Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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It will be beautiful and you will make it by June 2014!! I really appreciate your detailed pictures and narration. Thanks for taking your time to post. frank

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I spent what may be my last day at Ed's Saturday. as some of you may know, I'm doing a book and a video on the restoration. I wanted to document Ed installing the replacement rocker panel he made the last time I was there. When I arrived, Ed showed me the work he had done on the interior rocker section.

It used to look like this:

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Now it looks like this:

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Ed replaced all but the center section. Now both sides match and are solid steel.

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Ed fill welded a few deep pits in the back of the rocker section that wasn't going to be replaced.

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With that work done, it was time to cut off the rusted outer rocker. Ed used a plasma cutter to get a rough cut out, then trimmed the edges with tin snips.

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Inside the panel the metal was clean and pretty rust free.

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He ground down any rust he found and ground off the spot welds that still held pieces of the rocker on.

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Then he used a spot blaster to clean off any additional rust he found.

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The old and new panels.

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Once the cuts were clean, he fitted up the new panel.

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Then, for the next three hours we cut, snipped, massaged, and fitted the panel until it was lined up perfectly.

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Then it was time to weld the panel in. Ed used a MIG to tack everything in place.

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Finally, he TIG welded the seam, doing small lengths in different areas to prevent warping from excessive heat.

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And clamped the bottom seam together with this tool.

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With that done, he was ready to tackle the dents in the cowl and top.





 

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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This morning I went over to Crin's place to view the freshly painted front fenders. The clear-coat went on last night. They still need to be wet sanded and buffed, but even in their raw state, they looked pretty good.

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Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>This morning I went over to Crin's place to view the freshly painted front fenders. The clear-coat went on last night. They still need to be wet sanded and buffed, but even in their raw state, they looked pretty good.

Wow! Pretty good is an understatement.

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I like them with the dints in them.....gave them character !!!

Apart from that.....wow what a job, how good do they look now. The hard part is getting them on without scratching them as they are so big !

Well done

Ian

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Excellent work. I also appreciate the effort you have made with this thread. Most enjoyable.

Ray.

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Excellent work. I also appreciate the effort you have made with this thread. Most enjoyable.

Ray.

Me too.

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Hard to believe those are the same front fenders that Ed was working on earlier!! Chris

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The attack of the Dreaded CLUM SWITCH!

Today I took a look at the infamous Clum light switch that I removed from Daphne<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate> the last time I visited Ed's. It was totally covered in black grease, but I could move the lever on the steering wheel and hear the switch click before I took it off, so I hoped for the best. It was so greasy that when I set it on a paper towel and left it overnight, there was a huge oily stain around it next morning soaked into the paper towel.

Before:
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I used acetone, an old toothbrush, my Dremel tool with fine wire wheels and a bunch of Q-tips to get everything clean. It took a good hour to get everything off. I didn't want to expose the fiberboard piece to too much acetone as I didn't know how it would react to a powerful solvent. It seems to have come through the ordeal with flying colors. I don't know what the stuff inside the switch is made of - copper contacts, of course, but I wasn't sure if the other parts were metal or more fiberboard.

It cleaned up very nicely, except for that little hunk of dirt that seems to have landed on it when I took the photos:

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As you can see from the last photo, It's a Clum<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate> 9271, and I assume it's the original. After I soaked it and cleaned everything, the switch moved through it's three positions pretty smoothly, but stopped with a positive action at each detent. I got out the volt meter and got good current flow from the various numbered contacts as I tried out the different switch positions. I'll have to check the wiring diagram tomorrow, but it looks like everything is working as it should and my Clum is still good.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate> And that makes me very happy considering what they are going for on Ebay these days.

Does anyone know if these switches were lubricated internally in any way? I ask because that lube (if any) is gone after the acetone bath. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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Re: lubricating CLUM switch. Years ago, I attempted to spray an audio/visual tuner cleaner inside. I would suspect contacts might be brass. Anyway, great looking switch. Nothing like a good coating of old oil/grease/dirt for preservation!

frank

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I have had pretty good luck shooting WD-40 into any small opening and then turning the switch a bunch. WD works well for electrical. I am not afraid to use a lot of it then dry with air.

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I have had pretty good luck shooting WD-40 into any small opening and then turning the switch a bunch. WD works well for electrical. I am not afraid to use a lot of it then dry with air.

Best way to go in my opinion. Here is what the inside of the switch looks like....

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Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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Crin has the front fenders color sanded and buffed out. They've gone from a rather garish shine to a really nice shiny glow that looks much more like the original paint on the old girl.

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This is Crin's paint booth/workshop. That's not one of my fenders, it's from his 36 Packard.

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Vent system.

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Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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Daphne arrived nearer to home today as Ed personally delivered the finished body, now temporarily back on the frame for transport, to Crin's Undercover Upholstery and Paint.

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We wheeled it off the trailer and took the body back off with Crin's lift.

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We then rolled the frame back on the trailer and Ed delivered it to my place where it now resides in my workshop - finally!

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I'm going over tonight to take the windows out of the body and I'll take detailed pictures of the completed body work. It now looks like that huge slab of ice never fell on the old girl, she's straight as an arrow once again.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>I built a dolly for the body today - not exactly an engineering marvel, but good enough to move the body around as Crin sands and primes it.

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All the metal work is done - at last! - and now we can get on with the paint work. Ed did an outstanding job. What was supposed to be a two week job turned into three months, but we kept discovering new problems every time we went to inspect the next area. You've seen enough of the fenders and hood, but here a few before and afters of the body.

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It's a little tough to see, but there is a sizable dent in the center of the roof above the windshield and the cowl is caved in between the vent openings.

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And the repairs.

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Several dents removed - these were on the car when I bought it in 1965. They always drove me nuts!

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Finally, the rear door fits and closes correctly.

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I removed all the glass except the back windows, taking out the window and door latch mechanisms in the process.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate> I'll be restoring those over the next few weeks.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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Great progress. I am really enjoying following this thread.

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It's been awhile since I've posted anything. Hershey and one of my major clients suddenly closing their doors for good put a temporary hold on things. The good news - I picked up a great radiator at Hershey from fellow board member Sandbarfarm31, and a nice gas tank, along with a set of NOS king pins and a great tail light from board member yirgaman. Thanks guys! Took the top insert off the DL's body last night and will post some photos soon. Turned out to be an easy job. With the body totally stripped of glass, window and door mechanisms, trim and the top insert, sanding and priming is underway. No new pix as things look about the same as they did in post #270.

The bad news - money is tight with my losing a major client. I still hope to make Detroit next summer, but finances may play a big part in that endevor.

Well, a no cost option is me stripping down the frame and cleaning everything up, so that's next.

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Been there and had the same problems. Building our own home, buying and running a business and school fees killed my resto for 6 years. Hopefully back on track.

Keep up the great work. Looking forward to more photos

Ian

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