Spinneyhill

Members
  • Content Count

    6,737
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Spinneyhill last won the day on May 8

Spinneyhill had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

1,376 Excellent

1 Follower

About Spinneyhill

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 01/27/1956

Profile Information

  • Gender:
    Not Telling
  • Location:
    Tauranga, New Zealand

Converted

  • Biography
    1930 Dodge Brothers 8
    1939 Studebaker Coupe Express

Recent Profile Visitors

4,784 profile views
  1. When I was an ignorant youngster (not much different to now, some say!), I had a Transit van. The rear wheel seals kept failing and it took me a while to work out why - movement of course. The shoes were well oiled with diff. oil. I thought I would be clever and wash them in petrol until it came clean, then burn it in petrol. Yeah, right. The brakes were still lousy. Of course, after fixing the movement ( and replacing the LH thread nut I had split getting it off as a RH thread) and replacing seals plus brake cylinder and shoes, it was MUCH better. Still a pile of rubbish, but the brakes were a lot better.
  2. You will need one designed for an engine at least as big as yours. The 170 carb. will not be good.
  3. It seems to me that you are up against the age-old problem with modified cars. What is it made of? When you come to repair something, what is it you need? Without documentation, it can become very difficult to know what you have without a bit of knowledge or knowledgeable friends. Clearly the body is modified. The heavy V8 will mean the front suspension will be modified - replaced might be a better word. The horsepower of the engine means the rear end will have been swapped for something that will handle it. The gearbox and drive shaft will have been replaced for the same reason. Because of the extra weight and speed of the car, the brakes will be replaced - no doubt as part of the suspension and axle replacements. The chassis, if it is the original, will have been strengthened too, to handle the extra weight and dynamic loads from going faster. We have already seen how it has been shortened at the rear. It seems clear to me that you will have nothing of the original running gear, suspension, steering, brakes, maybe even gauges. Originally it had a 196 cu. in. 4 cylinder engine. Much of it is probably not even Plymouth, let alone Mopar.
  4. this one might work: https://www.vbeltsupply.com/c47-classic-belt.html
  5. The specification is the inside length, the outside width, depth and the angle of the sides. If you have an old one, measure it, even take it with you. Dunlop Fan Belt and Radiator Hose Recommendation Catalogue about 1946 show 1935 Stude Dictator 6 with belt V60, same as 1934, of 46-9/16 x 53/64 x 17/32 -- 42o. Also fitted to Buicks, Chryslers, Citroen, De Soto, Dodge, Essex, Fargo, Hudson, International, Massey Harris, Plymouth, Rockne, Terraplane, Twin City of various years. "Automotive Interchangeability" by the Automotive Publishing Co., 1933-42, gives 4 "master fan belts". Studebaker 1933-35 Pres., Comm. and Dict. use belt 4 = "Plymouth 6 1933-42" and from Dunlop that is the V60!
  6. I asked the internet. Here is one: https://dcmclassics.com/27-Fuel-System?id_category=27&n=75 Will a '39 tank fit? https://www.tanksinc.com/index.cfm/page/ptype=product/product_id=349/category_id=68/mode=prod/prd349.htm
  7. That sounds a lot like what we called "malthoid". It was used as a damp proof course under house foundations, under the bearers on top of the piles. Roof building paper may be similar? It broke when cold but could be bent when warm-hot. Smelly stuff - "tar" may have been coal tar, which today is known as a toxin. You may be able to buy a bituminous paint and make something from gasket paper or similar?
  8. If the speedo stops turning, the coil forming the inner cable will be wound tight and then break at the weakest point, perhaps at the bottom where it is shaped for the fitting? Looking at a picture of what purports to be a Dictator dash, it is a Stewart Warner speedo? Mine is too. The inner gets harder and harder to turn as the body swells. It can be fixed.
  9. ....When cold. 60-70 lb.ft.
  10. Does the speedo actually turn in the dash with no resistance? Mine broke too. The speedo is Zamac diecast and it swells with time, eventually stopping the speedo turning. A broken cable is the result. The warning is wild swings of the speedo needle or tumbler. Also, how much oil is there inside the cable outer? If it has oil in it and dust can get in, it will clog up with dust (oil is a wetting agent) and break. Is there a sharp kink in the cable? Shouldn't be. Show us the speedo body and we may immediately know the solution.
  11. If you want it searchable electronically, you will need to scan with OCR. @Stevemo has posted several hundred documents at https://archive.org/details/@steverontario?&sort=-publicdate&page=2 with OCR. They are very good. Send him a p.m. for information? It seems to me if you want to do it properly, you need to scan it one page at a time, one after the other, as good as possible. Probably no more than 300 dpi is enough; 150 dpi is good enough to print. You can print a .pdf file as a "booklet" in landscape, which will print four pages on a sheet (two each side) in correct order for you to staple the middle. I did my manuals and printed them double sided on A4 portrait and bound them with one of these things: The problem with these bindings is that they catch others on the shelf. I have also put the printed pages in ring binders. But the ultimate for reference is @Stevemo's OCR searchable files. They are very big, though, like several hundred MB for a big document. Luckily OCR has improved a lot in the last 20 years and his are very good.
  12. New gasket? head and deck perfectly flat? Just the gasket. That is all they used in the factory.
  13. Higher octane fuel burns more slowly than lower octane fuel. You will find the exhaust side of the engine gets quite a bit hotter - it is may even be still burning as it goes into the exhaust. You may even have valve trouble. Your car was made for, what, 53 octane? Or maybe 63 octane? Use the lowest octane you can find.