Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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Lots to report on. Headed out to Ed's after work to pickup my fenders. He was still working on them when I got there, just getting them ready for primer.

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He says they were about the worse set of rear fenders he's ever worked on. We probably replaced about 40 percent of the metal on both fenders. There was lots of old body work, some done with files and lead, indicating it had been done years before I owned the car in the sixties.

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Ed brush painted areas where spraying wouldn't reach - around the rolled fender bead and the double-walled areas where the running boards attach.

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Then he sprayed everything with Epoxy primer.

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After spraying the fenders - no pictures, my camera is too important to be done in by overspray - Ed tackled the radiator shell. This had been damaged in the ice fall I mentioned earlier. Since this is a chrome piece, there was no room for error. Lots of tapping, banging, massaging, measuring and more tapping got things back to close to normal.



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We found the shell had been mashed about a half inch out of shape and badly dented. Not only did the metal have to end up perfectly smooth for plating, we also had to make sure the shell was symmetrical so the hood would fit correctly.

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Once Ed got the shape correct using a contour gauge to check everything, he worked the metal with small hammers and picks to smooth things out.

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Finally, he used a roller tool to get out an tiny imperfections. The Patent date on the roller was 1921!

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The finished product was smooth as silk and ready for plating. There were a few small file marks visible in the plating, but they will go when the plating is taken off at the chrome shop.

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Next we went to work on the trim piece that covers the gas tank at the rear of the frame. I say "we", but Ed did all the work and I took pictures and sometimes helped him hold the piece in position.

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The biggest problem was the buildup of grease oil and undercoat. Lots of scraping and disk sanding to get to the bare metal.

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This was a small dent and it is going to be painted, so we were finished in about twenty minutes.

By this time, the fenders were dry, so I loaded everything into my car and drove home with the accompanying odor of epoxy primer.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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This morning I took the fenders, gas tank cover, hood and running board shields over to Crin Dima at Undercover Upholstery and Paint. I can't tell you what a relief it is to finally get the fenders into paint!

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Crin also had my interior parts painted base color and ready for woodgraining.

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I'll have coverage when he does the rolling of the wood patterns.

So, it looks like everything but the body will be painted shiny black within the next two weeks!

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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Phil Kennedy checked on his original car and found the same thing - no hanger.

This should shed some light on the subject, maybe answer a couple of questions while leaving that mystery bracket still a puzzle.

I believe the hanger at the cross member is either original or a replacement of the original design. There is another hanger just in front of the gas tank.

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I got my water-pump back from the Flying Dutchman. It looks great! The $95 estimate went out the window when they had to find a new impeller - mine was rusted way to nothing. But they called and checked and the final price of $150 wasn't too bad. Cleaned, lubricated, new impeller, new shaft and modern packing seal - who could ask for more?


BEFORE:

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AFTER:

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They even sent me a NOS gasket - and two Tootsieroll Pops.


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Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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I took my radiator in Friday to be cleaned and checked out, and we discovered an important piece was missing! It's a bracket on top of the radiator tank. I suspect this may have gone missing when the ice hit the hood, but who knows at this point. Does anyone out there have an old radiator or part of one that has this piece? It's the one in GREEN in the picture below, kindly supplied by Phil Kennedy. I could also use the RED piece. I have a nice new set of stainless hinge pins (blue) so I don't need those. I can probably make one, but it's a bit tricky as this sets the height of the hood relative to the radiator shell and everything has to be just right to fit on the tank.

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Any help would be gratefully appreciated!

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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I will try to check on the weekend if I have an extra radiator. I'm thinking that I don't, but I'll look anyhow.

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I'm sorry that I cannot be very original here, but the work is looking really, really good. Thanks for posting such great pictures of the ongoing restoration.

Keith

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I just wanted to thank everyone for their kind words. Sorry I haven't responded individually, but this thread is probably already too long as it is. I hope you're finding at least some of this stuff interesting.

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Thanks for the updates. I really appreciate this thread and all the photos, and I don't care how long it gets. My DL has been previously taken apart, so many of the details I don't have (body mounting, etc) and I am looking forward to start on my project soon. This thread is helping me see what I'm missing, and how the car is supposed to be put together even though I am working with a coupe.

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I just wanted to thank everyone for their kind words. Sorry I haven't responded individually, but this thread is probably already too long as it is. I hope you're finding at least some of this stuff interesting.

No...the thread is not too long. Yes...all of it is VERY interesting. It is especially interesting to me as I have two 1931s to do and your '32 is similar.

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I brought the last batch of parts over to Crin this morning. The other hood top, the other running board side piece, the luggage rack and assorted trim pieces. Now he has everything but the body and the hood sides.

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He's working on the front fenders and is using an Evercoat product called Slick Sand. It's basically a spray-on body filler. I could not believe how it covered pits and small imperfections on the fenders. Once he had two coats on, he sanded the fenders. Only a few low spots showed up that will need actual body filler applied in the usual manor. Once that's on and sanded, he'll apply one more light coat of Slick Sand, a guide coat, and do the final sanding. Then it's ready for paint. As Crin mentioned to me, it's going to be black and that shows every imperfection, so these have to be right.

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You can see the coat of Slick Sand in these pictures. I some areas where it went on very heavy, you can see slight ripples. That just excess or "runs" that sand out very nicely and leave a smooth surface.

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It seems strange to have all the exterior parts out of my hands and getting prepared for paint, but I'm certainly not complaining.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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Word back from the radiator shop that my radiator is toast. When they were hot tanking it, chunks of Stop Leak where coming out in massive amounts. Plus, my top tank has a split in it. Luckily, I found a replacemnt from a 20,000 mile DL that I'm going to pick up at Hershey. Now, I have an extra bracket if I need one.

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Too bad about the original radiator. EXCELLENT news that you found another! So that means that you may have two hood brace anchor brackets (the ones on either side of the center bracket) to sell?

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Sounds like it. I won't know for sure until I see my "new" one, but if you need one I'll keep you in mind.

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Thanks for keeping this in one thread. You are about a few months ahead of me and my 1933 Plymouth and I find this to be an excellent guide. It gives advance warning as to what I can expect. It doesn't get better than this.

Chris

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With the frame and body still at Ed's and the rest of the sheet-metal at Crin's for paint, I was running out of projects, so I tackled the windshield. All these photos were taken after I got it apart - that's why there's no glass.

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Upon examination, the window frame is just two pieces, the lower half which consists of the curved bottom and the two uprights, and the top piece that goes straight across. Disassembly looked simple - it always does - but turned out to be a bit more complicated. It looked like two simple bolts held the top piece to the bottom piece. Both came out easily. These things are sometimes called sex bolts since one screws into the other.

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With them removed, I figured the top piece would just pull right off. WRONG! Something was preventing it from coming loose. I thought maybe the glass was sticking and preventing it from coming free, so I tapped at it with a hard piece of wood trying to get it loosened up without breaking the glass. After about five taps - the glass broke. I discovered that it was plain old glass, not tempered, not safety. This came as something of a shock as I thought DB were using some sort of safety glass in at least the windshield by 1932, but I was wrong. No big deal since I plan on replacing all the glass, anyway.

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So, obviously, something else was holding the top piece on. Originally, there were hinge pivots sticking out near the top of the frame, simple metal rods that rest on pivot brackets inside the body. Mine were broken off long ago - before I bought the car in 65. Looking closely, I could see the remains of the rods still the top of the uprights. I had no choice at this point. so I carefully drilled them out. It was easy since I think they were made of pot metal! No wonder they broke! Most of my Dodge has impressive engineering for its time, but someone dropped the ball with this one. Once they were out I discovered these little guys hiding back inside the top piece. The hinge rods were designed to screw onto this piece. With the remains of the rods gone, the top piece came right off.

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The glass was held in place by a channel that seems to be made of a felt-like material. It isn't rubber, that's for sure.

The top piece is really pitted and has rather thin walls, so I'm not sure it can be replated. I'll take it to the chrome shop, but I'm not optimistic. If it's not good, I'm thinking of having the piece machined as its really just a simple channel with a rounded section on top.

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The bottom section is much heavier, with thick walls. It should clean up and plate nicely.

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As usual, each new project presents its own set of problems. Coming up with solutions is the fun part.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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The body of my DL is attached by bolts that rest in a channel- shaped trim piece, then extend through the running board splash piece, the body, and then the frame.

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I've seen these called channel bolts, T-bolts, and captive bolts. The problem is, I can't find anyone who has them. Grainger and McMaster-Carr don't list them. Anyone know of a source? They take a 1/2 nut and are about an inch and 5/8 long.

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The rounded end slides into the channel trim piece and is held there blind where it can't turn. This allows you to tighten the nut without having to hold the bolt from the front.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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Taylormade,

They look like the bolts used to hold a toilet onto a floor flange. They come in two popular sizes in the plumbing section of your local hardware store, 1/4-20 and 5/16-18. the length is usually 2 inches or more and you would cut these down. Larger diameters are another story and if these are 3/8 or 1/2 diameter bolts I would give a call to Restoration Specialties and Supply Co.

For the windshield frame the same company has the barrel nut and oval head screw set. The are nickel plated brass and you have to order each part as a separate item.

Chris

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Finally had time to take a few pics of what your tailpipe bracket should look like. This from a '32 DK. I had this revulcanized by Antique Auto Parts Cellar, who does excellent work. Looks like you're missing the u-shaped inner plate with the 2 studs that's part of the vulcanized assembly, which the tailpipe bracket bolts to, as well as the tailpipe bracket.

Love the work and documentation you're doing!

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The body of my DL is attached by bolts that rest in a channel- shaped trim piece, then extend through the running board splash piece, the body, and then the frame.

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I've seen these called channel bolts, T-bolts, and captive bolts. The problem is, I can't find anyone who has them. Grainger and McMaster-Carr don't list them. Anyone know of a source? They take a 1/2 nut and are about an inch and 5/8 long.

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The rounded end slides into the channel trim piece and is held there blind where it can't turn. This allows you to tighten the nut without having to hold the bolt from the front.

Try " Restoration Supply Company " Aprox page 42. Look similar to what your after. These people have a good range of stuff.

Cheers

Ian

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These things are sometimes called sex bolts since one screws into the other.

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I've always called those "Chicago Screws". I guess I've learned a new term today.

FWIW, I thought my windshield frame cleaned up and plated pretty well. But, at least for 1933 Plymouths, there is a hollow in that piece. I think it was originally an extrusion to make it in that shape. Anyway, neither the plater nor I got the inside fully flushed out of the chemicals the plater used and it corroded through to the surface in only a couple of years. So just make sure that anyplace that might have some residues from the plating operation get thoroughly rinsed and neutralized. Fortunately for me N/C Industries makes a very nice replacement for the '33 Plymouth windshield frame.

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Finally! The answer to the mysterious rubber channel. Thanks 34doger. I'm sure I'll have good luck finding one of those. :) Looks like another trip to my sheet-metal guy.

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Ian,

Can't seem to find the Restoration Supply Company you're speaking of. I found Restoration Specialties & Supply Company but they don't have what I'm looking for.

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