Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

Recommended Posts

I got a call this evening from Crin, my paint guy. I posted some photos of the body after he painted it three weeks ago and I thought it looked pretty good. Well, he said he wasn't satisfied with the paint and he sanded it down, put on a new basecoat and then cleared it with a new clear formula that he really likes. It dries more slowly and seems to even out the clear so there is far less orange-peel. It still needs sanding and buffing, but it looks like a pretty good start to say the least.

8_zps7d80e85e.jpg

7_zps98947c0a.jpg

6_zpsecfa6111.jpg

4_zpsd8dbb995.jpg

10_zps32365e01.jpg

9_zps3159208b.jpg

You can see in this shot of the cowl that there are still some slight waves that will sand out during color sanding and buffing.

1_zps042a473e.jpg

3_zps0e2c97d0.jpg


Sorry about the photos not showing up before!<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For your chassis, what are you planning on using for the powdercoat process? The reason I ask, a few shops around here do a phosphate wash, and at least one offers the option to use a zinc rich base layer powder (primer) and then a finish coat (according to their website). I'm a few years away from getting my chassis done though... How did the hood tops work for you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's exactly the process we use and that's what was done to the body. Stripped down to bare metal, phosphate wash and an zinc rich primer applied - I'm sure Dick posted the pictures of all of that. Then a primer surfacer was applied, sanded then the base and clear coats were applied (a few times because I just wasn't happy with it).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few days ago, when the temperature was hovering at 2 degrees above zero, we brought the body back to my garage. It's fairly heavy, but four of us could lift the body off the truck and onto the stand I built a while ago. When it warms up, Crin and I will color sand and buff it out.

IMG_3272_zpsec860ab3.jpg

IMG_3277_zps58107f51.jpg

IMG_3280_zps82dcb404.jpg

IMG_3281_zpsb1df6ecb.jpg

Now that the frame is off to the powder coaters, I'm begiining the tedious task of getting all the frame parts ready for paint. I took all the springs apart yesterday. A pretty simple and straightforward job. The biggest hassle was all the grease still hanging on to everything. Phil kept her well lubed, which means all the bearing surfaces are in great shape, but it sure is a mess to take apart!

IMG_3282_zps6ec870ca.jpg

IMG_3286_zpsd72cff02.jpg

One thing I did notice - some of the bolts that run through the spring clamps (The U-shaped brackets that keep the ends of the leaves together) have thin metal tubes that I think are spacers meant to keep the ears of the clamps from bending in. You can see one in this photo.

IMG_3302_zps3cfa991f.jpg

But other clamps didn't have them. And the driver's side front spring didn't have any at all, as in this photo, leading me to believe that it had been taken apart for some reason in the past. Notice how the tops of the clamps are bent in due to the lack of a spacer.

IMG_3293_zps142082ea.jpg


Everything came apart quite easily and I had all the springs taken apart in about two hours. They weren't as rusty as I'd expected and should clean up just fine.

IMG_3290_zpsab83a216.jpg

IMG_3310_zps700f5c22.jpg

IMG_3308_zps43affb31.jpg


This little item on the front end of the driver's side front spring is a damper to improve steering control. It has two large coil springs inside. I'll take better shots as I restore it.

IMG_3294_zps91d411f6.jpg

Pretty boring stuff, but it's all part of the job.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing boring about this at all. We are loving all of the closeups and details that you are sharing with us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phil kept her well lubed, which means all the bearing surfaces are in great shape, but it sure is a mess to take apart!

Sorry about that...I'm a grease monkey with OCD!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like the others, I have been most impressed and inspired by this thread. Fantastic work and thanks for sharing. But I was particularly interested in the contrast between our weather conditions. I am preparing my DA doors for painting and it was 43 deg C (that's 109 deg F I think) when I came in from the shed for lunch! I won't be going back to the shed for a while!!

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi John,

I know what you mean. Its 40c in Melbourne today. Hard to go out in the garage when the sun hits the 3 steel doors and its 45c in there !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same over in West Aust We are having days in the high 30s centigrade and on top of that I ame recovering from a severe bout or pneumonia so not a lot has been achieved in my shed for the last 2 weeks I am slowly on the mend though which is good Cheers Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got photos of my newly restored starter and generator from Jason Smith at Advanced Electrical Rebuilders. Looks like I'm going to have to up the quality of the rest of my restoration about 500 percent to match this. All new insides as well, so they should work as good as they look. He's sending them out today.

photo1_zps7727e064.jpg

photo3_zpsd6634ed3.jpg

photo4_zpse4bb26d9.jpg

photo5_zps63c95560.jpg

photo2starter_zps3c2d3777.jpg

photo4starter_zps0207c990.jpg

photo3starter_zps0ce4e9f3.jpg

My engine is due to be finished by February 14th and I just sent my Floating Power motor mounts off to Tom Hannaford to be revulcanized. With the frame coming back in the next two weeks blasted and powdercoated, I should be ready for some reassembly next month with clean shiny parts!

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just curious about the bands on the ends of those units...I had always thought that they were painted black like the rest of the bodies of the units. It's just that I have never seen one shiny.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For what it's worth the bands on my '32DL's starter and generator are painted black, as is the arm on the starter that engages the pedal linkage.

I know that both were rebuilt by the previous owner about 4-5 years ago, but it doesn't look like the outside surfaces were repainted at that time. Who knows what might happened earlier?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 29 Plymouth had unpainted bands but I doubt if they were ever polished. These units on my 32 were black and looked original, but as Phil says, who knows what happened earlier. When I first took the bands off to look inside, the paint just fell off leaving an unpainted surface so I don't know the real answer. I guess I can paint them black if I don't like the "bling" look, but they sure do look pretty! The best part is everything is new - bolts, windings, brushes, starter relay, wiring - so my electrical system should be dependable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In addition to the shiny brush cover band, I was wondering about the Delco-Remy tag. I've heard that all the early ones on Mopar were black like the one in your photo but the ones on my '33 Plymouth are red and show no evidence of having been altered. Any idea about what years had what colors on those tags?

p.s. There is a fellow in the Pacific Northwest who makes electronic regulators attached to replacement brush bands so the electronics are hidden within the generator. I installed one of his devices in my Delco-Remy generator maybe 10 or 15 years ago. Makes all the difference in the world on a car that sits all week in the garage and then is driven on fairly long tours on weekends. It is really difficult to get the third brush adjustment right so the battery gets fully charged but not over charged under those conditions. I'm really, really, happy with the regulator. And all I have to do is put the original brush band on and reconnect the third brush wire to put it back to stock if I ever want.

Edited by ply33 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My tags were black and as far as I know they are the original tags. We discovered my tags also said just Anderson Indiana rather than the more common Dayton - Anderson tags. My 29 Plymouth also had black tags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is what's on mine (which I feel looks original) and what I shared with Dick to help him confirm what's likely proper for a '32 DL.

post-61720-143142370226_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now