Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

Recommended Posts

There has been times in my life I have been so poor that I couldn't even afford to pay attention Some how we manage to cope and carry on. With me having a wonderfull and very supportive wife that also loves the old cars is a great bonus. If I could afford it I would send you a few grand as you would not believe how much encouragement this post has given me in the restoration of my car. Money cannot buy that sort of kick start that your post on Daphnies refurbishment has given me. Thank you from the bottom of my heart and I sincerely hope that we will be able to catch up in Detroit in 2014 Cheers Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for the kind words. I hope I didn't come off as too much of a crybaby. It is what it is and I'll continue on with the low cost aspects of the restoration for the time being - if there is such a thing as "low cost" when it comes to these great old cars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not having much money just motivates me to learn how to do things myself that I thought otherwise I could not do. It is truly a gift being poor at times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for this great thread. What a great car this will be. The tools and know how shown in the pics of this thread are very inspiring to all of us. ;)

Rod

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the kind comments and the encouragement - it's greatly appreciated. Now on to more entertaining matters - the resurrection of Daphne.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

My brother flew out from his home in Denver and we drove to Hershey from my place in Illinois. Nice drive, plenty of sunshine and a chance to catch up as we don't see each other that often. The weather was good on Wednesday and we parked and hit the Green field first, contacting Larry (yirgaman) who had everything waiting for us. All the items were as advertised - a nice, relined gas tank, new king pins and the interior door handle I needed. Larry threw in a spring and escutcheon which was really nice.

IMG_2965_zpsd6708de2.jpg

While there I noticed a glass case filled with other small goodies.

IMG_2966_zps3d6300b8.jpg

Despite having a tail light, these were so much better than mine, so I bought one - for less than I paid for my rough one. Thanks Larry!

IMG_3035_zpsc04e540a.jpg


Larry's space was at the North end of the Green Field and near the cross walk so I managed to carry everything back to the car without much of a problem. Then it was on to the South Chocolate Field to hook up with Jim (sandbarfarm 31) and pick up a radiator. It was advertised as coming from a 30,000 mile car that had been rodded and it sure met those standards. I won't know for sure until I take it to the radiator shop for a checkout, but it looked good to me.

IMG_3027_zps3a3a079c.jpg

Luckily, Jim had a dolly and we made the long, long trip back to the car.

We walked around some more and I managed to find a set of spring shackles and pick up lots of cards from restoration suppliers and chrome shops. We spotted this Stanley Steamer near the Car Corral.

IMG_2969_zpsc5105145.jpg

IMG_2970_zps94239848.jpg

IMG_2973_zpsa830c30f.jpg

My brother found a car he really liked in the car corral - a 1932 Chevrolet, all original, with 19,000 miles. He was tempted, but his small garage and transport problems made it impossible, but he wanted that car!

IMG_3010_zpsb71992ff.jpg

Then the rains came. We headed for the Coker Tire space and I got a big discount on six 5.50 - 18 Firestone blackwalls and saved myself a ton is shipping costs. Thankfully, they had wheeled cars available, and we made another long journey back to the car.

IMG_2999_zpsbd55b093.jpg

Along the way, we spotted Wayne Carini of Chasing Classic Cars fame trying to cover up his big, open cars before the rain ruined the leather upholstery.

IMG_3008_zpsbf125f54.jpg

IMG_3006_zps04f059b9.jpg

We got the tires back to the car, slipping and sliding down the grassy hill of the parking lot, and then made the trek back to Coker to return the cart. By that time we were both exhausted and headed back to the motel for some well deserved rest.

The rain dampened things for the next two days, so we attended the Dodge Brothers Club dinner on Friday night and headed home on Saturday. A great, if slightly wet trip, and I picked up some much needed items for the restoration.

IMG_3024_zpsd4d3985c.jpg

IMG_3022_zps927a9e44.jpg

IMG_3021_zps28f7d56e.jpg

IMG_3039_zps3dcaf1a2.jpg

IMG_3026_zpsa59f434a.jpg<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>Back home from Hershey, it was time to tackle the frame. Although we had powerwashed everything at Ed's, there is still a mountain of grease and dirt everywhere. I spread out the tarps and got to work.

IMG_3040_zpsaedafb16.jpg

I made the pleasant discovery that the rear spring shackles looked almost brand new. I have the feeling this car was gone over mechanically some time before I bought it. Since Phil and I probably didn't put more than 4,000 miles on her, collectively, things seem to be in pretty good shape.

I began disassembly of the front axle. The biggest problem was getting the totally rusted cotter pins out. A real pain in the you know what. Everything else broke loose with a bit of muscle power and a long breaker bar.

IMG_3041_zpsca521c9e.jpg

I got everything off the driver's side. The brake linings need replacing. I'm hoping the drums can be turned - they look okay, but I won't know until I get them into the shop for turning. The brake hoses were toast, the rubber rotten and the fittings corroded. The lines themselves, which I thought were copper, are actually copped coated steel and have rusted away to nothing. Total replacement of everything required, plus new brake cylinders and springs.

IMG_3034_zps85e66857.jpg

Oddly, the driver's side kingpin seems solid and the spindle moves smoothly, while the passenger side pin is shot, with lots of back and forth movement. I'm not sure how that happened, but I'm replacing both with the king pins I got at Hershey.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

The Delco shocks still work, which amazed me. I'm hoping the shafts are still smooth and un-pitted. I plan to replace the seal, and, if the shafts are okay, it should be an easy rebuild. I need to source the rubber grommets for the arm mounting points.

Still lots of work to do on the passenger side. More details and close up photos when I get the entire front end apart.

IMG_3030_zps808a537a.jpg

IMG_3029_zpsd82a6579.jpg<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

I need to get new bearings and seals for the front wheels. I don't want to make the same mistake that Phil did in 1980 and destroy the seals by taking them out and then finding out that I can't get new ones. :D Anybody have a good source?<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice looking collection of parts you got there! Thanks for posting the Stanley pics, I love those old steam cars.

Keith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We took out all the interior wood from the body in preperation for blasting. The only structural wood in a DL sedan is the floorboards. The wood around the tops of the door and rear window is there for attaching the upholstery. I restored the wood in a 29 Plymouth - it had all wood framing with the sheet metal tacked on to the wood frame. What a nightmare that was!

IMG_3047_zps2bdd719d.jpg

IMG_3045_zpsc81f4fc7.jpg

Confirmed that my car is an original DL with black body paint.

IMG_3043_zpsefb6ad2b.jpg


The DL's body then went off to Coberaa Custom Powdercoating in Aniston, Illinois. First all traces of old paint were removed from the body. this is a Delicate process that has to be done correctly or the body panels can be badly warped.

1932_Dodge_1_Ext_0042_zps7574240b.jpg

1932_Dodge_1_Ext_0043_zpsd331e441.jpg

1932_Dodge_1_Ext_0044_zps247972da.jpg

Then the body was put through five cleaning processes to make sure all the grit and dirt was removed from the metal. It was then cleaned of all wax and grease and finally etched in preparation for the powdercoating. That's not water, but a chemical cleaning bath.

1932_Dodge_1_Ext_0046_zpsfc1198a4.jpg

1932_Dodge_1_Ext_0047_zps04ed1bdd.jpg

Then the body was powdercoated with a special paintable primer coating.

1932_Dodge_1_Ext_0051_zpsd3d67222.jpg

Now it's ready for a coat of primer sealer, followed by the final coat of black.

The other parts of the car have also been blasted and coated.

1932_Dodge_1_Ext_0050_zpsa323c27e.jpg

1932_Dodge_1_Ext_0048_zps15932a3f.jpg

Once I finish disassembling the frame, it will be blasted and powdercoated satin black.

IMG_3040_zpsaedafb16.jpg



<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taking the frame apart this weekend. Brakes looked in reasonable shape. new wheel cylinders are available and will be purchased. The linings will be replaced and I plan to buy new springs.

IMG_3053_zpsf764e04f.jpg

In another thread I asked some questions about the brake drums. I think they will work although a guy at a local auto store told me he thought they looked "thin." Some minor scoring that I think can be "skimmed" out by turning the drums.

IMG_3055_zpsdcf3c093.jpg

IMG_3056_zps330c26b0.jpg

The drums have an inspection port so you can correctly adjust the brakes. Adjusting early Chrysler Corp. brakes has always been a tough job without special tools. These little inspection ports allow you to see the clearance between the pads and drums all around the drum. Now if I can only get the totally rusted screws that hold the port plate on to come free! I have the feeling I'll have to drill out the flat head screws and re-tap the holes.




<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>Back fenders in paint. still need to be color sanded and buffed out.

IMG_3072_zpse613f2a5.jpg

IMG_3071_zpsf582d371.jpg<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking very, very good!

I haven't heard of a powder coat that was used as a paint primer. Interesting concept. I guess you have to have the metal in good shape with no filler needed before you do that. . .

You might try the electrolytic rust removal method on those drums. Good chance the screws on your adjusting cover plate(s) will just come off after that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"You might try the electrolytic rust removal method on those drums. Good chance the screws on your adjusting cover plate(s) will just come off after that."

Good idea, ply33, I'm going to give that a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The progress being made is very impressive. Your target completion of early next year should be achievable.

As to the Chrysler brakes isn't the Ammco 1750 the brake centering tool and drum micrometer that could be used on a Dodge? The Ply33 website shows how to use this on the Plymouths. They show up on Ebay from time to time. I have one but it is missing the piece that enables it to be used as a drum micrometer. It can be used to center the shoes.

This restoration is a good inspiration to the rest of us.

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Ammco is the tool of choice, but these view ports allow you to center the drums without using the tool. You can open the port and measure the clearance with a feeler gauge. I looked for an Ammco tool when I had my 48 Plymouth, but never found one I could afford. The instruction book for my 29 Plymouth said to use a cutaway brake drum ( a factory part) to adjust the brakes. I assume that my drums with their little view-port was the next step up in brake adjustment, followed by the Ammco tool.

<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just about have the frame stripped down - front and rear axles off<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>, springs removed and various bolt-on pieces loosened and ready to take off.

The springs look good and a simple disassembly, blasting and repainting should do. All the shackles - front and rear - are in great shape and will not need to be replaced. Good news as they are unusual and kind of hard to find. You can see the "studs" or whatever they are called are round, nor worn and not pitted.

IMG_3076_zps1d08f3b3.jpg

IMG_3081_zpsb416667a.jpg

IMG_3083_zpsaa3b8795.jpg

IMG_3084_zps4d2a6a7e.jpg

IMG_3085_zps10476902.jpg

I got front suspension off and ran into a problem. The pitman arm is so close to the frame it's impossible to get a conventional puller in behind the arm to pull it off. The hooks or "grabbers" on my puller won't fit between the arm and the frame.

IMG_3075_zps75fe09a5.jpg

Any suggestions? I was thinking about something like this: http://www.walmart.com/ip/OTC-8150-Conical-Pitman-Arm-Puller-for-Light-Trucks/16481266

or: http://www.matcotools.com/catalog/product/PA643/PITMAN-ARM-PULLER/

These don't work: http://www.harborfreight.com/tie-rod-and-pitman-arm-puller-1752.html

I hope I can find a local auto store that has a correct type to rent. Until I get the arm off, I can't take the frame to be power coated.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the "new" radiator back from the shop Friday. It tested out perfect - no leaks, plenty of flow, all "fins" in good shape. Steve, the radiator guy at Al's Radiator in St. Louis, Missouri, said it took awhile to get some loose rust out, but once he hot tanked it and ran water through it for a bit, everything flushed out perfectly. My Hershey purchase turned out to be a good one.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

IMG_3079_zps25d7618f.jpg

76a3fb1d-e8ed-4061-8977-2da61ef603f6_zps<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A shot of the wood framework around the back window. Mostly in good shape except for the passenger side "curve" that I'll have to remake. I plan to replace the screws as they are rusty, give it a light sanding, a quick coat of black enamel, and it should be ready to go.

IMG_3091_zps6951fed5.jpg

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a good one. You may try a gear puller if the others don't work....gets into really tight areas. I recall using a pickle fork on my '31.

post-37352-143142259331_thumb.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried a pickle fork on mine and it didn't budge. They tend to be a bit rough on the steering box if you're not careful. That gear puller might work.

<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I tried a pickle fork on mine and it didn't budge. They tend to be a bit rough on the steering box if you're not careful.
Yes...you have to make sure you're not gherkin too hard with it. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Phil....yer making it awfully hard for me to type this after that comment! Taylormade, it almost looks like your pitman arm is cracked in the photo?!?!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the right side of the arm ? I see what you mean Keiser is does doesn't it. Interesting if its just grease or it is a crack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used this tool when my Dad and I replaced worn out universal joints on center pivot gear boxes. I think Dad got his at NAPA. They were always almost up against a gear box. Because they ran in wet condititions, they were on that shaft for several years and really rusted on. These were made out of good metal. We would get them started wedging it in between the two and hit the end of the tool with a hammer driving it in. Wahlah...it's off! :)

Good luck

Rod van Pelt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now