a decent enough car to begin with) // or 80K plus when I have to put my hands on literally every single part of the car - and I am pretty frugal and pretty handy.   And to do a car to win AACA and CCCA awards that is a whole other story. 

 

And, I have bought plenty of cars that people have done partial substandard work on/cheated here and there and put 20K-30K plus in those just straitening out work that should have been better to begin with. 

 

Your chrome plating bill will be pushing 15K alone for a late 20's-30's Auburn sedan and pushing 20K or plus for an open car - and again if you want to really win it will be higher. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, edinmass said:

 

 

Well, if John bought it, at least it would be done correctly and driven regularly..........there probably are less than five buyers on that car over five grand..............and four of them are too old to do it and see the finish line. 

Well, I defended the owner and tied to drive reason into him, but I was sidetracked in owner's delusion that car was a nicer than it is and had a pretty respectable interior in it and ....  He made no mention that the roof had been caved in (and I could go out and lay in my dog's hole of defiance in the yard and be more clean than I would be just looking at this Auburn).  A lot of people were trying to reason with him regarding 15K - well "that shipped sailed" and he should have grabbed onto one of those offers back in the summer when economy was better - personally,  I think you are now talking a 8k to 10k car and someone may go 12K, but ... - AND IT IS NOT GOING TO BE ME as if I can going to restore something this car gone I have my eye more toward an Auburn V-12 (and yes I like sedans) or a Cord L-29.  

 

Sidenote:  This Auburn Brougham may have a dash, steering wheel, or ... in it that is better than 99% of surviving cars or ... - some other redeeming feature(s) - BUT HOW WOULD YOU BE ABLE TO TELL VIA ALL ITS CURRENT ABUSE. 

 

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Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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24 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

I have never figured out how to do a CCCA car for less than like 60K when it needs comprehensive restoration (though is still a decent enough car to begin with) // or 80K plus when I have to put my hands on literally every single part of the car - and I am pretty frugal and pretty handy.   And to do a car to win AACA and CCCA awards that is a whole other story. 

 

And, I have bought plenty of car that people have done partial substandard work on/cheated here and there and put 20K-30K plus in those just straitening out work that should have been better to begin with. 

 

Your chrome plating bill will be pushing 15K alone for a late 20's-30's Auburn sedan and pushing 20K or plus for an open car - and again if you want to really win it will be higher. 

 

I have a car that's half restored already, including chassis and engine and most of the bodywork. I will gladly pay someone $30,000 right now to finish it for me, no hesitation.

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A lot of ships have sailed in the last 12 months.   Prior to Corona decent cars were bringing less and project cars became non-saleable unless the seller realized they were selling wholesale parts bolted together.

 

Not just the low and middle stuff.   There are many cars there were easy million dollar sales 5 years ago that are 500k now.

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I agree that Viv's cost estimates seem very low. I have a feeling he has access to very reasonably priced labor.  Things like plating may be cheaper in Africa as well, I doubt overheads are anything like North American or Western European costs.

 

Ed, the old car desert isn't just a Western Canadian thing. I look on Seattle's craigslist from time to time. Really no better than my side of the border. Oregon and California do start to get better but as always as the distance increases the overall cost of purchase 

invariably goes up. Not really a factor for those in the say $50,000.00 potential purchases and up bracket, but that leaves out quite a few of us.      The Eastern areas of the U.S. are the old car supply gold standard.

Matt, I love your Marmon, would you take a 19 year old son in trade ?  Unfortunately so far he has shown little interest in old cars. He does think Nissan Sylvia's are cool however.

Greg

 

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